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Jan in CA
08-02-2010, 12:30 PM
So what is everyone reading right now? Any good mysteries or knitting novels you're into?

If you like mysteries I just finished Rough Country by John Sandford. ***** (5 stars) Not sure what's next...

artistatlarge101
08-02-2010, 04:56 PM
Hi Jan,
I am reading "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo". I'm almost 200 pages into it and so far I find it well written and really good. It was written in Swedish and then translated into English.

I have read several of John Sanford's books. Like his Prey series. Give me a good mystery any day and I'll be a happy camper!

ShanaHoo
08-02-2010, 05:21 PM
Right now I am reading Tinkers by Paul Harding. It is not a mystery, but won a Pulitzer prize and was recommended to me by my high school English teacher (yay, Facebook). My ability to handle "real literature" was burned out of me by my 3rd year of college, and now I usually prefer quick, easy, satisfying smut novels, but every once in a while I feel the need to read something heavy.

I've got about 10 books in my "to read" pile and I'm really excited about the next one, The Strain by Gillermo Del Toro and Chuck Hogan. None of those sissy Twilight vampires for me! This book is supposed to be more horror/suspense.

I've decided that I need to start buying audio books. I get home from work every day and agonize over whether I want to knit or read more. If I had books on tape, then I'd be able to do both AT THE SAME TIME! Genius!

Jan in CA
08-02-2010, 07:59 PM
I love the John Sandford Prey Series! My DH and I have been reading from the first one and now we are at the last when we can get it from the library. The one I mentioned was a Virgil Flowers mystery..he works with Lucas Davenport and they are just as good.

Smut novel? What the heck is that? I don't consider anything I read smut. :??

ShanaHoo
08-02-2010, 08:16 PM
Smut novel? What the heck is that? I don't consider anything I read smut. :??



Ha! "Smut novels" are what my mom calls "romance novels." I have quite the collection of Nora Roberts and Karen Marie Moning.

Jan in CA
08-02-2010, 10:00 PM
Ha! "Smut novels" are what my mom calls "romance novels." I have quite the collection of Nora Roberts and Karen Marie Moning.

Oh I see! I don't usually read those. I prefer mysteries or knitting novels. ;)

saracidaltendencies
08-02-2010, 10:42 PM
I'm currently reading Await Your Reply By Dan Chaon. I'm not too far into it but it hasn't totally captured me yet...I don't dislike it but it's one of those books where there's more than one main character involved so each chapter covers a character...Gets kind of annoying sometimes because you get so wrapped up in the character you're reading about that you have to go back to refresh your memory as to what was going on with the previous character/s...lol...It has, however, kept me interested enough to keep picking the book up...I'm also reading, kind of...lol, The Story of Edgar Sawtelle By David Wroblewski...While I was relatively interested in the book, other crap got in the way and I put it down and eventually kind of lost interest in reading for a while...lol...Once I finish Await Your Reply, I'll pick up this one again and probably have to start it over...lol

Jan in CA
08-02-2010, 10:48 PM
chapter covers a character...Gets kind of annoying sometimes because you get so wrapped up in the character you're reading about that you have to go back to refresh your memory as to what was going on with the previous character/s..

You know that is one of the things I like about my Kindle app. I make can make a note of basic points about each character and it's just a quick look at my bookmarks (you don't lose your page) and I can see that "Joan Smith" is a detective with ABC Agency or whatever. It's very handy when I try new authors and I'm not familiar with the characters. :thumbsup:

KnitterGirl12
08-03-2010, 12:33 PM
Right now I am reading an awesome book called The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin.
"A highly inventive mystery begins when sixteen unlikely people gather for the reading of the very strange will of the very rich Samuel W. Westing. They could become millionares, depending on how they play the game. All they have to do is find the answer- but the answer to what? The Westing game is tricky and dangerous, but the heirs play on- through blizzards, burglaries, and bombings...."
It is a winner of the Newbery Medal. *****(5 stars):yay:

ArtLady1981
08-03-2010, 01:52 PM
I recently downloaded an e-book from Amazon onto my desktop e-reader (free). The book is THE HELP, by Kathryn Stockett.

It is fabulous. Read it almost non-stop til done!

Here are two reviews, as seen on Amazon:

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. What perfect timing for this optimistic, uplifting debut novel (and maiden publication of Amy Einhorn's new imprint) set during the nascent civil rights movement in Jackson, Miss., where black women were trusted to raise white children but not to polish the household silver. Eugenia Skeeter Phelan is just home from college in 1962, and, anxious to become a writer, is advised to hone her chops by writing about what disturbs you. The budding social activist begins to collect the stories of the black women on whom the country club sets relies and mistrusts enlisting the help of Aibileen, a maid who's raised 17 children, and Aibileen's best friend Minny, who's found herself unemployed more than a few times after mouthing off to her white employers. The book Skeeter puts together based on their stories is scathing and shocking, bringing pride and hope to the black community, while giving Skeeter the courage to break down her personal boundaries and pursue her dreams. Assured and layered, full of heart and history, this one has bestseller written all over it. (Feb.)
Copyright Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From The Washington Post

From The Washington Post's Book World/washingtonpost.com Reviewed by Sybil Steinberg

Southern whites' guilt for not expressing gratitude to the black maids who raised them threatens to become a familiar refrain. But don't tell Kathryn Stockett because her first novel is a nuanced variation on the theme that strikes every note with authenticity. In a page-turner that brings new resonance to the moral issues involved, she spins a story of social awakening as seen from both sides of the American racial divide.

Newly graduated from Ole Miss with a degree in English but neither an engagement ring nor a steady boyfriend, Eugenia "Skeeter" Phelan returns to her parents' cotton farm in Jackson. Although it's 1962, during the early years of the civil rights movement, she is largely unaware of the tensions gathering around her town.

Skeeter is in some ways an outsider. Her friends, bridge partners and fellow members of the Junior League are married. Most subscribe to the racist attitudes of the era, mistreating and despising the black maids whom they count on to raise their children. Skeeter is not racist, but she is naive and unwittingly patronizing. When her best friend makes a political issue of not allowing the "help" to use the toilets in their employers' houses, she decides to write a book in which the community's maids -- their names disguised -- talk about their experiences.

Fear of discovery and retribution at first keep the maids from complying, but a stalwart woman named Aibileen, who has raised and nurtured 17 white children, and her friend Minny, who keeps losing jobs because she talks back when insulted and abused, sign on with Skeeter's risky project, and eventually 10 others follow.

Aibileen and Minny share the narration with Skeeter, and one of Stockett's accomplishments is reproducing African American vernacular and racy humor without resorting to stilted dialogue. She unsparingly delineates the conditions of black servitude a century after the Civil War.

The murders of Medgar Evers and Martin Luther King Jr. are seen through African American eyes, but go largely unobserved by the white community. Meanwhile, a room "full of cake-eating, Tab-drinking, cigarette-smoking women" pretentiously plan a fundraiser for the "Poor Starving Children of Africa." In general, Stockett doesn't sledgehammer her ironies, though she skirts caricature with a "white trash" woman who has married into an old Jackson family. Yet even this character is portrayed with the compassion and humor that keep the novel levitating above its serious theme.

Copyright 2009, The Washington Post. All Rights Reserved.

Jan in CA
08-03-2010, 02:09 PM
I read The Help on my kindle app and loved it! :yay:

vaudiss
08-03-2010, 08:09 PM
Right now I am reading an awesome book called The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin.
"A highly inventive mystery begins when sixteen unlikely people gather for the reading of the very strange will of the very rich Samuel W. Westing. They could become millionares, depending on how they play the game. All they have to do is find the answer- but the answer to what? The Westing game is tricky and dangerous, but the heirs play on- through blizzards, burglaries, and bombings...."
It is a winner of the Newbery Medal. *****(5 stars):yay:

LOVE this book....have read it several times since i was in elementary school and everytime i rediscover it on the book shelf i read it again!!!

saracidaltendencies
08-03-2010, 10:55 PM
You know that is one of the things I like about my Kindle app. I make can make a note of basic points about each character and it's just a quick look at my bookmarks (you don't lose your page) and I can see that "Joan Smith" is a detective with ABC Agency or whatever. It's very handy when I try new authors and I'm not familiar with the characters. :thumbsup:


Aww, awesome! That would surely come in handy, especially with this book...I'm actually starting to get a tad bit frustrated with it, the way its written seems a mess...I'm still not totally turned off of the book just yet, but, something better happen soon! Over 100 pages into it and nothing significant has happened, just a lot of character background, really...and it's getting to the point where it's kinda starting to drag on...lol

Mirl56
08-04-2010, 10:37 AM
Hi Jan,
I am reading "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo"[COLOR="DarkOrchid"]. I'm almost 200 pages into it and so far I find it well written and really good. It was written in Swedish and then translated into English.



I just reserved Dragon Tattoo from my library - I'm #245 on the reserve list! I wonder how long it will be before it's my turn?

I'm making my way thru the Outlander series by Diana Gabledon (sp).

Jan in CA
08-04-2010, 12:32 PM
I just reserved Dragon Tattoo from my library - I'm #245 on the reserve list! I wonder how long it will be before it's my turn?

I'm making my way thru the Outlander series by Diana Gabledon (sp).

Omigosh...I've done that! It seems like you'll never get it! You check every day and wow..you've moved up ONE..at that rate... :lol:

davespurl
08-04-2010, 02:35 PM
Hi Jan,
I am reading "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo". I'm almost 200 pages into it and so far I find it well written and really good. It was written in Swedish and then translated into English.

I have read several of John Sanford's books. Like his Prey series. Give me a good mystery any day and I'll be a happy camper!
I'm reading Girl with the Dragon Tattooas well. Its taken me a while to get into it, but its picking up. Everyone is raving about this series, so I hope I'll like it as well as others do.

davespurl
08-04-2010, 02:37 PM
I read The Help on my kindle app and loved it! :yay:
The Help was an awesome book! I read it in about 3 days. Couldn't put it down!

vaudiss
08-04-2010, 04:52 PM
I'm reading Girl with the Dragon Tattooas well. Its taken me a while to get into it, but its picking up. Everyone is raving about this series, so I hope I'll like it as well as others do.

The second picks up quicker but I haven't read the third yet

ShanaHoo
08-04-2010, 06:51 PM
I'm making my way thru the Outlander series by Diana Gabledon (sp).

Is it any good? I keep starting the first one, but I'm having trouble getting into it. The books are huge and the series is long and I'm afraid to start to invest myself if it's going to end in disappointment.

Also, I think I accidentally biased myself against liking it already because I've read Gabaldon's blog a few times and I don't really like her very much. The entire time I'm reading it, I'm not thinking about the character, I'm thinking about the author.

This happened to me with The Lovely Bones, unfortunately. I started reading it about a week after the commercials for the movie started running and everytime there'd be a scene in the book with the dad, all I could think about was Mark Walberg's God-awful haircut in the movie :ick: It just totally killed it for me, uhgh!

So morally of the story: Outlander- worth it or no?

kishiki4
08-04-2010, 11:19 PM
Just finished Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood. Dystopian literature is pretty cool.
Just started both the Girl With the Dragon Tattoo and the first book in the Lumby series.
I think after those series, I'm going to start a Russian literature kick. Crime and Punishment, Anna Karenina, etc...

Jan in CA
08-05-2010, 12:44 AM
I just started reading Spinning Forward. It's a spinning/knitting book.

Debkcs
08-05-2010, 04:40 AM
I'm forever reading non-fiction, to keep up with my husbands voracious book reading habits. Today, though, I downloaded "Treassure Island" on my iPhone Kindle App for free. Sat down to lunch in a Chinese restaurant, all by myself, and read for over an hour. What a pleasure that was!

KathleenG
08-05-2010, 06:46 AM
Loved The Help!

cacunn
08-05-2010, 10:16 AM
Check your local library's web page, many are now allowing the download of audio books to MP3 player. All you need is a library car, computer and a MP3 player.

There are also some spots on the web, like LibriVox and others that will allow the download of public domain books.

Jan in CA
08-05-2010, 01:17 PM
Deb - I've downloaded so many free books from Amazon! Some of them are classics like Treasure Island, but many are just the first in a series or one book from a series to get the author known. It's so cool! I've found several new authors that way!

Do you know how to find them? If not I'll explain how I do it.

KnitterGirl12
08-05-2010, 02:42 PM
To those who have a kindle, what is so great about it? Why not just get books from the library or borrow books from a friend?:think:

kmaclean
08-05-2010, 04:24 PM
I love my kindle! You can tons of books and knitting patterns with you all the time, among other benefits.

To KnitterGirl12, I believe there is a topic on "Kindle vs. Nook" (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=97887) where the pros and cons of the kindle and other e-readers are being discussed ... might be worth checking out!

Jan in CA
08-05-2010, 06:33 PM
To those who have a kindle, what is so great about it? Why not just get books from the library or borrow books from a friend?:think:

I do get books from the library. A lot. :teehee: I have the app on my iPod Touch and it's great when you're going places and don't want to carry a book. Also because I can download samples for free I can see if I like a book before I buy it or it get it from the library. It's not a necessity by any means. I think if a person travels a lot it would also be nice.

saracidaltendencies
08-06-2010, 12:03 AM
Ya know, I don't know if I'll ever get used to "modern technology". I mean I'm only (? lol) 33 and grew up with evolving technology but I'm old school at heart...Though it seems like it would be really awesome to have a Kindle, I can't help it, I just love having the actual book...I love the feel of the pages, the soft rippling sound they make as you turn from one page to another; I love the slick feel of the paperback and the sturdy, textured feel of the hardback book - I love the weight of the book in my hand and thumbing the side of the book, opposite the spine, as if the pages were a deck of playing cards I was shuffling...I'm the same way with my writing...Of course I type up on the computer what I write, but only after first writing it out by hand, with my "writing pens" in paper notebooks...

Anyway, to get back on topic, I have about 20 pages left of Await Your Reply and I seriously do not recommend this book. There have been times that I actually said to myself, I DON'T CARE! when reading about certain characters but I can't bring myself to stop reading it because I have already invested so much time in it...I at least want to know how it ends! In over 200 pages I can honestly say nothing of any real significance has happened...Nothing overly memorable, nothing that has made me anxious to get to the next page, to get to the next chapter, to see how it all comes together...I really don't care that much...The main thing I want to know is if my one suspicion is right, that's all I really care about finding out...The book is readable enough, I mean I haven't abandoned it, but at times the author seems quite pretentious with his word choices and I don't necessarily find that all of his characters are believable...I'll finish it but I really don't recommend it.

KnitterGirl12
08-07-2010, 12:52 AM
Thanks everyone!cloud9

HollyP
08-07-2010, 12:13 PM
I just got The Help from the library! I was in line since it came out I think my place was 294. I honestly forgotten about it until I got the notice that they had it for me.

borealowl
08-08-2010, 10:36 PM
I too have read most of John Sandford's thrillers and finished Wicked Prey a few weeks ago. Then I got involved in a series of historical novels about the Irish by Morgan LLywelyn. The first is 1916 and now I am reading 1949. I think there are three more. The first began with the Irish Easter uprising. Very realistic with lots of history but lots of romance as well. Actually there was one in between I forgot about, 1921.

Jan in CA
08-08-2010, 11:38 PM
I've never been to interested in historical fiction. History in general isn't too interesting to me unless it's in the forum a book like Black Like Me (http://www.amazon.com/Black-Like-Me-Complete-Unabridged/dp/B000J0JHIM/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1281325021&sr=1-2) (non fiction and excellent btw) or The Help. :lol:

I finished Spinning Forward (http://www.amazon.com/Spinning-Forward-Terri-DuLong/dp/0758232047/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1281324976&sr=8-1) last night and I liked it a lot. Not a whole lot of knitting or spinning in it, but it's still good. :thumbsup:

These are all good ones to get from the library.

cftwo
08-09-2010, 12:51 PM
For mystery lovers, if you have not read the Mrs. Pollifax series, I strongly recommend them. I got all of mine through Paperbackswap.com and then passed them along to my sister, who agrees they are pretty good. The main character is a spunky widow of indeterminate age but white hair who basically shows up at the CIA and asks how she can help.

Currently, I'm reading Rhys Bowen's Evan Evans series - I'm a couple of chapters into "Evan and Elle". They are all set in a small village in Wales.

I recently stumbled on Lynn Kurland's books (time travel/medieval romance) which I'm enjoying.

On the non-fiction front, I have a couple of books in process, including some books on emotional eating. I just started a book that discusses the effects of social/economic inequalities, looking at all sorts of international data. It promises to be interesting.

I call myself a "compulsive reader", as you can tell by the length of my books-in-progress list.

As far as the e-book debate goes, I think I'll eventually get one. However, at the moment, it's still cheaper for me to get books through Paperbackswap.com (my choice over my library) than it would be to get books through a kindle/nook. For my sister who lives in France, though, a kindle/nook would be a good investment and a better and cheaper way to get English-language books. I mail her a big box once a year or so, but it's not quite the same.

Jan in CA
08-09-2010, 01:29 PM
I LOVED the Mrs. Pollifax series! They are written by Dorothy Gilman. I also read a few of the non series books which were also good. If you decided to try them I suggest starting with the first one.
http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/G_Authors/Gilman_Dorothy.html

Another good series with older heroines is the Southern Sisters mysteries. I enjoyed them greatly. The author, who passed away in 2001, is Anne George.
http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/G_Authors/George_Anne.html

Debkcs
08-09-2010, 03:06 PM
My favorite 'new to me' author is Louise Penny. She's written the Inspector Gamache series. Seems in the tiny village of Three Pines, there is often a murder to solve. She seems to love her characters, and even my DH, a died in the wool non-fiction reader, has read all of these.

You don't have to, but it helps to read them in order.

borealowl
08-09-2010, 03:44 PM
There is a series I have really enjoyed by Jennifer Chiaverrini (sp) about a group of quilters - the Elm Creek Quilters. Very good even if you are not a quilter.

Jan in CA
08-09-2010, 08:39 PM
Just thought of another good one that I just discovered! I got a sample of The Surgeon on my iTouch and liked it enough to get the book from the library. I just picked up the second in the series today. Authors name is Tess Gerritsen.
http://www.stopyourekillingme.com/G_Authors/Gerritsen_Tess.html

Great ideas for new authors everyone!

cftwo
08-10-2010, 03:01 PM
Another mystery rec - Donna Andrews' Meg Langslow series, which begins with Murder with Peacocks. It's a hilariously funny series.

cindycactus
08-10-2010, 03:59 PM
I just finished Game Over by Fern Michaels. Her Sisterhood series. I also finished Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand. Bought it from Amazon and downloaded it to the free Kindle Ap for my computer. (Thank you Art Lady) I like all different genre books. I also use the Library and download MP3 books an load them on my MP3 player.

melmac51
08-10-2010, 10:19 PM
I just finished "Needles and Pearls" by Gil MacNeil. It's the sequel to "The Beach Street Knitting Society. Both were good books. Before that, it was "Breaking Dawn", by Stephanie Meyers (the final in the "Twilight" series). Enjoyed it thoroughly.

I also like Jodi Picoult's books, and Stephen King, and Dean Koontz.

(As you can see, my tastes are all over the place!)

...and Demonica, I'm with you. I like to hold the actual books in my hands.

linknit41
08-12-2010, 07:52 PM
One of my favorite authors is Alexander McCall Smith, who writes the #l Ladies' Detective Agency series, as well as 3 or 4 other series. I love them. Right now, am reading the Redwall books by Brian Jacques. They are sort of in the Watership Down vein, the characters are all animals of various sorts. They are actually listed as young adult fiction, but i like them because there is no foul language, which turns me off rather quickly. Language can be so rich, surely "intelligent" people who write can come up with alternatives to profanity. I saw a sign somewhere once that said "profanity is the crutch of the inarticulate." Oh, well, just an old lady's opinion!! linknit41

Jeremy
08-12-2010, 07:52 PM
To Heal a Fractured World by Jonathan Sacks, A History of Christianity by Maccullough and Legacy of the Dead by Charles Todd.
The last is a mystery, part of a series. I really like the protagonist (he suffers from shell shock and a man he killed sort of lives in his head and talks to him) and the setting-post WWI England which I also love.

saracidaltendencies
08-12-2010, 10:50 PM
I finished that crappy book I was reading, finally...lol...Waste of time...But now I'm reading "On Writing" by Stephen King. I can't remember which site I was browsing, some author's site, but, that author had a list of recommended reading for writers and "On Writing" was one of them. After finding out more about the book I decided I wanted it...I'm typically not a big fan of Stephen King's work, but I totally respect the guy! Anyway, I LOVE the book so far! I wouldn't really call it an autobiography though it pretty much is...lol...The book is more about what led him to write and what has inspired his stories, stuff like that...I got it mainly for his input on writing, but, I love it also for the story he's telling!

borealowl
08-13-2010, 04:58 PM
Interesting to find out what others are reading and know about some new books. I get tired of the unnecessary profanity too (showing my age) . There is a lot of it in Sandford's books too, although it does fit with the characters.

N0obKnitter
08-13-2010, 05:56 PM
I'm reading my hardcover uber thick Echo in the Bone again...

mspwrz
08-13-2010, 06:42 PM
I am reading 'The Friday Night Knitting Club'.

KnitterGirl12
08-13-2010, 07:48 PM
Is that a good book for a 12 year old? I have been wondering wether to read that book. It seems interesting.

kristaj
08-13-2010, 09:07 PM
Is it any good? I keep starting the first one, but I'm having trouble getting into it. The books are huge and the series is long and I'm afraid to start to invest myself if it's going to end in disappointment.

Also, I think I accidentally biased myself against liking it already because I've read Gabaldon's blog a few times and I don't really like her very much. The entire time I'm reading it, I'm not thinking about the character, I'm thinking about the author.

This happened to me with The Lovely Bones, unfortunately. I started reading it about a week after the commercials for the movie started running and everytime there'd be a scene in the book with the dad, all I could think about was Mark Walberg's God-awful haircut in the movie :ick: It just totally killed it for me, uhgh!

So morally of the story: Outlander- worth it or no?
I love Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series. In fact that is one of the things I have been reading this summer break. I have gone back and started the series from the beginning. It is like I am visiting with old friends. I think though that if you do not like her writing on her blog you may not like her books. Her writing style is similar in both. The stories in her books though are very engaging and addictive. All of her fans are not so patiently waiting for her next book since she left us with 3 cliffhangers in Echo in the Bone.

mspwrz
08-14-2010, 12:45 AM
Is that a good book for a 12 year old? I have been wondering wether to read that book. It seems interesting.

I just started it. Will let you know after I have read more. Have you read any of the Blossom Street series by Debbie Macomber? These are good positive reads. I like this type of book that tells a realistic story about characters living normal lives. They do not have any language or sexual content inappropriate for your age.

yarndolly
08-14-2010, 12:01 PM
I am currently reading "Contact" by Carl Sagan. Remember the movie staring Jodie Foster? Maybe now I'll understand more clearly what's going on.

I love mysteries. Anyone else a Agatha Christie fan?

BRose
08-14-2010, 04:29 PM
Right now, am reading the Redwall books by Brian Jacques. They are sort of in the Watership Down vein, the characters are all animals of various sorts. They are actually listed as young adult fiction, but i like them because there is no foul language, which turns me off rather quickly. Language can be so rich, surely "intelligent" people who write can come up with alternatives to profanity. I saw a sign somewhere once that said "profanity is the crutch of the inarticulate." Oh, well, just an old lady's opinion!! linknit41

Oooooh! I love Redwall! (Don't ask how many I own) I can't wait until my boys are old enough to read them. I listened to an audio tape of one once, just so I could hear Jacques do all the different "dialects", mole speech being my favorite, of course! I liked Redwall better than Watership Down. And I totally agree with you on profanity. ;)

I just finished re-reading (for the upteenth time) The Belgariad and The Mallorean series by David Eddings. I do enjoy a good laugh with my fantasy epics. I'll be taking a breather before starting Robert Jordan's The Wheel of Time series late next month in anticipation of #13 being released. Now there is a series than you could really use that character footnotes app on! Too bad there weren't any Kindles around 15 years ago.:wall:

Wish there was some way to knit and read at the same time...... Maybe if I grew another head?!

linknit41
08-14-2010, 06:59 PM
BRose, I am from Texas also--San Antonio at present,though I grew up in Central Texas--Bell County. linknit41

HollyP
08-15-2010, 06:57 PM
You could listen to them on Tape/cd/ Mp3. I just listened to my first audio book on a long car trip. It was a wonderful way to spend the 18 hour trip. I keep thinking I should get another audio book from the library to try while I am knitting.

mspwrz
08-16-2010, 12:11 AM
You could listen to them on Tape/cd/ Mp3. I just listened to my first audio book on a long car trip. It was a wonderful way to spend the 18 hour trip. I keep thinking I should get another audio book from the library to try while I am knitting.

Our library has a great audio book collection and has the download program as well. My son is a big fan of audio books. I used to listen to quite a few when I was driving 53 miles to work each day. I do not listen to many now that I am less than 10 minutes from work.

cftwo
08-16-2010, 08:26 AM
Is that a good book for a 12 year old? I have been wondering wether to read that book. It seems interesting.

KnitterGirl - You might like Friday Night Knitter's Club, since one of the characters is a girl who is about 12. But they do discuss some pretty heavy issues among all the knitting.

One of my friends recommended this website for books for young adults - everything I've found on there has been fabulous. I bet you'd love Anahita's Woven Riddle. It is a wonderful story about a very smart 15 year old Bedouin girl in the 19th century - she's not a knitter, but she does spin and dye her own yarn to make her own rug.

http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/yalsa/booklistsawards/bestbooksya/bbyahome.cfm

Kimbatigger
08-16-2010, 06:58 PM
Right now I am reading Tess Gerritsen's Rizzoli & Isles mysteries. I like the show and then found out it was based on novels! The books are very well written.

Mirl56
08-17-2010, 10:23 AM
Is it any good? I keep starting the first one, but I'm having trouble getting into it. The books are huge and the series is long and I'm afraid to start to invest myself if it's going to end in disappointment.

Also, I think I accidentally biased myself against liking it already because I've read Gabaldon's blog a few times and I don't really like her very much. The entire time I'm reading it, I'm not thinking about the character, I'm thinking about the author.

So morally of the story: Outlander- worth it or no?

To be honest, I had a dreadful time w/the first book, actually reading it. These books are so ridiculously BIG! I switched to the book on CD (unabridged) version (which are also crazy BIG - 48+ CD's per book!). I was able to get into it becuase the first CD or 2 I had already read so they were familiar; plus the woman who reads it does such a great job with all the Scottish & other accents. Now I'm almost finished Breath of Snow & Ashes and should be starting the next one within a week. I have about a half hr drive to work then again home so I get almost one CD done per weekday.

Love this thread, by the way. Getting lots of good books on my list as I do read real books in addition to books on CD.

dawn1838
08-17-2010, 12:25 PM
I have enjoyed reading about what everyone else is reading. I have added a few books to my "to read" list. I just finished Breaking Dawn, the last book of the Twilight Series. I loved them all! I enjoy reading books by Dean Koontz. Now I am reading Rooms by James L Rubart. I recently purchased a Nook so it is so easy to find new reads!

Jan in CA
08-17-2010, 02:21 PM
Right now I am reading Tess Gerritsen's Rizzoli & Isles mysteries. I like the show and then found out it was based on novels! The books are very well written.

Oh! I'm reading the second one now. I started out recording that show and then after the pilot they switched times or days or something dammit! Now it's not recording and I haven't seen one yet! :doh:

Tegan
08-17-2010, 03:00 PM
I'm re-reading a short story by Stephen King right now called the Langoliers... I heard there was a movie at one point but I've never seen it.

Also slowly re-working my way through The Mists of Avalon.

:]

Feef
08-17-2010, 09:59 PM
I recently finished reading "The Shack", and plan to read many times! Just.plainWOW.

Currently, I'm reading my favorite book of all time, "Helter Skelter" about the Manson murders. If I'm not mistaken, this is my 15th time LOL. No, I'm not obsessive, I'm not! I'm NOT!

:rofl:

dawn1838
08-18-2010, 09:14 AM
I recently finished reading "The Shack", and plan to read many times! Just.plainWOW.

Currently, I'm reading my favorite book of all time, "Helter Skelter" about the Manson murders. If I'm not mistaken, this is my 15th time LOL. No, I'm not obsessive, I'm not! I'm NOT!

:rofl:
I read the Shack and loved it too. Rooms by James L Rubart is very similar. I bet you would like it too.

saracidaltendencies
08-18-2010, 09:32 AM
Currently, I'm reading my favorite book of all time, "Helter Skelter" about the Manson murders. If I'm not mistaken, this is my 15th time LOL. No, I'm not obsessive, I'm not! I'm NOT!

:rofl:

AW! Thank you for bringing that up! I was reading Helter Skelter in high school then we had a house fire and lost everything, book included, and I had forgotten about it over the years...I have to add that to my "To Read" list...lol

Feef
08-18-2010, 01:25 PM
AW! Thank you for bringing that up! I was reading Helter Skelter in high school then we had a house fire and lost everything, book included, and I had forgotten about it over the years...I have to add that to my "To Read" list...lol


It's not the murders that occurred that fascinate me, it's how Vincent Bugliosi put together a case like that, with the little shreds of evidence. And, it's one of those books that when I read it again, I ALWAYS discover something new.

I think I was an investigator in a previous life or something LOL

ShanaHoo
08-19-2010, 07:55 PM
Is that a good book for a 12 year old? I have been wondering wether to read that book. It seems interesting.

I thought The Friday Night Knitting Club was a good book, but it's kind of heavy. If you are a mature reader it might be alright, I know when I was 12 I usually read things several years above my age range. If you aren't into "Boohoo" books, maybe not.

When I was a pre-teen, my FAVORITE FAVORITE books were The Song of the Lionness Quartet and The Immortals Quartet by Tamora Peirce. Fantasy with young female heroines. I still read her books today. She knows exactly what to give young adults.

I love Diana Gabaldon's Outlander series. In fact that is one of the things I have been reading this summer break. I have gone back and started the series from the beginning. It is like I am visiting with old friends. I think though that if you do not like her writing on her blog you may not like her books. Her writing style is similar in both. The stories in her books though are very engaging and addictive. All of her fans are not so patiently waiting for her next book since she left us with 3 cliffhangers in Echo in the Bone.

I think I'm going to take a break from it for a while and try to come back. I feel like I should really like it, I just have to get over that initial hump and get into it. I think one of the draws for me is that there are so many books out in the series already. I HATE reading a book in two days and then having to wait a year for another one to come out.

Puddinpop
08-19-2010, 09:14 PM
They dramatize these books so much. I guess it took place in the South, also.

Jeremy
08-22-2010, 12:12 PM
It's not the murders that occurred that fascinate me, it's how Vincent Bugliosi put together a case like that, with the little shreds of evidence. And, it's one of those books that when I read it again, I ALWAYS discover something new.

I think I was an investigator in a previous life or something LOL

He was the prosecutor. His other books are excellent too. I love his method. Legal pad after legal pad filled with questions; questions for every contingency. He works for weeks on his cross examination.

N0obKnitter
08-24-2010, 10:04 AM
I'm an absurdly fast reader and it takes me way longer than 2 days to devour a Gabaldon book lol...that's another reason why I like that series - lottssaaa pages. :D