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NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-08-2010, 06:58 AM
As well as my purple project I have some smaller items otn which may or may not turn out to be Christmas gifts. These are: a wrist cuff/mug warmer in rainbow acrylic yarn, designed by Kelly Klem to be knit in the round on 2 straight needles; a round wash cloth knit on 2 straight needles in white cotton; a round coaster again knit on 2 straight needles but in dark pink cotton; and, finally a phone cover, also knit in the round on 2 straight needles in red acrylic yarn.

Progress is slow as I don't knit often, but I am getting there bit by bit.

Gillian

kmaclean
09-08-2010, 09:17 AM
Sounds like you have a lot on the go! I have to try to keep myself to one or two projects at a time or else I never finish anything! :rofl:

Can't wait to see some pics once you're finished!

hyperactive
09-08-2010, 11:07 AM
I used to think I had to finish one project and then the next, then i turned a multi-knitter and feel happy with it.
Small projects I finish quickly (most the time) but I do often have 2,3 or 4 things - sometimes more - kicking around in various stages.

Have fun finishing all those.

I will soon do phone covers, too. (but have so many other projects going on already...)

ArtLady1981
09-09-2010, 03:51 AM
Keep up your efforts! You'll make it! You always do!

BTW, how does one 'knit in the round' on 2 straight needles????

ArtLady1981
09-09-2010, 03:51 AM
Keep up your efforts! You'll make it! You always do!

BTW, how does one 'knit in the round' on 2 straight needles????

hyperactive
09-09-2010, 05:00 PM
I understood she is making things that are to be knit in the round, but she is making them on 2 straight needles... maybe I was all wrong?

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-14-2010, 03:50 AM
Keep up your efforts! You'll make it! You always do!

BTW, how does one 'knit in the round' on 2 straight needles????

Basically, you just work a stitch and slip a stitch alternately across the row. Casting on and binding off are a little more complicated.

Gillian

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-14-2010, 03:55 AM
Ps I should say that for a phone cover the cast-on is as normal. It's the open tube cast-on that is a bit more difficult.

Gillian

hyperactive
09-14-2010, 05:50 AM
That is interesting, really. I mean it is kind of logical and just consequent, but still.. I have probably not seen anybody do it for a whole project.

All I have ever seen this for is a hem cast off (garnstudio has a video for this).

Why do you do this technique? Do you not have anything but straight needles (would be way cheaper to just stay with one style, really), do you not like the other methods to work in the round? Or do you just love to confuse us? :)

aprilbetty
09-14-2010, 09:18 AM
Basically, you just work a stitch and slip a stitch alternately across the row. Casting on and binding off are a little more complicated.

Gillian
I guess that is called "double knitting?" I have done several bunny blankets (small baby "lovies") and the bunny head is done with that technique.

hyperactive
09-14-2010, 05:52 PM
well, double knitting is usually refered to when you talk about making ONE fabric with 2 stochinette sides (maybe interlaced with different colors) but there you turn your work and create edges, not a tube.

Interesting technique, though. I still think on from that point and around to practical usage and time to use it... one day I will laugh out loud because this technique will save me from a thight spot. :)

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-19-2010, 05:20 AM
Yes, this technique is referred to as a form of double-knitting.

Gillian

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-19-2010, 05:31 AM
No, I am not trying to confuse you all :). I just love this technique. I like the idea of using 2 needles to make something which usually requires dpns or circular needles.

There is a Double Knitting Yahoo Group, but I first learned the technique from a pattern in a knitting magazine.

Gillian

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-19-2010, 05:32 AM
I have made plenty of things using this technique and they do not take a long time to knit.

Gillian

hyperactive
09-19-2010, 12:02 PM
Is there an instruction for that open cast on for this method? I'd love to learn that.

I have already experimented with this double work technique and have made some stunning progress in design. (making a self hemming fabric for open sides of stochinette, neat!!)

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-25-2010, 03:59 AM
Here is a link to one method of open-tube cast-on: http://lost-arts.blogspot.com/2007/03/double-knitting-knit-along-open-tube.html . The mug warmer/wrist cuff I am doing is one of Kelly Klem's designs and she uses a different open-tube cast-on method. To order this and other patterns using this method go to http://www.etsy.com/shop/klymyshyndesign?section_id=5120832. It is probably an easier method, but see for yourself.

Gillian

hyperactive
09-25-2010, 05:59 AM
Thank you, thank you, thank you. I had wanted to ask you about this cast on.

I have been playing with your information and came up with this technique for myself that is just partial double knitting and keeps my stochinette from curling...

http://hyperactiveknitting.blogspot.com/2010/09/hemming-on-knitting.html

Have you ever tried that? I am curious.

NorthernIrelandKnitter
09-27-2010, 06:29 AM
Hi Hyperactive,

I have been looking at the technique you have devised and am beginning to get my head around it. It would be interesting to see a picture of a project you have completed with this technique in place, but well done on finding a use for the tubular knitting technique!

Btw, which part of Germany are you in? I visited your country twice in the '60s and two of my sisters were there several times during their school and university years in the '60s and '70s.

I hope you try lots more things with the tubular d-k technique!

Gillian

hyperactive
09-27-2010, 09:55 AM
Hi Hyperactive,

I have been looking at the technique you have devised and am beginning to get my head around it. It would be interesting to see a picture of a project you have completed with this technique in place, but well done on finding a use for the tubular knitting technique!

Btw, which part of Germany are you in? I visited your country twice in the '60s and two of my sisters were there several times during their school and university years in the '60s and '70s.

I hope you try lots more things with the tubular d-k technique!

Gillian

Hi!
I am thinking of doing a scarf and have already gotten some thick white yarn for that. The scarf may have ribs on the back and st st on the front. But then it is just funny for knitters and only if they look closely.
So I am stuck on deciding if I want reversible cables in it or maybe a lacey pattern down the middle or something. I will shout out loud when I am there.
I also think, I need a picot cast on and bind off to make it look nice. But all that planning keeps me away from my cast on :)

I live in Hamm, that is near Dortmund and Münster at the east edge of Ruhr Valley. Maybe you have been anywhere near here? I yet have to visit Ireland. I have been to England (a few times) and Scotland but that is not the same, I know.

hyperactive
09-30-2010, 10:43 AM
I am currently working on a scarf with this technique (pretty much like the sampler I made, just all at once :) )
I will show pictures of it soon and publish the instruction. It took me a bit to figure out how to find the right number of stitches but I finally got to it.
I will link my blogpost about that scarf here once I post it.

NorthernIrelandKnitter
10-04-2010, 06:25 AM
Hi!

I live in Hamm, that is near Dortmund and Münster at the east edge of Ruhr Valley. Maybe you have been anywhere near here? I yet have to visit Ireland. I have been to England (a few times) and Scotland but that is not the same, I know.

Well, I hadn't heard of Hamm, but when I looked it up on Google Maps I found a few familiar place names. On my first trip to Germany I stayed in Obernhof an der Lahn - or should that be am Lahn. The second time round I was in Heiligenkirchen in der Nahe von Detmold. I was doing a summer placement in a children's home there as part of my university course. There was an outdoor swimming pool in Bielefeld which we took the kids to most days. There was a path to it through a wood, so it was a pleasant walk. You could also walk to Detmold by the same path.

Pity I wasn't doing much knitting at the time and didn't think to take it with me - I could have done it during my off-duty hours! Maybe even taught the kids!

Looking forward to seeing pictures of the scarf!

Gillian

klymyshyn
01-16-2011, 04:14 PM
Keep up your efforts! You'll make it! You always do!

BTW, how does one 'knit in the round' on 2 straight needles????

The most common, convenient way to knit in the round on 2 straight needles (Tubular Double Knitting):
Cast on 1/2 of the total number of sts (as in one side of a tube scarf) - place these sts in the left hand as F (front sts now)
With the working yarn and the right needle held BEHIND the left needle: *co B (1 back st), slip F - across the needle
These 2 needle passes make the cast on foundation for an open tube. You will now knit the B and slip the F in 2 needle passes for each complete round. This makes a Reverse Stockinette Stitch pattern. You may complete the tube and turn it inside out for a RS Stockinette Stitch pattern.
I like to call this "flatfold" to distinguish it from double think double knitting. The work will have a fold at each end of the needle.