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View Full Version : KITTY BLANKETS!!


thisisme7899
11-15-2010, 04:30 PM
Hey! Have you ever wanted to knit blankets for the animal shelter, for those poor animals? If so, then I am glad to tell you, that I have SEVERAL different patterns to make for those poor babys! If someone is willing to help me, and get someone else to join, working together, we can make many blankets to help those animals! Write me and tell me if you want to! PLEASEE!!! FOR THE KITTIES AND PUPPIES! :waah:

CountryNaturals
11-15-2010, 06:11 PM
I'm so glad you're doing this. Our daughter has a charity for rescue animals. I make all sorts of things for the animals and also to sell as fundraisers. If you'd like to compare notes, send me a PM.

We just took in yet another black cat for our sanctuary location. He showed his appreciation by jumping up to the 4th shelf of the bookcase, where I was drying some catnip for the mice I make and . . . <sigh>

http://loveyourpetexpo.com/images/catnip-thief.jpg

cupid00
01-18-2011, 02:35 AM
Hey thisisme, my aunty Merry and her group of eight ladies knit blankets for the animal. Last week they all made 15 blankets for kitty as well as dog.We'll deliver the blankets to the different shelters this week, along with food and litter and toys.They will like if join with you and helps to make more blanket.

thisisme7899
01-18-2011, 03:09 PM
Ok, thats soo awsome. My art teacher makes dog beds, from like material not knitting, so when she delivers those dog beds to animal shelters, I give her the kitty blankets that I have made, and have her take them with her! I'm so glad that your aunt has a group of women who can help!
I'm 15 and I don't have as much time as I would like to have, so I've only made like.... 9 or 10 since I posted the first starting thread. I wish I could do alot more!
<3 from Moriah

mspwrz
01-18-2011, 04:08 PM
I am willing to help.

Woodi
01-29-2011, 07:16 PM
Very nice idea, and kind of you!

....but: I have two cats and they don't like knitted blankets to lie on...prefer towels or quilts. I think maybe their claws get sometimes caught in the knitting. I've offered them a garter-stitch blanket and they both rejected it.
but maybe not all cats are like these two fuss budgets!

thisisme7899
01-31-2011, 09:07 AM
Very nice idea, and kind of you!

....but: I have two cats and they don't like knitted blankets to lie on...prefer towels or quilts. I think maybe their claws get sometimes caught in the knitting. I've offered them a garter-stitch blanket and they both rejected it.
but maybe not all cats are like these two fuss budgets!

Lol. I never thought of that. I'm hoping that the cats would rather lay on one of these then have to lay on concrete floors. (fingers crossed)

jess_hawk
02-02-2011, 03:26 PM
Try felting!
I know the greyhound shelter I used to volunteer at required donated blankets to not have open weave because the dogs could get caught/tangled in it. But felted items are thick, cozy, and durable.

thisisme7899
02-03-2011, 09:06 AM
Try felting!
I know the greyhound shelter I used to volunteer at required donated blankets to not have open weave because the dogs could get caught/tangled in it. But felted items are thick, cozy, and durable.

I have never quite understood the "Felting" process... Could you explain it to me?

jess_hawk
02-03-2011, 10:12 PM
Especially for felting blankets, it's really quite easy. Basically you have to have 100% wool (or alpaca, angora, etc.) that isn't superwash. You knit up your item. It's best to not use a really tight gauge, because what you want is for the fibers to rub together a lot when you toss it in the wash.

You put the finished item in the laundry, with hot water (and a cold rinse, if possible) and maybe a pair of jeans or some tennis balls for extra agitation. As the yarn gets agitated, the fibers kind of migrate into each other, and because of the rough outer surface on each hair, they get stuck that way.

If you are doing something that is sized (like a felted hat or slippers), you have to keep a closer eye on it, but for making felted blankets for animals, just keep in mind that as the fibers get interlocked, they pull closer together, so you have to knit your object somewhat bigger than you want its finished size to be.

For cat-sized blankets, you might experiment with this by going to a thrift shop and buying a 100% wool sweater (one that says dry clean only) and throwing it in the wash. When its felted, you can cut it into cat blankets or just donate it as is!

thisisme7899
02-04-2011, 09:03 AM
lol awsome! thanks!:muah:

Mokumegane
02-07-2011, 04:16 PM
If you have plenty of yarn that will felt, you can do the kitty pi. I've made several of these from stash ends for friends' cats and dogs. http://media.wendyknits.net/knit/kittybed.htm

KatzKnitter
02-10-2011, 01:02 AM
I've volunteered at a cat shelter. Knitted blankets are not a good idea, because cats' claws will get caught and/or the blankets will get ripped up. I've had cats for 40 years and know them pretty well. The shelters around here always ask for old towels, and when they get ripped up, the shelters throw them out. Felted items still have the underlying stitches, but I have no experience with them, and my own cats gets their claws clipped every few weeks.

Did you ask the shelter what they need?

Mokumegane
02-10-2011, 08:52 AM
If you felt them well enough, felted objects are just as good as or better than the towels you mention. A welll-felted object no longer has the holes and knit stitches in it, really.

KatzKnitter
02-10-2011, 07:41 PM
Then it sounds like a wonderful project. Curious--do they have to be 100% wool to be felted?

Mokumegane
02-10-2011, 09:10 PM
They don't have to be 100% but the more wool, the better. You also don't want whites or superwash... those won't felt. Something with the lightening to make it white ruins the properties of felting in wool and superwash keeps it from shrinking or felting. You do want a fairly high percentage and avoid whites/superwash but the rest is pretty much fair game. If you're not sure and your LYS doesn't know (for some odd reason) just get a 100% non-white, non-superwash wool... that'll felt really well every time. As for anything with knitting, there are some stuff you just have to do a test patch of. With felting, there's no un-doing it and once felted, it won't felt again, so felt it to what you want in the first place. In a washing machine, check every ten minutes... by hand, you have the chance to check any time you want... The main components of felting are: wool, heat, agitation and cold (cold rinse and heat/agitation to work it to felt). I have been able to successfully felt a natural off-white color really well, though. I was lucky to catch a wool that was light in color, really.

Mokumegane
02-11-2011, 12:27 PM
Just to be clear on the felting... http://www.woolcrafting.com/boiled-wool.html That page seems to say it all rather well. Read through it all and you'll get a good understanding of the felting process.

chj
02-16-2011, 11:47 AM
I just noticed this thread - I've been knitting kitty blankies for my local shelter for the past year+. They LOVE them, and every time I take some in, the staff members are very happy. I do use acrylic - some that is donated to me, leftovers from other projects, or I buy cheap stuff on sale or use my Michaels/Joann coupons. I knit them approx. 24x24", on size 10.5 needles, using a double strand throughout.

Good job for those of you helping! :muah:

KatzKnitter
02-16-2011, 02:58 PM
That's wonderful. You can't felt acrylic, so there were no complaints about the cats ripping them up?

You're all inspiring me. We have many shelters in my area, and there will be more blizzards this winter...

KatzKnitter
02-16-2011, 03:03 PM
The main components of felting are: wool, heat, agitation and cold (cold rinse and heat/agitation to work it to felt). .

Well, I knitted a wool hat years ago, and unintentionally felted it just slightly in the wash. :aww: Rescued it just in time. But I think the term "felting" didn't exist 40 years ago. Now I wash all my hats by hand.

chj
02-16-2011, 04:25 PM
That's wonderful. You can't felt acrylic, so there were no complaints about the cats ripping them up?


No complaints. The thing is, most of the cats at this shelter seem to be adults, and they don't rip stuff up like kittens would.

Woodi
02-16-2011, 08:47 PM
The felted bed looks fabulous. I have two cats who might love those!...thanks for the pattern.

and re: the kitty shelter. I was wondering if a cat's claws might get caught in the stitches if unfelted.....and: do you knit it all garter stitch?

chj
02-17-2011, 08:10 AM
The felted bed looks fabulous. I have two cats who might love those!...thanks for the pattern.

and re: the kitty shelter. I was wondering if a cat's claws might get caught in the stitches if unfelted.....and: do you knit it all garter stitch?

Well, the staff keeps telling me that they love them, so I guess it has not been a problem. I have a couple of the blankies that I saved for myself and my cats lie on them without any issues (of course, I keep my own cats' nails trimmed).

And yes - I use straight garter stitch.

Here is a picture of some finished ones:

thisisme7899
02-17-2011, 03:01 PM
Thank you all for being such active participents in this! I am sending in an update, and I have finished 2 cat beds, and a bed that could fit a small dog, or a cat! I am now working on a large one,
Pattern being: cast on as many as you want, knit straight throught all rows, making it as large as you want!
I am having problems with my hands, but I am pushing through! I hope everyone is having fun!

HamsterLover
06-05-2011, 11:41 PM
Im a new knitter and I am wondering if this is better for new people or should I knit a scarf... and does it have to have a pattern or can it be plain??:muah:

Jan in CA
06-05-2011, 11:45 PM
Im a new knitter and I am wondering if this is better for new people or should I knit a scarf... and does it have to have a pattern or can it be plain??:muah:

This would be fine for a new knitter. Anything simple to practice your stitches is good. Pets don't care if it's perfect so don't sweat it. :thumbsup:

HamsterLover
06-06-2011, 12:30 AM
Im a new knitter and I am wondering if this is better for new people or should I knit a scarf... and does it have to have a pattern or can it be plain??:muah:

This would be fine for a new knitter. Anything simple to practice your stitches is good. Pets don't care if it's perfect so don't sweat it. :thumbsup:

Thanks So Much!!!!

:muah: You really Helped!!

thisisme7899
06-08-2011, 11:43 AM
This is a very easy pattern so it shouldn't be too hard

fatoldladyinpjs
07-05-2011, 10:06 AM
These blankets can be knit in all garter stitch, nothing fancy. It's a good mindless knitting project to do while you're watching tv. If you've ever done crafts when you were a kid, you probably used felt. It comes in various colors in sheets at the craft store. This is what your knitting will be like after it's felted. You can cut it and it won't unravel. I like to use up my tiny remnants of wool yarn this way. I'll knit maybe a five by seven rectangle in all garter stitch and felt it so it shrinks. These make great scrubbies for washing dishes. You can disinfect them better than those foam sponges. Those always retain germs. I feel I'm helping the environment because I'm rewashing them and not using paper towels to clean up the counters.

thisisme7899
10-12-2011, 09:38 AM
Im a new knitter and I am wondering if this is better for new people or should I knit a scarf... and does it have to have a pattern or can it be plain??:muah:

This is a very easy pattern for beginners!

It doesn't need any patterns at all, or you can have it have a pattern. I actually just use any stray yarn around the house, since, really, the cats won't care if it's not the most beautiful yarn in the world ( I hope! :wink: )

Also, I have 3 ragdoll cats, one looks alot like the one I found on google to show you what Ragdolls look like, and one of my cats LOVE :heart: my yarn, and even though I know any yarn she picks is just the one that she has found at that time, I use that in my cat blankets.

tomsmama
12-31-2011, 11:24 AM
The problem with using wool for cats is that they will eat it... or try. It is an animal fiber and even after all the processing, it smells like animal fiber to them. I have 3 cats and they love the loos weave crocheted baby blankets that i do. They knead them up wonderfully before i wash and bag them to give away. Of course every bed has one so they don't have to travel far, but if they can't find one specific one, they will drag their favorite from wherever.