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View Full Version : Slip Stitch Question (very new)


Nenwing
02-10-2011, 03:49 PM
Ok this may seem like a silly question, but I am super new to crocheting (just started last night!) because I figure it is a good idea to know both knit and crochet.

I am just doing a sampler type thing to practice my stitches, and am starting with the slip stitch. If I have 20 chains (I would like the piece to be 20 stitches wide), do I first make one more chain (so I would technically have 21 chain stitches) before turning the work and starting my slip stitch row?

You know how when you make a single crochet stitch you chain one at the end of the row (that one is not counted as a stitch) to get the hook up to the level of the stitch?
Basically, do I do the same thing (chain one more extra) with the slip stitch as well?

MGM
02-10-2011, 09:54 PM
Yes. Exactly what you said.

If you want 20 stitches in each row, you need to chain one extra before you turn to do a slip stitch or single crochet row, because you cannot work a slip stitch into the stitch that the loop on your hook is coming out of.

I have some beginner crochet videos for each basic stitch if you'd like to take a look at them. You might find some helpful tips. You can find the list by clicking HERE (http://www.hookedonneedles.com/2008/07/time-to-get-organized-crochet.html).

Another helpful thing you might want to look at and keep handy when you crochet is this stitch chart (http://www.hookedonneedles.com/2008/09/stitch-chart-for-crochet-another-handy.html), and also this stitch height comparison (http://www.hookedonneedles.com/2008/09/crochet-stitch-height-comparison.html).

Hope this helps!

MGM

Nenwing
02-11-2011, 11:36 PM
MGM thank you so much for the help and the links!! I think I have your stitch chart printed out (very handy!).

I am making a "sampler" with 7 rows of each type of stitch just to practice and its kind of widened out! I think I picked up a few extra stitches somewhere, is that an easy mistake to make?

MGM
02-12-2011, 12:20 AM
Yes, and a very common one too! What you might want to do for a while is count your stitches as you crochet across each row so that you can keep the same stitch count. If there are still stitches left to be work into once you have the right count, that means you worked into some stitches multiple times. If there are no stitches left and you are not yet up to your stitch count, then you skipped some stitches. Just rip out that one row and try again. Keep in mind that for some stitches, you count the turning chain as a stitch and also for some you work a stitch into the turning chain. That is where the chart comes in handy!

Keep at it. You'll be a pro in no time!

Have a great weekend!

MGM

Nenwing
02-12-2011, 04:14 PM
MGM, yeah I think that is where I went wrong, I didn't realize the chain (for the triple crochet) was a stitch in itself so I don't think I counted it, so my work quickly widened from 20 stitches to about 27! Yikes! Lol!

Is there a way to make tighter neater triple crochet stitches without it looking like a holey gaping mess? :lol:

Ellieblue
02-12-2011, 08:09 PM
Hello Mary Grace I just wanted to thank you for pointing out the crochet videos . I have been crocheting for more years than I care to count but I learned something new today. When I work a dc or tc I never realized that you keep the needle vertical when working off the loops. I was pulling the loops up and horizontal to the needle. No wonder my crochet never looked as nice as my mil's.

MGM
02-12-2011, 09:31 PM
MGM, yeah I think that is where I went wrong, I didn't realize the chain (for the triple crochet) was a stitch in itself so I don't think I counted it, so my work quickly widened from 20 stitches to about 27! Yikes! Lol!

Is there a way to make tighter neater triple crochet stitches without it looking like a holey gaping mess? :lol:

Well, not really since the point of triple crochet is to have very tall stitches so naturally there will be space between them. To get a fuller look with triple crochet, you could try using bigger yarn or a smaller hook. That is true for any stitch as well. You don't have to use the size hook recommended for the yarn. It all depends on what look you are after.

Just keep in mind that some items will require you to work to a particular gauge, so changing hook size or yarn size might not work out. But for something like a scarf or an afghan where gauge is not important, you can successfully change hook or yarn size to achieve the desired result. Play around with different combinations of hook size and yarn size and see what you like.

Have fun!

MGM

Nenwing
02-13-2011, 01:43 AM
Thank you MGM! Yes, I suppose (at least for practice) I could try smaller needles to get a not so full of holes look.

I really like your videos too, they are very helpful!