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View Full Version : Officially in love with fisherman's ribbing. Anyone with me?


TrueIconoclast
02-12-2011, 06:41 PM
Okay, so I'm finding that for some reason, my ribbing always comes out sloppy and uneven. It always comes out looking like this (especially with 2x2 ribbing):

/\/ \
/\/ \
instead of looking like this:
/\/\
/\/\

Is it my tension?

Anywho, I can do the fisherman's ribbing perfectly, plus it doesn't fold the piece like an accordian.

Anyone with me on this?

Woodi
02-12-2011, 07:11 PM
I don't know the stitch....can you describe it? or are there instructions somewhere?

Sheri
02-12-2011, 09:39 PM
I googled it and watched a video on how's it done. Looks interesting.

suzeeq
02-12-2011, 11:54 PM
I prefer Fisherman's rib because I can't stand the k p of a regular rib. And it's nice and cushy thick.

moggy
02-13-2011, 04:48 AM
my lovely mum knitted me a pullover in fishermans ribbing last year and it's the warmest thing to wear - fantastic for snuggling down in in the winter cloud9

kittykins
02-13-2011, 09:07 AM
I googled it too. Pretty neat! Once again I've learned another knitting technique. :yay: Thanks!

Jan in CA
02-13-2011, 02:07 PM
I prefer Fisherman's rib because I can't stand the k p of a regular rib. And it's nice and cushy thick.

Isn't it just a twisted knit stitch? Why do you not like regular ribbing?

suzeeq
02-13-2011, 03:41 PM
It's not a twisted rib, it's a variation of brioche stitch - see this (http://www.thedietdiary.com/blog/lucia/291). With regular ribbing you're moving the yarn back and forth for the knits and purls. The way I do F. rib is to either make all rows the same - k1, k1below - to make it reversible, or knit the ws rows. It's not necessary to purl at all and it still looks like purls.

Jan in CA
02-13-2011, 04:56 PM
Oh I see. I was thinking k1b was knitting in the back of the stitch. Interesting. :thumbsup:

KatzKnitter
02-13-2011, 08:10 PM
My K2P2 is still a little like that, True. The problem is uneven tension when doing the switch. But I'm a newbie, so hey.

/ \-/\-/ \
/ \-/\-/\

Here's another tute:

http://www.knitting-and.com/knitting/patterns/stitches/fishermansrib.htm

I'm doing a variation of that called Waffle Stitch. If you stagger each row of the Kbl and K1 by one stitch, you get little V's with spaces underneath, like a waffle

Is F Rib as stretch as K1P1?

KatzKnitter
02-13-2011, 08:17 PM
Isn't K1bl usually the symbol for "knit below"?
Kb is "knit into back leg."

This woman calls this stitch "Rose Garden," But I've seen it elsewhere as Waffle. It just offsets each Kbl and K1 by one, so it's like Fisherman's Rib broken up.

http://www.maggiesrags.com/freerosehat.htm

KatzKnitter
02-13-2011, 08:31 PM
I googled it too. Pretty neat! Once again I've learned another knitting technique. :yay: Thanks!

Like new stitches? Try these:

http://knittingonthenet.com/stitches.htm

http://knitting.about.com/od/stitchglossary/Learn_to_Knit_Knitting_Stitch_Pattern_Glossary.htm

I've just saved on my computer about 10 I like, and I'll incorporate them into something eventually. One just went into a hat.

suzeeq
02-13-2011, 08:35 PM
Knit 1 below is abbreviated as - k-b, k1b, and anything else which can get it confused with ktbl (the more common term for knit through back leg). The pattern should explain all terms and how to do them.

These sts have a variety of names given to them as well; Fisherman's rib is also called Shaker stitch or rib too. Some waffle sts also have different names, like 'honeycomb'. For example Trinity, blackberry, bramble and berry st are all the same stitch, or pretty much all the same.

KatzKnitter
02-13-2011, 08:53 PM
The stitch I'm using now uses kbl for "knit below," and to make things worse, Waffle in one glossary is not the same as Waffle in another, and Honeycomb has little resemblance to a honeycomb. There's no standardization of stitches because knitting has a 500-year history.

I'm glad the yarn weights are now standardized, but that's not perfect either. In one of my wool blends, the heather colors are thinner than the solid colors; all are #4.

suzeeq
02-13-2011, 10:34 PM
There will probably never be standardization of knitting terms and stitches. The kfb increase is also called the bar inc, which is sometimes applied to the M1 which is also called a lifted increase, which is sometimes used to mean the KLL/KRL incs (which also have other terms applied to them). The long tail CO is sometimes called the double CO because it uses 2 strands of yarn instead of the single COs like knit and cable, and it's also called a slingshot CO. A good pattern will define whatever it calls the terms it uses, and explain how to make them.

KatzKnitter
02-14-2011, 12:32 AM
Exactly. Problem is, not all patterns are that good, or we wouldn't have forums for explaining patterns. Some amateur designers, like some doctors, don't get it --the purpose of writing is to communicate ;) .

KatzKnitter
02-14-2011, 10:44 PM
There's an entire book devoted to F Rib:

http://knitting.about.com/gi/o.htm?zi=1/XJ&zTi=1&sdn=knitting&cdn=hobbies&tm=18&f=00&tt=14&bt=0&bts=0&zu=http%3A//knittersreview.com/

TrueIconoclast
02-15-2011, 07:53 PM
I don't know the stitch....can you describe it? or are there instructions somewhere?
http://www.lanagrossa.com/service/stricktipps/stricktipp_patentmuster.html (http://www.lanagrossa.com/service/stricktipps/stricktipp_patentmuster.html)

It's not a twisted rib, it's a variation of brioche stitch - see this (http://www.thedietdiary.com/blog/lucia/291). With regular ribbing you're moving the yarn back and forth for the knits and purls. The way I do F. rib is to either make all rows the same - k1, k1below - to make it reversible, or knit the ws rows. It's not necessary to purl at all and it still looks like purls.
I'm going to have to watch a video on how to do fisherman's rib without the purling. I didn't realize that it could be done that way, and that sounds like it will make this scarf a lot easier on me. I'm knitting on 3 mm needles, 30 stitches across, and it's taking FOREVER!!!!!!

TrueIconoclast
02-15-2011, 07:58 PM
BTW, does anyone know if you can do 2x2 fisherman's rib?

suzeeq
02-15-2011, 08:06 PM
Nope, I don't think you can do it in 2x2. Check the brioche stitch site (http://www.briochestitch.com), it's similar and there's a few variations.

By knitting the WS row, or repeating the k1, k1b, you create a sort of garter stitch which makes the k1 sts appear to be purled on the RS every other row, so it looks similar to a k p rib, or a mock rib. (which is k1 p1 on the RS, knit all sts on the WS).

MerigoldinWA
02-16-2011, 03:45 PM
I love the look of the Fisherman's Rib, but you people who are thinking of using it instead of regular 1X1 ribbing, just be careful because mistakes in this stitch are very hard to fix if you go beyond the row they were made on and even then a bit trickier, but doable. Catch mistakes right away, or just don't ever make any. :)

suzeeq
02-16-2011, 05:43 PM
I usually find them within a row or two and just unknit them, though I was able to pull out 3 rows the last time I used it and got the sts on right. I was just knitting the WS row though, not doing the k1b on it.

KatzKnitter
02-17-2011, 02:37 AM
I love the look of the Fisherman's Rib, but you people who are thinking of using it instead of regular 1X1 ribbing, just be careful because mistakes in this stitch are very hard to fix if you go beyond the row they were made on and even then a bit trickier, but doable. Catch mistakes right away, or just don't ever make any. :)

Right you are. I've been doing a variation of F Rib on a hat. Couldn't figure out how to fix dropped ladders, and ended up with gaps here and there. Tonight I just frogged the whole hat.

TrueIconoclast
02-22-2011, 02:45 PM
Every time I've made a mistake with this stitch, I've had to completely rip out my work and start over. Even when I drop a stitch....I noticed that when I drop a stitch and unravel the current row, there are actually 3 stitches that you have to insert your needles into to pick it back up, and they're all facing different ways, so I just unravel the whole thing.

But I'm getting better at your solution - just not ever making mistakes in f. ribbing lol

KatzKnitter
02-22-2011, 02:57 PM
Exactly. I was just complaining at another thread about this. After frogging brioche literally for days (see my post below), I gave up and used a different but less interesting stitch. And there was no WS row, because it's in the round.