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Microwench
03-10-2011, 04:59 PM
Anyone else use knitting to quit smoking?

I have been a half-pack a day smoker for 5-6 years now. Had a bad cold last week that really knocked me on my butt. I realized after a couple days sick that I hadn't smoked at all. Decided to take it as an opportunity and ride with it.
Nabbed some niccotine gum and my knitting, and I have only had 2 cigs since last Thursday!

You can't smoke while you are knitting! Hands are full, and you need to focus. I have ADHD and need something to keep my mind and hands occupied non-stop, knitting is the PERFECT solution!

Anyone else?

Jan in CA
03-10-2011, 06:27 PM
Congratulations! Anything you can do to quit is good! :hug: (I don't smoke, but my DH did so I know quitting is very hard!)

salmonmac
03-10-2011, 09:24 PM
Keep it up! That's great news. You'll end up free of cigarettes and have lots of lovely knitted pieces. All the best!

fatoldladyinpjs
03-10-2011, 10:23 PM
I sympathize. I'm trying to cut down and hopefully quit. If it helps, think about all the yarn you could buy if you didn't buy cigarettes. Maybe a visit to Knitpicks' yarn section would be a good motivator.

Microwench
03-11-2011, 08:40 AM
I sympathize. I'm trying to cut down and hopefully quit. If it helps, think about all the yarn you could buy if you didn't buy cigarettes. Maybe a visit to Knitpicks' yarn section would be a good motivator.

Yep! That is exactly my line of thought. I bought myself a new pair of needles and some new yarn last night, I spent what I would normaly spend every Friday on cigs.

PM me if you want to quit together, extra support is always good!

margz3
03-11-2011, 10:14 AM
Good for you!! I keep up the good work :thumbsup:

TrueIconoclast
03-11-2011, 03:33 PM
How funny that you posted this right as I'm quitting smoking too lol.

I'm trying to use knitting to quit smoking, but it's actually more of a motivation. What I absolutely hate is when I'm working with a light colored yarn, and I forget to wash my hands after I've smoked, and 9 or 10 rows down I start to notice a pesky little nicotine stain on my yarn. I have to generally wash all of my projects after I'm done with them, because I knit for charity, and not only do I not want my stuff to have residual nicotine stains on them, but I also don't want to donate a whole bunch of smelly items (my apartment complex actually requires that we all smoke INDOORS because of the layout of the apartment, so all of my things smell like smoke, regardless). I know that a lot of homeless people smoke, but I prefer to leave it up to them to make their clothes smell like cigarettes if that's what they want lol.

Anyways, we're in it together!!!!

Also, here's a good tip: when I was in the hospital as a minor, they obviously wouldn't let me smoke. To counteract the withdrawals, they gave me 6 - 10 B complex vitamins a day. It was a little much, but if you take 2 B-Complex, it will help with the headaches and also the fatigue. You'll still have physical cravings, but at least you won't be doubled over in pain while falling asleep standing up lol.

TrueIconoclast
03-11-2011, 03:35 PM
I sympathize. I'm trying to cut down and hopefully quit. If it helps, think about all the yarn you could buy if you didn't buy cigarettes. Maybe a visit to Knitpicks' yarn section would be a good motivator.


OMG how doubly funny! I asked my boyfriend the other day, "So, if I really quit, can I get a few skeins of this cashmere/wool blend from knitpicks.com?"

$6 something for a skein of the above mentioned yarn......

ArtLady1981
03-11-2011, 07:14 PM
How much are cigarettes these days? (I haven't smoked since 1973) I guess I could google that...
just wait...I'll check....hmmm...:??

....well, it's hard to find...but this is what I saw for the State in which I live, and this was published in 2009:

May 4, 2009 ... A pack of premium cigarettes in Washington now costs at least $7, which adds up to more than $2500 a year for pack-a-day smokers...

Well what's my point already, you ask? I want you to go get yourself a piggie bank...and on every other day, instead of giving your cigarette money to Safeway, put $7 in your piggie bank. You smoke 1/2 pack a day? $3.50 a day by 2009 Washington State prices. Put that money in the piggie bank and call it your KNITTING & YARN FUND!

Use your smoking money to purchase quality yarn! Yarn that you wouldn't purchase anyways. Or, purchase a set of Addi CLICKS interchangeables! Or, purchase the full set of BOTH KnitPicks OPTIONS and Harmony's! Use your smoker money for a luxury knitting item! A wooden swift and ball winder! A professional blocking board! A new Namaste knitting bag!

Every time you use your new Addi CLICKS, or wooden swift & ball winder, or any LUXURY knitting item...think to yourself: "This could have gone up in smoke!"

If you are just 1/2 pack-a-day smoker, you will collect $105 in your YARN FUND each and every month! ($1,260 per year!) With that kind of knitting cash stash, you could really go hog wild at next year's Stitches, with classes and yarn!

I didn't mention anything about the health benefits of a non-smoking life. You know all that. Wish my mother had realized the benefits. She died at age 46 of smoker's lung cancer. It was ugly.

And best wishes to you and your resolve to quit smoking! :thumbsup: Your family will bless you for doing it for them, if not for yourself!

Now go get that piggie bank set up!

SBG
03-11-2011, 08:38 PM
I never smoked really, but knitting cured me of my lifelong nail biting habit.

Breezed
03-11-2011, 08:49 PM
I say never give up trying, even if this isn't your time to quit. Eventually, it will be if you really want it. I tried at least once a year for many years unsuccessfully. January 2011 made 2 years smoke-free for me!! I smoked for about 17 years, at least a pack a day. I quit using the prescription drug Chantix. It worked better than any other method I have ever tried and it didn't pump more nicotine into me while trying to quit the stuff. It does have side effects, but if you can afford it, it is worth it in the long term to deal with it. It worked so well for me that mentally I shut down to cigarette smoke. It actually makes me sick to stomach to even smell cigarettes now. I hear people say they quit 10+ yrs ago and still have cravings...NOT ME. I will never touch a cigarette again. You can do it!!!

Daylilydayzed
03-12-2011, 08:02 PM
Breezed,
I am so glad that you have quit smoking. I am a non smoker child of a smoking parent. My oldest child was born with kidney disease and birthdefects after I had to breathe 2nd hand smoke for the entire 9 months I was pregnant( I was in the US Navy at that time). I worked in an offoce where every one but me and one other girl, were chain smokers. My son is now almost 35 aand has had a kidney transplant to save his life. His birth defects were corrected before he started school.When he is clean shaven he looks like he is maybe 15 or 16 years old. Young female children under 13 years old are always asking him to go out with them. My son always says no, I am not a pediphile . When he was in his early 20's a eleven year old girl wanted to go out with him, he said no. She went and complained to her mother that my son would not go out with her. Her mother came to talk to me and I said my son is an adult , he does not date children. She did n;t belive he was an adult, I asked would she like to see his birth certificate. She then believed that he was as old as I said he was.

Woodi
03-13-2011, 03:45 PM
So glad that you're trying to quit smoking....I only smoked for 5 years in my twenties, but it took me another five years to quit, once I started....toughest thing I ever did.

but I didn't like the way I smelled when smoking; ciggy smoke infused all my clothes, hair, furniture....and how expensive! So many better ways to spend money. Chewing gum helped a lot, but staying away from my favorite cuppa coffee too....to break an addiction I always need to break other things that go with it....

when I gave up alcohol, I even had to drop a few friends who loved to hang out in bars. That was very very tough.

but today, I feel cleaner and healthier for it, and my hair smells great!

Breezed
03-13-2011, 06:17 PM
So glad that you're trying to quit smoking....I only smoked for 5 years in my twenties, but it took me another five years to quit, once I started....toughest thing I ever did.

but I didn't like the way I smelled when smoking; ciggy smoke infused all my clothes, hair, furniture....and how expensive! So many better ways to spend money. Chewing gum helped a lot, but staying away from my favorite cuppa coffee too....to break an addiction I always need to break other things that go with it....

when I gave up alcohol, I even had to drop a few friends who loved to hang out in bars. That was very very tough.

but today, I feel cleaner and healthier for it, and my hair smells great!

You are so right. Every time I changed a negative lifestyle habit, I had to give up several things. It's typically the environment that enables it to continue and makes it harder to give. I had to give up coffee for a while too when I quit smoking but now I can have my coffee and it has no relation to smoking anymore. And I also decided not to drink any alcohol, even in small quantities, and I had to give up a few friends along the way. They just weren't supportive and didn't try to understand I wasn't condemning others, I was making a healthier choice for MY body. They didn't get it so I said cya.

noseysheep
03-14-2011, 01:50 PM
I quit using the prescription drug Chantix. It worked better than any other method I have ever tried and it didn't pump more nicotine into me while trying to quit the stuff. It does have side effects, but if you can afford it, it is worth it in the long term to deal with it.

Oh my...my GP prescribed me Champix (same drug, different licensed name over here) to get me off cigs before a scheduled operation last year. Using will-power alone was failing me and patches actually burn me...literally within 20 mins of putting patch on I have a red square of burned skin underneath.:pout:

However...it just didn't work for me....on cigarettes anyway...continued to smoke like a trooper all the way through the course....absolute *no* side-effects from smoking whilst on Champix at all.:shrug:
However....after we gave up on Champix as a fix for my smoking habit....it took me about 6 weeks before I could even so much as sniff a cup of coffee :teehee: :teehee: :teehee:

Hubby stopped about 3 weeks ago,and I'm so proud of him :muah: . I've tried and failed to give-up on the last 3 Mondays...but I've 6 cigarettes left in my pack today, and my van won't start due to an annoying electrical fault....so no chance of getting in to town tonight or tomorrow for any more. So, maybe if I can get through tonight & tomorrow...I'll be on my way!:blooby:

My medical care team gave me the green light last week for us to start a family:sun: :woot: ...after we've been told for what feels like too long that we weren't allowed...and that is my newest motivation for stopping the ghastly, stinky things!:angelgrin: Crossed Fingers

But knitting does seem to be a great distraction from smoking - definitely the more I knit the less I smoke :cheering: :pray:

blueeyes28
03-14-2011, 02:07 PM
I taught myself to knit with the help of this website and a book almost 5 1/2 years ago to help me quit smoking and I am proud to say I have been smoke free ever since!:happydance:

Microwench
03-15-2011, 11:31 AM
Noseysheep, that is fantastic!!!! Baby-makin time is the perfect excuse to quit!

Just knit up a storm! Every free second, knit baby blankets and sweaters and booties and hats and toys! Everything you could possibly knit for a baby! You HAVE to quit for the bambino!

Oh that is so awesome!!:cheering:

crazykntter83
03-16-2011, 03:05 AM
I've been trying to quit for about a year now, and have started back up twice. I'm about to give up on quiting, I don't think it's the right time for me. Good luck in ya'lls attempts though. :)

okckwilter
03-16-2011, 05:46 PM
I've been trying to quit for about a year now, and have started back up twice. I'm about to give up on quiting, I don't think it's the right time for me. Good luck in ya'lls attempts though. :)

I'm glad to know that I'm not the only one who can't quite manage to quit. The best advice I've been given is to just keep trying and it WILL click sooner or later! Best of luck to you, too!

Breezed
03-16-2011, 06:26 PM
crazykntter83, never say you're giving up. Just say it didn't work this time. You will try again another time. Always end with maybe next time.

Congratulations to all of the other quitters out there and good luck to those that are trying. You can do it.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-16-2011, 07:21 PM
I just found out I'm going to be a grandma. My daughter's expecting. Lots of baby things to knit to keep my mind off cigs and a good motivation. Stopping cold turkey seems daunting. I did this months ago with the overeating. I knew I couldn't stop snacking, so I gradually cut down. I went from mowing down a whole bag to only half a bag, now none at all. Just got a new pair of work pants today. I've dropped 45 pounds and went from a size 24 to an 18 so far. If I can do it with food, I guess I can do it with the smoking, too. Thanks for the motivation, all. It means a lot.

crazykntter83
03-16-2011, 11:24 PM
I just found out I'm going to be a grandma. My daughter's expecting. Lots of baby things to knit to keep my mind off cigs and a good motivation. Stopping cold turkey seems daunting. I did this months ago with the overeating. I knew I couldn't stop snacking, so I gradually cut down. I went from mowing down a whole bag to only half a bag, now none at all. Just got a new pair of work pants today. I've dropped 45 pounds and went from a size 24 to an 18 so far. If I can do it with food, I guess I can do it with the smoking, too. Thanks for the motivation, all. It means a lot.
The only thing with quiting cold turkey is that you're going to want to snack a lot more. Every time that I run out of my lozenges, and I'm nicking, I want snacks like crazy! I think it might have something to do with the oral fixation or something.
Thanks ya'll for the support. Maybe next time I will succeed, but it's just not gonna be anytime soon. The simple fact is, I enjoy smoking, and I don't think I was really ready to quit to begin with.

Jan in CA
03-17-2011, 12:59 AM
Good luck to you all! When my DH turned 35 he said enough! and never looked back. :thumbsup:

Remember that quitting smoking also makes your yarn smell better as well as your house and hair. The lack of second hand smoke will also help those you love as well as yourself. :hug:

Breezed
03-17-2011, 10:48 AM
I just found out I'm going to be a grandma. My daughter's expecting. Lots of baby things to knit to keep my mind off cigs and a good motivation. Stopping cold turkey seems daunting. I did this months ago with the overeating. I knew I couldn't stop snacking, so I gradually cut down. I went from mowing down a whole bag to only half a bag, now none at all. Just got a new pair of work pants today. I've dropped 45 pounds and went from a size 24 to an 18 so far. If I can do it with food, I guess I can do it with the smoking, too. Thanks for the motivation, all. It means a lot.

Congrats on the weight loss! That's definitely hard to do. What a great motivator - a new baby! You can do it! :cheering:

When I quit smoking, I did snack a lot and I gained about 15lbs. I managed to somewhat keep it under control but I wasn't overweight to start so 15lbs was way too much for me. It could have been worse. 2 yrs later I'm starting to lose the weight by light exercise and eating better, and less junk of course.

JLonier
03-20-2011, 01:32 PM
Quitting smoking is how I learned needle point about 10 years ago, but knitting certainly would have worked too. Anything to keep your hand occupied and mind off it. Best of luck!

TrueIconoclast
03-20-2011, 03:01 PM
The only thing with quiting cold turkey is that you're going to want to snack a lot more. Every time that I run out of my lozenges, and I'm nicking, I want snacks like crazy! I think it might have something to do with the oral fixation or something.
Thanks ya'll for the support. Maybe next time I will succeed, but it's just not gonna be anytime soon. The simple fact is, I enjoy smoking, and I don't think I was really ready to quit to begin with.

The reason you get so hungry is because the tobacco companies add sugar to the cigarettes to make them more addicting. When you quit smoking, your blood sugar level decreases from what your body is used to, so you replace the sugar in the cigarettes with sugar in food.

bambi
03-20-2011, 09:35 PM
I have never been a smoker so I can't say I know what it is like to quit but quitting is the single best thing you can do for your own health and for the health of those around you absolutely! I am a nurse practitioner.

Here are a few tips from others that I picked up to tell my patients.

WAIT 5! If you have a craving, wait 5 minutes for one week. If you can do that, increase it to 10, etc. When you can wait 60, you can quit.

DOGGY BAG it! Put your allotment of cigs for one day in a zip top bag (ie start with 10). Do whatever you can to get by on those cigs..smoke half and put it back if you need to. Cut your allotment down by 1 cig every week until there are none.

Good luck to you all who are trying to quit and congrats to those who already have. You can be a quitter and love it!

N0obKnitter
03-27-2011, 08:48 PM
I haven't ever been a smoker but my mom was. She got The Patch and has been smoke-free since. My mom is a cross-stitch uh, addict (putting it mildly) so she allocated the $ she used to waste on cancer sticks to building her Xstitch stash hahaha. It's absurd now - her stash I mean. :D

busyknitmom
04-08-2011, 05:53 PM
I quit smoking 3 weeks ago. I should say I quit again, I can't tell you all how many times I have quit and then not quit. Or quit quitting. Knitting is what has done it this time. I would have $105 for these three weeks but part of that has been spent on nicotine gum. I have cut down on that though too, replacing it with regular gum. I tell myself just knit for 15 minutes and by that time I am done with the craving. I'll even set the timer sometimes and by the time it goes off, I can go on with something else or keep knitting.

Anyway, this time has been totally different. I can tell I am never going to smoke again. I can't explain it, I just feel it this time. Every other time, I felt like I was giving up something, this time I don't feel like I am losing anything.

Snugglebugmom
04-19-2011, 08:27 PM
I quit smoking a little over six weeks ago, and have been knitting up a storm ever since! Instead of going out for a smoke (we never smoked inside, always outside only), I sit and knit a few rows. As much as I miss it at times, I am so happy that I am no longer a smoker. I can think of dozens of reasons not to smoke... but not one good reason to smoke. Other than "I enjoy it" and that just doesn't cut it anymore.
And I am pregnant, so that is a major motivator as well. :)