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Olha
08-04-2011, 12:13 AM
Have you ever timed yourself?

The question was triggered by an observation that I like to knit slowly. After I got a bit more efficient, the process became more important than the result. And even though rushing makes me more stressed, it seemed like a waste of time to do it slower than possible, right?

So I timed myself to see how much time I 'waste' exactly. Surprising result -- I knit about 19 stitches in 20 seconds if I try to do it fast but even if I slow down, it's still 14 stitches in 20 second in St st. To double check, did it again in a faster mode, was struggling with one stitch that was trying to escape and got only 16 stitches in 20 sec.

Verdict: rushing is not worth it :)

What is your experience?

TrikkeAddict
08-04-2011, 07:23 AM
I've never timed myself - all I know is that when I'm tired it feels like I'm knitting in slow motion, when I concentrate on what I'm doing I knit slowly, and when I'm watching television and not paying attention I knit faster. :)

crazykntter83
08-04-2011, 09:24 AM
I've never timed myself or anything, but I think I'm a pretty steady knitter under normal circumstances. If I'm more tired, then I tend to go pretty slow. And for some odd reason, I've noticed that I can purl a lot faster that I can knit.

suzeeq
08-04-2011, 10:02 AM
I don't time myself either. I just started a project on size 17s with worsted weight and I go a lot slower than with size 11s or smaller because the tips are short and hard to hold on to. But I'm pretty fast on regular size needles (9 to 13s)

trvvn5
08-04-2011, 12:25 PM
I've never timed myself either. But I have definately noticed that I have a comfortable speed and when I try to push beyond that I start making mistakes and have to go back and redo things anyway. So, I completely agree. Pushing to go faster just isn't worth it.

nonny2t
08-04-2011, 01:08 PM
That's unusual. Most people slow way down purling.


I've never timed myself or anything, but I think I'm a pretty steady knitter under normal circumstances. If I'm more tired, then I tend to go pretty slow. And for some odd reason, I've noticed that I can purl a lot faster that I can knit.

nonny2t
08-04-2011, 01:09 PM
People have told me I knit fast, but frankly, I don't see it. I am a lefty so I have to change things quite abit to read patterns and such, slows you down. I can whiz right through something if I listen to an audiobook though, which I think is funny.

Wanda Witch
08-04-2011, 01:49 PM
I've never timed myself but I notice when I first pick up the work (usually at the beginning of a row) I am a tad slower until I get out of second gear into high. I wish I could purl as fast as I knit but that is slower as I watch it more closely, I guess. If I try to 'hurry up' I know I will make boo-boos and tinking is not fun. So, relax and enjoy the ride.

suzeeq
08-04-2011, 02:33 PM
That's unusual. Most people slow way down purling.

Not necessarily, depends on which style you do. I knit english and I think my purling may go a tad faster than knits; I can see where combo style might be faster on the purls too.

Olha
08-04-2011, 06:08 PM
Not necessarily, depends on which style you do. I knit english and I think my purling may go a tad faster than knits; I can see where combo style might be faster on the purls too.
I purl faster than knit too... and I use continental style. It might be considered 'wrong' in North America, however it is OK in Europe. I checked educational videos to make sure :) So, I knit through the back loop (my mom calls them 'legs' as if the stitch is standing over the needle:)) and move the yarn behind the stitch that is worked. My stitches are sitting differently on the needle as well, the back loop is closer than the front loop... I am not sure where I am going with that :) Anyway, I think the purl movement is simpler in my case, so yeah, it's possible.

suzeeq
08-04-2011, 06:10 PM
You actually knit a 'combined' style (http://www.anniemodesitt.com), not standard continental in which the leg closest to the needle tip is in front. But that's okay and yeah, probably why you purl faster too.

Olha
08-04-2011, 10:04 PM
hooray! thanks! Now my style has a name and surprisingly it's not 'the wrong style'! :)

I have this idea for a video -- what if a few knitters with different styles took turns knitting the same piece (a swatch), would the stitches look different? (other than possibly different tension?)

crazykntter83
08-04-2011, 10:10 PM
I don't know why I'm faster at the purl stitch. I didn't learn it til late December of last year. I think I make my knit stitches a bit looser than I do the purl stitch, and it's just easier for me. I thought it was pretty unusual myself. Oh and I knit continental. :)

fatoldladyinpjs
08-04-2011, 10:17 PM
Olha, you may be knitting Eastern European style. Does it look like this?
http://www.yarnsoftheheart.com/2008/05/how-to-knit-eastern-european-style_03.html

Olha
08-04-2011, 10:44 PM
Well, since I am from Eastern Europe, there might be something to it ;) I just never saw anything other then English or Continental on most popular tutorials...

fatoldladyinpjs
08-04-2011, 10:53 PM
You won't find much about it on the internet. I had to really dig to find it. From what I read, Eastern European is the oldest form of knitting, dating back to 200 a.d. I thought I was the only one who knitted that way on this forum. Sistah! lol

Olha
08-04-2011, 11:07 PM
Hello, sistah! :) How did you learn it then if you don't mind me asking? I mean, in my country knitters use it just because it was passed from one generation to another, teachers use it, it's in books and magazines and such. I don't assume anything about people's backgrounds, just curious if you chose it for any reason over other styles. (Are we still within the topic?) :)

fatoldladyinpjs
08-04-2011, 11:17 PM
I just sent you a private email.

suzeeq
08-04-2011, 11:19 PM
It probably wouldn't look any different as long as the sts weren't twisted.

Yeah, Russian is another form of how you knit. Thanks to the internet, these 'alternate' styles are becoming more widely known. And we're quite on topic, which style you knit can affect your speed or effectiveness in knitting or purling.

Olha
08-04-2011, 11:59 PM
I watched the popular video of the fastest knitter and -- because her hands just turn into blurr :)-- couldn't tell what style she was using. Does anyone know?

suzeeq
08-05-2011, 12:03 AM
There's a couple that hold the 'fastest knitter' title. One uses standard continental, the other english style.

Olha
08-05-2011, 12:31 AM
I am talking about this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2E-IDIAGGo

And it should be mentioned that the knitter in this video is Miriam Tegels. Normally I don't refer to people by pronouns only :)

fatoldladyinpjs
08-05-2011, 08:02 AM
She's a continental knitter.

Jan in CA
08-05-2011, 11:19 AM
I am talking about this one http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2E-IDIAGGo


The video says it's continental and you can see the yarn in her left hand.

I don't think of myself as a fast knitter, but I do okay. I'm fine with that, I don't need to set any speed records. :lol:

suzeeq
08-05-2011, 11:24 AM
That lady knits standard continental. There's a woman in Canada who's the fastest in N America and she knits english style. I think there's a video of her linked to the other one.

Breezed
08-05-2011, 01:04 PM
That lady knits standard continental. There's a woman in Canada who's the fastest in N America and she knits english style. I think there's a video of her linked to the other one.

Just for the record, I knit slooowwwwww. At least it seems like it most of the time. I've only been knitting a year so I'm hoping I haven't reached my peak speed. lol

I typically knit English, but still trying to conquer Continental. I purl faster using English. I think it's because I can hold and throw faster with the yarn in front. I can barely purl using Continental, I just can't get the idea of "dropping" my finger to let it wrap kinda thingy that it does. It just flubs me up sometimes.

suzeeq
08-05-2011, 01:32 PM
You don't have to learn continental, it really isn't faster than english style. What is 'faster' for you is using productive motions and getting more comfortable with it through practice. As you've found, simply switching methods doesn't make it automatically faster, you need to find a way of knitting that involves small hand motions that are easy for you. Quite a few people do knit continental and purl english though.

crazykntter83
08-05-2011, 02:27 PM
To me, the main thing is, you just have to do what works for you. What feels the most "natural" to you? Answer that question, and use that. You'll get faster with time, but it's not the speed that matters. It just matters that you're enjoying what you're doing and that you come out with a product that you are satisfied with. Good luck!! :)

Breezed
08-05-2011, 06:34 PM
I must've hit quote instead of just reply on my last post...oops.

I know speed doesn't really matter...but the faster I can knit without error, the more yarn I can buy to make new stuff! Just saying it gets me excited. I love buying yarn! If I didn't have a lot of self control, I'd turn into a yarn hoarder. I also just want to learn Continental to be able to use either method when one way gets tiring. I would also later on in life like to be able to learn and use many methods. Just to brag and say I can!

suzeeq
08-05-2011, 06:38 PM
It's not a hoard, we call them stashes and it's perfectly acceptable, we all have them. You can even take them out and pet them if you want so they don't get lonely. Most of us also have more than one project going at a time.

Breezed
08-05-2011, 07:01 PM
It's not a hoard, we call them stashes and it's perfectly acceptable, we all have them. You can even take them out and pet them if you want so they don't get lonely. Most of us also have more than one project going at a time.

:rofl: crazy yarn people! I do tend to go in the spare room and just look at it.

Olha
08-05-2011, 07:58 PM
:rofl: crazy yarn people! I do tend to go in the spare room and just look at it.

You can even take them out and pet them if you want so they don't get lonely.

LOL! As my friend would put it -- you and your yarn! :)

TreshaRuthe
08-05-2011, 08:07 PM
It's not a hoard, we call them stashes and it's perfectly acceptable, we all have them. You can even take them out and pet them if you want so they don't get lonely. Most of us also have more than one project going at a time.

:rofl: crazy yarn people! I do tend to go in the spare room and just look at it.

Hey!! I represent that remark! I guess that makes us "Lambs of a wool" instead of "birds of a feather"?

Olha
08-05-2011, 08:53 PM
OK, if anyone is still interested, that's how I knit

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYZd7CvLERc&feature=related

and purl

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eV2EbeufLHY&feature=related

In this video it's called traditional Russian method. The instructions are in English but a bit slow so you might want to start somewhere in the middle of both videos to get to 'the action' part :)

All other videos I've seen so far are slightly different in the way the yarn is held or wrapped around the right needle. Those guys even published a book on the method but their website doesn't seem to be very lively and the book is sold out

http://www.headwaterwool.com/BookDetail.aspx?row_num=4

Olha
08-05-2011, 09:12 PM
. I thought I was the only one who knitted that way on this forum. Sistah! lol

And we are not alone, there is a group of 1000 (random!) knitters on Ravelry in Russian Technique Group

http://www.ravelry.com/groups/russian-knitting-technique

fatoldladyinpjs
08-06-2011, 10:28 AM
Unfortunately, we're not sisters. :( Eastern European knitting is different than Russian or Combined. Looks like I'm still the oddball around here. *sigh*

TreshaRuthe
08-06-2011, 12:09 PM
Unfortunately, we're not sisters. :( Eastern European knitting is different than Russian or Combined. Looks like I'm still the oddball around here. *sigh*

You're not as alone as you think... Do you remember when I asked this:

Okay, so I was just re-watching the knit cast-on and watching the purl video when Amy said something that jumped out at me.... she specified which direction to wrap your yarn around your needle... Now here's my question, I hold my rhn like it's a crochet hook almost, and wrap it in much the same manner. In crochet, which direction you wrap your yarn around your hook doesn't really matter as long as you get it there. In knitting, does it matter which direction your wrap your yarn around your needle as long as you are moving a loop of yarn in the right direction?

Well, based on watching this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9OdK39Y0WjI) I was actually knitting Eastern European and just didn't know it. At the time I asked the above question I was using the knit cast on and doing what she showed in the video I linked...

And for the record I knit Eastern European faster than I knit Continental, and knit faster than I purl, and crochet faster than I knit because of more practice...


(I had to google Eastern European cause the curiosity was killing me to not know what it was, guess it was a good thing I did.)

Jan in CA
08-06-2011, 01:18 PM
Most knitters also have a disease called SABLE. That means Stash Enhancement Beyond Life Expectancy. Although many people have tried it's very hard to cure completely. Why, I just bought more yarn that I didn't need last night! :doh:

TreshaRuthe
08-06-2011, 02:02 PM
Shh! Don't say that out loud, our husbands might hear. Then where would we be when they say we don't need that new wonderfully lucious yarn that we just can't resist?

fatoldladyinpjs
08-06-2011, 09:41 PM
See, I'm a single independent woman. I can buy all the yarn I want with no one to answer to for it. lol

TreshaRuthe
08-06-2011, 10:39 PM
Well, I have a 1950's style marriage (which is a fantastic thing). He loves putting me on my pedastal, spoiling me rotten, keeping me at home on the couch eating bon bons, and I love sending him off to work and such. He is extremely indulgent when it comes to my crafts taking up 80ish% of the house, but even my sainted husband has his limits.

suzeeq
08-06-2011, 11:03 PM
See, I'm a single independent woman. I can buy all the yarn I want with no one to answer to for it. lol

Same here! :cheering:

Olha
08-06-2011, 11:52 PM
Unfortunately, we're not sisters. :( Eastern European knitting is different than Russian or Combined. Looks like I'm still the oddball around here. *sigh*

For the sake of the knitting style argument, I would have to agree. But my philosophy is that all knitters are somehow related :)

Just out of curiosity, where does this mysterious Eastern European style come from? There is only a handful of countries in Eastern Europe, so if you eliminate European part of Russia, Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova as knitting 'Russian' or Combined style (of which I am almost 100% sure), where to look for it? We only have Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia left. Population wise it's 200 millions vs about 50 millions. I just wonder if any of those small countries actually deserves credit for it :)

And maybe it's not easy to do research because the name refers to a much larger region where this style, in fact, is not practiced by the majority of population.

Breezed
08-07-2011, 07:57 AM
Well, I have a 1950's style marriage (which is a fantastic thing). He loves putting me on my pedastal, spoiling me rotten, keeping me at home on the couch eating bon bons, and I love sending him off to work and such. He is extremely indulgent when it comes to my crafts taking up 80ish% of the house, but even my sainted husband has his limits.

That's awesome. You are one of the lucky ones, like me. My bf is supportive and loving as well. He is the one who encouraged me to learn, and he praises every single project I do, whether it sucks or not. He is great.

SDK
08-08-2011, 12:38 PM
Well, I have a 1950's style marriage (which is a fantastic thing). He loves putting me on my pedastal, spoiling me rotten, keeping me at home on the couch eating bon bons, and I love sending him off to work and such. He is extremely indulgent when it comes to my crafts taking up 80ish% of the house, but even my sainted husband has his limits.
I have a 1950's style marriage, too, but my husband flatly insists I finish a project and have the plans for the next before I buy any yarn that isn't 100% cotton for dishcloths. I think he knows me too well. :)

I'm getting good at squares.

NorthernIrelandKnitter
08-09-2011, 06:29 AM
I don't knit all that quickly, but not too slowly either. I find if I try to go faster, I make mistakes. I knit English style, since that is the way I learned. I have tried Continental, but couldn't get my head - or fingers? - around it. I suppose with practice I could get faster and get my head around Continental knitting lol.

Gillian

Antares
08-11-2011, 10:41 AM
I don't knit very fast (compared to how quickly I can crochet at any rate). In fact, when I was first learning to knit, I became very very frustrated because about an hour into the project, I would be thinking, "I could have had this crocheted about 45 minutes ago!"

For this reason, I wished I had learned to knit FIRST!

Anyway, now I know how to knit two ways: regular continental (which I use for lace knitting) and combination knitting (which I use for projects without a lot of increases/decreases). And generally I have AT LEAST 2 or 3 projects going (using both methods). So far, I haven't had any trouble switching back and forth between them.

And let's not even talk about my yarn stash! Although I will say this, whatever you do, DON'T organize it! After I organized mine, my husband said, "I had NO IDEA you had so much yarn!" Oops!