PDA

View Full Version : yay happy me!


ad2knit
04-07-2013, 06:26 PM
I can knit!!! Well at least i hope so, lets not jinx it.

Anyway yesterday I went on Youtube and just searched how to hold yarn knitting or something like that and came across this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLwuA2u1--0&list=WL6FD1FAB063F68939) and I thought " Oh my god maybe that's the problem" So I got my knitting needles and just tried to hold the yarn like the video shows and yay after doing so I felt no strain in my right hand and started knitting a bit more and yay no pain anywhere!!! Yay me!!!

Well sort of. While there is no pain anywhere on my right, somehow I am straining my left hand, although i dont really use my left hand much so how i'm straining it I have no idea. I have tried to hold the needle on my left a bit looser but i'm not sure if its helping much...any tips?


but the good news is yay I can knit now :) no pain - sort of lol! Yay! And it means no doctor visit either - I hope!

PS I know i've been going on about my hands since i joined up here, sorry! I promise this is the last hand thread..well again ,I hope!

Jan in CA
04-07-2013, 07:06 PM
Yay! I wrap it little bit differently, but it's still English method. How have you been holding the yarn? Left hand or right? I can knit continental (left), but I still find English easier.

salmonmac
04-07-2013, 07:26 PM
Ah, good. I'm glad you've found something that works. Enjoy your knitting!

justplaincharlotte
04-07-2013, 08:27 PM
I can knit!!! Well at least i hope so, lets not jinx it.

Anyway yesterday I went on Youtube and just searched how to hold yarn knitting or something like that and came across this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLwuA2u1--0&list=WL6FD1FAB063F68939) and I thought " Oh my god maybe that's the problem" So I got my knitting needles and just tried to hold the yarn like the video shows and yay after doing so I felt no strain in my right hand and started knitting a bit more and yay no pain anywhere!!! Yay me!!!

Well sort of. While there is no pain anywhere on my right, somehow I am straining my left hand, although i dont really use my left hand much so how i'm straining it I have no idea. I have tried to hold the needle on my left a bit looser but i'm not sure if its helping much...any tips?


but the good news is yay I can knit now :) no pain - sort of lol! Yay! And it means no doctor visit either - I hope!

PS I know i've been going on about my hands since i joined up here, sorry! I promise this is the last hand thread..well again ,I hope!
Congratulations on finding a method that helps with your right hand pain!:woohoo:

If you're holding the needles the same way as in the video, and you're naturally right handed, it may just be that your left hand musculature is getting exercised in a way it's not used to.

You may want to take breaks to rest that left hand just as you would rest your legs when walking more than you're accustomed to doing. Endurance will come.

Jan in CA
04-07-2013, 09:20 PM
Just for the record since it often comes up...I'm right handed and was a crocheter, but I still am happy and quite fast when I want to be with English knitting. :thumbsup:

ad2knit
04-08-2013, 08:20 AM
Yay! I wrap it little bit differently, but it's still English method. How have you been holding the yarn? Left hand or right? I can knit continental (left), but I still find English easier.

English is def easier for me. Tried continental but its not easy when you are a righty lol. show me how you do it?

Congratulations on finding a method that helps with your right hand pain!:woohoo:

If you're holding the needles the same way as in the video, and you're naturally right handed, it may just be that your left hand musculature is getting exercised in a way it's not used to.

You may want to take breaks to rest that left hand just as you would rest your legs when walking more than you're accustomed to doing. Endurance will come.

Spoke too soon!!! Index finger pain is baaaack doh! I jinxed it. Maybe I should go back to trying knitting with bamboo?

Antares
04-08-2013, 08:40 AM
So sorry that didn't work for you either. But there are lots of ways to hold the yarn and needles and to knit. Check out this video of a woman who does Portuguese knitting (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzfYS9_t27k). She claims it requires very few hand movements, so perhaps it will work for you. If not, there are other methods to try. Take a look on YouTube and see what you find.

ad2knit
04-08-2013, 09:17 AM
So sorry that didn't work for you either. But there are lots of ways to hold the yarn and needles and to knit. Check out this video of a woman who does Portuguese knitting (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzfYS9_t27k). She claims it requires very few hand movements, so perhaps it will work for you. If not, there are other methods to try. Take a look on YouTube and see what you find. I will knit! LOL!

I'm gonna see if working with Bamboo is better...or maybe I should buy circs....

N0obKnitter
04-08-2013, 10:42 AM
I'm right handed and I can't knit American/English style if you put a gun to my head.

I've started trying to crochet, too.

GrumpyGramma
04-08-2013, 11:26 AM
I'm right handed and I can't knit American/English style if you put a gun to my head.

I've started trying to crochet, too.


I don't think handedness, right or left, or crocheting first has much to do with the preferred method for knitting. I'm right handed, crocheted for years, couldn't manage to knit English, didn't know there was another way and kept trying to knit more like I crochet and then found out it's Continental knitting. Others who crochet first prefer English style. Here's something to throw into the mix, I'm left eye dominant and most right handed people are right eye dominant or so said my optometrist. Maybe that's why my right hand has a hard time tensioning and not dropping the yarn. Probably totally irrelevant! My point is, we can find all kinds of explanations for why one person knits one way and the other knits the other way but all that really matters is: Do you knit? Do you enjoy it? I can now knit English style and sort of purl English style, knowing both comes in handy.

ad2knit
04-08-2013, 01:34 PM
I don't think handedness, right or left, or crocheting first has much to do with the preferred method for knitting. I'm right handed, crocheted for years, couldn't manage to knit English, didn't know there was another way and kept trying to knit more like I crochet and then found out it's Continental knitting. Others who crochet first prefer English style. Here's something to throw into the mix, I'm left eye dominant and most right handed people are right eye dominant or so said my optometrist. Maybe that's why my right hand has a hard time tensioning and not dropping the yarn. Probably totally irrelevant! My point is, we can find all kinds of explanations for why one person knits one way and the other knits the other way but all that really matters is: Do you knit? Do you enjoy it? I can now knit English style and sort of purl English style, knowing both comes in handy.

I think the only reason I CAN'T knit continental is due to my CP. I have mild CP and my left side of my body (my leg and my arm) is like, the weakest, so trying to knit continental doesn't come easy for me.

I guess I'm going to try the bamboo needles again (I've said that 3 times now, feel free to throw a ball of yarn at my head) and If there are still problems I am going to have to go to the doctor see if theres any thing wrong with my stupid hands and then I'm going to see if he can refer me to anyone like a hand therapist or someone who can help me continue to stop knitting..if there is such a person........

Jan in CA
04-08-2013, 02:16 PM
Try everything you can. Circs with a flexible cable so you're not fighting it (Knitpicks, Webs, etc.). The cables that look like their made with weed whacker cable are to stiff. Also bamboo may help because it's softer and warmer than metal.

ad2knit
04-08-2013, 02:46 PM
Try everything you can. Circs with a flexible cable so you're not fighting it (Knitpicks, Webs, etc.). The cables that look like their made with weed whacker cable are to stiff. Also bamboo may help because it's softer and warmer than metal.

I feel awful..my sis bought me all these plastic needles for christmas 2 years ago.....now i may actuallly not be able to use them :(

Jan in CA
04-08-2013, 05:13 PM
They are good to learn on, but I'd give something else a try. KP has a try it set with one of each type which is a good way to test them. Many people prefer the bamboo for arthritic hands because its naturally warmer. I think circs are more comfortable than straights. They hurt my hands for more than a few minutes, too.

GrumpyGramma
04-08-2013, 06:15 PM
What Jan said. I think Harmony or Sunstruck from KP or their counterparts from WEBS might have some of the qualities of bamboo as far as being warmer goes, but are smoother and a little more like the metal ones in that regard. A bit of the best of both?

jinxnit55
04-08-2013, 11:19 PM
There are people called occupational therapists who your doctor can refer you to. They can help you strengthen your hands, if it comes down to that. I saw one when I had a complicated finger fracture, and my favorite part was when she put my hand in a warm paraffin bath, and then massaged it! Yow! It was awesome!

ad2knit
04-09-2013, 07:32 AM
There are people called occupational therapists who your doctor can refer you to. They can help you strengthen your hands, if it comes down to that. I saw one when I had a complicated finger fracture, and my favorite part was when she put my hand in a warm paraffin bath, and then massaged it! Yow! It was awesome!

I know this sounds stupid, but I feel a little silly walking into the GP and going "Hi yeah my hands hurt from knitting. Refer me to Occupational Therapy wont you?"

Just to add:tried the bamboo and all i can say is they dont help either. aaah

Jan in CA
04-09-2013, 11:17 AM
We're the bamboo straight needles?

ad2knit
04-09-2013, 12:10 PM
We're the bamboo straight needles?

Hi Jan - yep. Straight 4.5 mm bamboo needles.

amy
04-09-2013, 03:05 PM
Ad2knit, I admire your perseverance!
You're getting lots of good suggestions here. I hope something can work for you!

I think Jan is onto something, if you are using straight needles. Try a 24" long circular needle, which you can use like a straight needle, but requires less torque. With a straight needle, much of the weight of the knitting ends up down the shaft of the needle, and with every stitch you are lifting that weight, which is made more difficult because of it jutting out from the hand. Circular needles carry the weight of your knitting on your lap, relieving much strain on your hands. I suggest a 24" length because then you will have a needle shaft that is long enough to hold easily. The shorter shafts of the 16" needles require a modified hold for most knitters, which might be a strain for your hands.

Still, I'm wondering: is there another root source of your pain? Different causes require different solutions. If it's arthritis in your index finger, for instance, you may need to address that directly. (Grumpy Grandma, did you say you take turmeric for inflammation?) A modified yarn or needle hold may be in order, as you have tried. Another idea, and it doesn't seem to me like index finger pain would necessarily benefit from these, but check these (http://www.schoolhousepress.com/tools.htm) out (scroll down to the bottom of page).



Try everything you can. Circs with a flexible cable so you're not fighting it (Knitpicks, Webs, etc.). The cables that look like their made with weed whacker cable are to stiff. Also bamboo may help because it's softer and warmer than metal.

GrumpyGramma
04-09-2013, 04:34 PM
(Grumpy Grandma, did you say you take turmeric for inflammation?)

Yes. I started taking it to see if it would help a skin condition and it did and I noticed my knees and hands were less likely to bother me. I recently started taking coconut oil and my knees and hands bothered me even less and I've cut back on the turmeric. I was taking 4, 500 mg caps a day, now I'm down to 2 caps a day, and I may try going lower. I'm thinking of upping the coconut from about 1 tbs. once a day to 1 tbs. twice a day. I'm able to do deep knee bends w/o any real complaints from my knees and the skin problem hasn't resurfaced yet. I think I could crochet again should I choose, my hands don't complain like they used to. As it may have influence on how the turmeric and coconut oil work for me, I think I should add that I cannot take pain medications unless absolutely necessary. Tylenol doesn't seem to do anything pain-wise so even though I've not noticed problems with it, I don't use it. Ibuprofen and Excedrin make me high with a downer after that I wouldn't wish on my worst enemy (whoever that might be, I've not a clue). More than about 4 aspirin in a month makes my ears ring. Things with codiene? Only if I don't care to function at all. As you might guess, I can use all the alternative help I can get and self-medicating is about my only option. Drugs and I do not mix well.

One more thing, I've eliminated all liquid dairy and cheese from my diet and have started reading labels to avoid things that contain whey, etc. Now if I consume dairy products, I feel more pain again.

justplaincharlotte
04-09-2013, 09:44 PM
So sorry that didn't work for you either. But there are lots of ways to hold the yarn and needles and to knit. Check out this video of a woman who does Portuguese knitting (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzfYS9_t27k). She claims it requires very few hand movements, so perhaps it will work for you. If not, there are other methods to try. Take a look on YouTube and see what you find.

Antares - you beat me to it! Portuguese does require far fewer hand movements, and is much much easier on the hands and fingers than English, well except for the left thumb, but most of us have much stronger thumbs than fingers anyway.

A plus if you try this method ad2knit: don't feel obligated to buy a knitting pin, you can tension the yarn around your neck, or if you have one, you can use a coilless safety pin instead of a knitting pin. Just a tip from a dedicated portuguese knitter!:heart:

ad2knit
04-10-2013, 11:07 AM
Tried having a go at continental again but thats made my left index hurty now.....guess a GP visit is def on the cards...must tell someone to hide my knitting in the meantime - keep wanting to knit grrr.

GrumpyGramma
04-10-2013, 12:48 PM
When knitting continental, how do you hold your yarn? Thinking back to when I started knitting and my fingers hurt...I held the yarn in a choke hold and it didn't move easily between my fingers and was tight around my index finger. I learned to hold it more loosely and to move my finger holding the yarn less by rocking my hand forward to do purls so I could pick the stitch with the right needle and have minimal movement with my index finger, then rock my left hand so that the yarn is in back for knits. If you're using your left finger to wrap the yarn around the needle you might try picking instead. This Continental knitting demo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuRLFl36tDY) is as close as I can come to finding a video to show what I'm talking about. That's how I hold my yarn now and with everything looser there is much less strain on my hands and fingers. Still, I typically move my index finger less than in the way she shows.

ad2knit
04-10-2013, 01:11 PM
When knitting continental, how do you hold your yarn? Thinking back to when I started knitting and my fingers hurt...I held the yarn in a choke hold and it didn't move easily between my fingers and was tight around my index finger. I learned to hold it more loosely and to move my finger holding the yarn less by rocking my hand forward to do purls so I could pick the stitch with the right needle and have minimal movement with my index finger, then rock my left hand so that the yarn is in back for knits. If you're using your left finger to wrap the yarn around the needle you might try picking instead. This Continental knitting demo (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuRLFl36tDY) is as close as I can come to finding a video to show what I'm talking about. That's how I hold my yarn now and with everything looser there is much less strain on my hands and fingers. Still, I typically move my index finger less than in the way she shows.

I'm knitting how the video on Knitting Help shows....so...yeah...I think i'm doing it right.

Oh i sincerely hope i dont have arthiritis. I'm actually scared to go to the docs :(

Edited to add: how can i poss have arthiritis anyway - I'm 33! thats something you get in your 50-s-60s!

Jan in CA
04-10-2013, 02:00 PM
Nope, even young people can get arthritis although it is more common in older people. I think because you're new you've probably got other issues like holding the yarn to tight, knitting tight, and the stress of learning which tightens you up.

GrumpyGramma
04-10-2013, 02:12 PM
It's not a matter of right or wrong, just what works. If it works then it's right. I really hope you figure this thing out.

ad2knit
04-10-2013, 02:12 PM
Nope, even young people can get arthritis although it is more common in older people. I think because you're new you've probably got other issues like holding the yarn to tight, knitting tight, and the stress of learning which tightens you up.

Well technically I'm not new...i just started up again after a year due to the same sort of problem 2 years ago (see my blog!)

That being said though when I first started knitting I had no issuues..then it came to when I learnt how to knit socks the issues started - and i blame those blooming DPN's....that's why i stopped the knitting in the first place even though when i went to see the doctor the last time she was all like "oh no you don't WANT to stop knitting in fact its good for the hands" and just prescribed me ibuprofen gel. Urgh I don't know what to do...shall i just leave the knitting alone until i get advice?

Off topic Jan...how do you get the ravelry buttons up? I'm trying to add one to my blooming blog!
Speaking of the blog i'm thinking of changing the name...I'm hardly a knit - a holic really am i? Any ideas?

Jan in CA
04-10-2013, 03:46 PM
Uh...I know nothing about how to put one on a blog. Probably save the image to your computer same as you do for other links. I'll find the link for images in a few minutes.

Ahhh...I can't knit with those tiny needles and that tighter tension required for socks for long or my hands are bothered, too. I've got socks size 0 circs right now and it's taking forever so I've got multiple projects going. My preferred needle sizes are 5-8. I can knit for hours as long as I use the bigger circular needles or I'm doing something for shorter periods with the smaller ones.

I just got an ad for Patternworks and they are advertising Kollage needles and saying they are good for arthritic hands. They are square and you can get a soft or firm cable. Why anyone would want firm is beyond me, but I've not tried them. They are a bit pricey...right up there with Addi's.

Jan in CA
04-10-2013, 03:54 PM
Here's links to buttons.
http://www.ravelry.com/wiki/pages/Ravelry-inspiredworks

This thread might help, too.
http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=109185&highlight=Ravelry+buttons

GrumpyGramma
04-10-2013, 04:41 PM
What size needles have you been using lately? Maybe try some really thick chunky yarn and size 13 or larger needles? If I couldn't knit comfortably with sock yarn and toothpick sized needles or even regular worsted #4 yarn and 8 or 9 needles, I'd do fatter yarn and needles. Whatever it takes.

amy
04-10-2013, 05:09 PM
I actually take turmeric now (I'm in my 30's) preventatively. It's anti-inflammatory, and inflammation contributes to the formation of arthritis. Since allergies cause inflammation, I figure my body is always going to be somewhat inflamed, so this is my way of preventing the damage of that! I also read recently that turmeric is thought to be the reason behind fewer instances of Alzheimers in heavy curry-eating regions of India.

Ad2Knit, I hope you find out more about what the cause is. If it feels like tight, seizing muscles, then that would be tension in holding the needle, as Jan says. But if it's joint pain, that's something else. And not necessarily arthritis. My joints actually ache when I eat dairy, as GG just said! (although for me it has to be a lot of dairy to feel the symptom). That, I believe, is also an inflammation response. Allergies cause inflammation. Turmeric can't hurt, I say!

ad2knit
04-10-2013, 06:54 PM
What size needles have you been using lately? Maybe try some really thick chunky yarn and size 13 or larger needles? If I couldn't knit comfortably with sock yarn and toothpick sized needles or even regular worsted #4 yarn and 8 or 9 needles, I'd do fatter yarn and needles. Whatever it takes.

hey GG. i am using 4.5mm needles with this yarn Robin Bonnie Babe (http://www.deramores.com/robin-bonny-babe-aran-100g-aran-1871)

Jan in CA
04-10-2013, 07:54 PM
That looks about right for that yarn. Had to look up a conversion chart. If your knitting is a little tight a US 8 or 9 may be good, too. Looser tends to be less painful if you're not using a death grip.

BTW I find those big needles really hard on my hands. I never use needles above a 10 or so.

jinxnit55
04-10-2013, 11:44 PM
Any living creature can get arthritis, in particular rheumatoid arthritis, because that is caused by a glitch in the immune system. That is thankfully relatively rare.

But any trauma or bad body mechanics can cause arthritis. I was a marathon runner in my 20s (loved it!) By my 30s? I had arthritis in my knees AND spine. The spine isn't too bad, but I have had 3 knee operations and have hardly any cartilage left in one. That pain (and the first operation) happened in my late 20s. The arthritis in question was caused by bad genetics; I had perfect, healthy feet for running, but I had loose joints in general, and tight lateral ligaments that pulled my kneecaps slightly out of line. A little running would have been OK, but a lot? Knee joint surfaces like hamburger!

I am almost 58 now, and I still ski, hike, ride a mountain bike and can walk miles w/o too much pain, but I eat a low-inflammation diet and keep my weight down-for every 10 pounds that you are overweight, you get 30 pounds of extra force on your knees.

Hands didn't start hurting until about age 50, but I didn't really beat them up too much One pinky got busted playing basketball and has miserable arthritis, and the bases of my thumbs are pretty touchy. But I have to say that all the pain I experienced from knitting was BEFORE I got the right knitting set-up-slidy needles and the right tension and cable lengths so I wasn't dragging the yarn across the needles. I was pretty bummed by pain and numbness for several weeks, but with new slick needles and loosening my death grip on everything, my hands are doing pretty well.

I also like turmeric, alpha lipioic acid, devil's claw, glucosamine and occasional Advil. I actually LOVE Advil Liquigels, but I bleed and bruise easily, so too much of that and I look like I've been in a bar fight! Too much advil or motrin or aleve can cause stomach bleeding and kidney damage, so..... lots of the time I just stretch, use a microwave corn bag and try to think about something else!

Wow! That's a Gone With the Wind answer, but I hope you figure it all out. Your doc should help, if she's any good.

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 03:41 AM
Thanks for that helpful post.

Got an appt this morning and if I am totally honest my docs are totes rubbish most of the time so I try to avoid going if at all possible...meh.

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 03:43 AM
That looks about right for that yarn. Had to look up a conversion chart. If your knitting is a little tight a US 8 or 9 may be good, too. Looser tends to be less painful if you're not using a death grip.


wont that make my squares look...odd and somewhat bigger compared to my squares I have just knit?

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 06:02 AM
So i went to the Docs and she told me she couldn't see anything wrong with my hands - no swellling or anything - and then she told me to rest my hands for a while and to put ibuprofen gel 3 times a day. I swear that she must have thought i was a complete idiot because thats what i felt like when i walked out. I hate the docs in my surgery they are all horrible.

To sum up I can still knit. So - perhaps you all can advise me on what to do now? Like how long should i rest my hands for? Cos i do rest them and when i don't feel any pain i knit but then that causes the problem again. And what can i do to AVOID the problem?

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 12:07 PM
No one? OK....guess everyone's bored of me lol

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 12:23 PM
I can only suggest that you work on knitting looser and try different ways of holding the yarn. It all comes down to personal experimentation and coming up with what works. I think you said you use bamboo needles, more slippery needles might help. The point is to reduce the strain on your hands in any way you can. If you've not tried the Portugese knitting, you might give it a go. My hands are feeling stiffish this morning so I think I'll wash dishes by hand before I knit today.

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 01:09 PM
I can only suggest that you work on knitting looser and try different ways of holding the yarn. It all comes down to personal experimentation and coming up with what works. I think you said you use bamboo needles, more slippery needles might help. The point is to reduce the strain on your hands in any way you can. If you've not tried the Portugese knitting, you might give it a go. My hands are feeling stiffish this morning so I think I'll wash dishes by hand before I knit today.

I wonder if I should ask my grandmother if i could borrow one of her metal knitting needles? metal's slippery is it not? If the plastic's not helping (sorry sis) and the bamboo isn't slippery enough, how about the metal?

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 01:25 PM
All those posts you made were middle of the night our time...from very late night to early morning the next day. Gotta give us time to sleep. :teehee:

Larger needles may make the squares bigger. However if you want to knit my suggestions stand..circular needles and/or a different needle material. :shrug:

Metal is slick and yarn slips over it easier, but it's cold which may not help if you have pain.

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 01:26 PM
I wonder if I should ask my grandmother if i could borrow one of her metal knitting needles? metal's slippery is it not? If the plastic's not helping (sorry sis) and the bamboo isn't slippery enough, how about the metal?


Sounds like a plan to me. What's to lose? I'm sure your sister would rather you be able to knit whatever needles you use and the bamboo ones might come in handy at times. You might be able to use them at some point. Only time and experimentation can tell. The slippery metal ones might or might not make the difference.
:shrug:

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 01:28 PM
Metal is slick and yarn slips over it easier, but it's cold which may not help if you have pain.

With circs, the metal needles are generally covered with stitches so I don't notice that they're cold. Just sayin'.

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 02:17 PM
All those posts you made were middle of the night our time...from very late night to early morning the next day. Gotta give us time to sleep. :teehee:

Larger needles may make the squares bigger. However if you want to knit my suggestions stand..circular needles and/or a different needle material. :shrug:

Metal is slick and yarn slips over it easier, but it's cold which may not help if you have pain.

I know i keep forgetting y'all are in the US and i'm in the UK lol. I'm sorry :hugs:

i'll def try the circulars - I will need them at some stage anyway i'm sure.....I think i'll need to pop into a knitting shop tomorrow and ask for advice re materials though - i'd hate to waste money - lord knows i probably have wasted some with the bamboo set and my sis buying me the plastic set..i suppose i could keep them just in case or ebay them lol.

Sounds like a plan to me. What's to lose? I'm sure your sister would rather you be able to knit whatever needles you use and the bamboo ones might come in handy at times. You might be able to use them at some point. Only time and experimentation can tell. The slippery metal ones might or might not make the difference.
:shrug:

Maybe i just won't tell my sister lol

With circs, the metal needles are generally covered with stitches so I don't notice that they're cold. Just sayin'.

And i suppose this is WHY people wear fingerless gloves when they are knitting. I'll try them though...at least i'm borrowing my nan's needles - its better than wasting more money huh?

But in the meantime - how long do you all reckon i should take a break?

PS thanks for all your posts

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 02:40 PM
A break...I dunno..do they hurt at all when you now aren't knitting or is it only when you are actually knitting? If it's only when you're knitting then I'd say you can start anytime.

You can go to a yarn store and see if they have needles you can try before you buy. However you can also by a sampler set which has 3 sets with different needle materials to test.

This is the brands KH will be selling. It also has one of the Cubix which I've heard is easier on the hands.
http://www.yarn.com/webs-knitting-needles-needle-sets/knitters-pride-new-comby-interchangable-sampler-set-with-cubics/

This is the set from Knitpicks and it also includes 3 sets of needles of different materials.
http://www.knitpicks.com/knitting-needles-crochet-hooks/try-it-needle-set.html

I don't know your financial situation, but if you're going to knit either one will be something you'll use forever. :teehee: And if you decide to go with interchangeable circs do yourself a favor and get some grippy shelf liner and cut a piece off to carry in your needle/notions bag. It helps to tighten the needles on so they don't slip. This type of stuff-
http://www.amazon.com/Grip-Shelf-Drawer-Liner-Black/dp/B000KFSOFI

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 02:49 PM
A break...I dunno..do they hurt at all when you now aren't knitting or is it only when you are actually knitting? If it's only when you're knitting then I'd say you can start anytime.
I don't know your financial situation, but if you're going to knit either one will be something you'll use forever. And if you decide to go with interchangeable circs do yourself a favor and get some grippy shelf liner and cut a piece off to carry in your needle/notions bag. It helps to tighten the needles on so they don't slip.


They're hurting slightly now, and i'm at work on the computer but the problem arises after a bit of knitting....meh....

Re my financial situation: I'm OK on that part. I just dont like to waste money.

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 03:29 PM
I should point out that many people have pain in their hands from computer work. If I'm on too much my hands are killing me.

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 03:39 PM
I should point out that many people have pain in their hands from computer work. If I'm on too much my hands are killing me.

This is very true Jan. But ive never had trouble before....

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 03:49 PM
I wonder if your problem originates higher up in your arms or even your shoulders or neck. It could be that the way you sit puts pressure on nerves. It seems you've paid attention to how you hold the needles and yarn, how you move your hands, things like that, and haven't isolated a cause. Maybe posture changes would make a difference. I think it's not a knitting problem so much as knitting adds to whatever is going on already and that's when you really notice it. Maybe a small towel rolled up to rest your wrists on? When I learned to type they stressed good posture and how you hold your arms and wrists, but that was back in about 1970 and I have no idea what is taught now. If you were going to type on a manual typewriter...not only have lots of people never used a typewriter, one that doesn't plug in is freakin' beyond belief!... you had to learn those things.

Some recollections make me feel positively prehistoric. :pout:

Antares
04-11-2013, 06:06 PM
Yeah, I have to agree with GG. Your problem might be in your neck or shoulders, or even in your back. I sometimes get a knot below my shoulder blade that affects my arm, wrist, and hand.

Perhaps a good massage is in your future!!!

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 06:38 PM
Hey look what I found!
http://knitfreedom.com/being-a-knitter/top-5-stretches-for-knitting-pain-relief

ad2knit
04-11-2013, 07:50 PM
I wonder if your problem originates higher up in your arms or even your shoulders or neck. It could be that the way you sit puts pressure on nerves. It seems you've paid attention to how you hold the needles and yarn, how you move your hands, things like that, and haven't isolated a cause. Maybe posture changes would make a difference. I think it's not a knitting problem so much as knitting adds to whatever is going on already and that's when you really notice it. Maybe a small towel rolled up to rest your wrists on? When I learned to type they stressed good posture and how you hold your arms and wrists, but that was back in about 1970 and I have no idea what is taught now. If you were going to type on a manual typewriter...not only have lots of people never used a typewriter, one that doesn't plug in is freakin' beyond belief!... you had to learn those things.

Some recollections make me feel positively prehistoric. :pout:

Posture might be an issue....I'm trying to work out where at home i can knit that's good for my back and stuff. not that i've had problems with my back although i did have problems with my upper arm but I resolved that (I think) by resting a pillow on my lap and making my wrists rest on that so that somewhat helped the arm issue.....I think the only chair place at home that might help with the posture issue might be the downstairs family room breakfast table chairs..my dressing table chair makes me feel like i want to slouch as does sitting on my bed...so I will try to force my self to take my knitting downstairs and sit down on the breakfast table chairs with a pillow rested on my lap....lets see how that goes.....

and i'm going to try to knit looser....somehow. Maybe the issue is that i'm being too tight on my knitting..need to figure out how to loosen up. god that makes me sound like I'm a tense person altogether! LOL! I'm really not, I promise!

Ok, i am going to see how it pans out....and i will to not mention the hand situation for a week. lets see how knitting downstairs at the breakfast table and trying to be looser goes...if that doesn't work, I'm def going to buy some circular needles and see if that will help any. and if that doesn't work then knitting may not be for me and i shall present my friend with a ball of yarn and say "Hey...i tried to knit you something but you know what, it didin't work out so here's some yarn, if you know of anyone that knits tell them to make something lovely from this" LOL

Thanks for tolerating these posts about my stupid fingers/hands guys. You all are a lovely bunch here. With any luck my next post will be my FO!

PS: GG i used to learn how to touch type on those typewriters! LOL! and that was in 1987! i was 7 years old and my dad's secretary bless her, taught me how to touch type - thats what my dad did sometimes after I finished school - bring me to work and ask his secretary to keep me occupied for a few hours! And what fun it was too :)

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 09:22 PM
When I knit tightmy hands do hurt more. My purling is pretty tight which is usually when I notice it. My knitting is loose. Also e careful the working yarn slides through your fingers. Relax. :)

I learned to type in 1968 or so. I thought they were electric, but I could be wrong.

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 09:24 PM
When I knit tightmy hands do hurt more. My purling is pretty tight which is usually when I notice it. My knitting is loose. Also e careful the working yarn slides through your fingers. Relax. :)

I learned to type in 1968 or so. I thought they were electric, but I could be wrong.

For some reason we had to learn on the manuals and then moved to Selectrics.

Antares
04-11-2013, 09:27 PM
If you're knitting somewhere where you don't have good back support, then that could be causing problems, too.

Do you have a recliner or a couch you can relax and knit on. I almost always knit in my recliner. Of course, that doesn't automatically mean I'm relaxed (I still have to tell my shoulders, "DOWN!"), but I'm much more relaxed there than, say, sitting on my bed with no (or poor) back support.

Hope something will work for you!

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 09:29 PM
If you're knitting somewhere where you don't have good back support, then that could be causing problems, too.

Do you have a recliner or a couch you can relax and knit on. I almost always knit in my recliner. Of course, that doesn't automatically mean I'm relaxed (I still have to tell my shoulders, "DOWN!"), but I'm much more relaxed there than, say, sitting on my bed with no (or poor) back support.

Hope something will work for you!

I usually sit in an arm chair, feet on a foot stool, elbows maybe resting on the chair arms. Poor posture I guess but it works. I guess it's mostly because I can't really roll my shoulders forward sitting like this.

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 09:32 PM
For some reason we had to learn on the manuals and then moved to Selectrics.

I was thinking Selectric so it might have been that. I guess it's kind if like teaching a kid to add, subtract, multiply and divide before they can use a calculator? Math makes sense for this, but not typing.

GrumpyGramma
04-11-2013, 09:36 PM
I was thinking Selectric so it might have been that. I guess it's kind if like teaching a kid to add, subtract, multiply and divide before they can use a calculator? Math makes sense for this, but not typing.

Or maybe because we lived in a backward town where lots of manual typewriters were still in use. I dunno, never made sense back then and doesn't now. I do know I never could type worth a darn, and I still can't. Yea! computers! I can correct my mistakes and never have to worry about the CCs! Oh yeah, upside down carbon paper...those were the good ol' days, no doubt about it. :roflhard:

Jan in CA
04-11-2013, 09:57 PM
Carbon paper! Ugh!

I lived in southern CA in fairly nice area so maybe that is the difference. I was the 5th class to graduate so it was pretty new, too. :shrug:

jinxnit55
04-11-2013, 11:09 PM
Thanks for the knitting stretches, they look GREAT! Stretching any part of the body is almost always a good thing.

I "learned" to type on IBM Selectrics! "learned" because I still use my 2 third fingers to hunt and peck, and am surprisingly fast. I took typing in summer school when I was a junior in high school, and got a "courtesy D." Tried again in junior college. They timed us, and for some reason that really rattled me! After 90 seconds I would be bouncing up and down in my chair, my hands would no longer be on the home row, and the page was full of gibberish. I dropped the class, with the instructor saying, "You'll NEVER be a secretary!" So I went to medical school instead. And guess what! I still have to type because we put the notes on computers! Sigh...... I tried the dictation thing called 'Dragon,' but I would say, "patient had pap smear today," and it would come out like "patient had Pabst beer today." So I hunt and peck away. My brain just goes faster than my hands, I guess.

jinxnit55
04-11-2013, 11:13 PM
That's right, you Brits have National Health Service! Do you have to go to a certain doctor? Could you go to a specialist if you needed to? Here in the states we call them Physical Medicine and Rehab (PMR) docs.

ad2knit
04-12-2013, 12:36 AM
If you're knitting somewhere where you don't have good back support, then that could be causing problems, too.

Do you have a recliner or a couch you can relax and knit on. I almost always knit in my recliner. Of course, that doesn't automatically mean I'm relaxed (I still have to tell my shoulders, "DOWN!"), but I'm much more relaxed there than, say, sitting on my bed with no (or poor) back support.

Hope something will work for you!

See if I knit on the couch i slouch. now thats not good for posture surely? :/

just found this....advice I should follow lol http://knitty.com/ISSUEspring05/FEATloosenup.html

ad2knit
04-12-2013, 12:37 AM
That's right, you Brits have National Health Service! Do you have to go to a certain doctor? Could you go to a specialist if you needed to? Here in the states we call them Physical Medicine and Rehab (PMR) docs.

Docs refer us to the specialist...unless we go private

Jan in CA
04-12-2013, 12:45 AM
That's funny, Jinx! Are you a physician now? My daughters fiancÚ just got into school to be a PA.

Paulaque
04-12-2013, 01:16 AM
my first typewriter was a Buddy L model (it was a toy that was actually a typewriter, it was fully functional) that my ma bought me at a yardsale when I was 5 years old. By the time I took typing in high school, I typed 124 wpm, and my typing teacher could only type 85 wpm. She was asking me for tips! Now, because of the RA and arthritis, I can peck out a pitiful 60 wpm on a "good" day. But, I refuse to stop trying. I play mavis beacon every day for at least an hour, it is my addiction...

I knit sitting indian style in my recliner, with my elbows resting on my knees, slouched over, I know it is not good posture, but I have scoliosis, so my posture is never going to be right

ad2knit
04-12-2013, 01:03 PM
my first typewriter was a Buddy L model (it was a toy that was actually a typewriter, it was fully functional) that my ma bought me at a yardsale when I was 5 years old. By the time I took typing in high school, I typed 124 wpm, and my typing teacher could only type 85 wpm. She was asking me for tips! Now, because of the RA and arthritis, I can peck out a pitiful 60 wpm on a "good" day. But, I refuse to stop trying. I play mavis beacon every day for at least an hour, it is my addiction...

I knit sitting indian style in my recliner, with my elbows resting on my knees, slouched over, I know it is not good posture, but I have scoliosis, so my posture is never going to be right

I had a friend at school with scoliosis. Just wanted to say that, not sure why lol!

Update trying to knit looser and i think its helping - not much pain in these fingers this morning - but I'm not holding my breath..instead i shall just hope I fixed the problem lol

Paula...what is indian style knitting? Show me a vid?

GrumpyGramma
04-12-2013, 01:11 PM
Not holding your breath is good! It's surprising to me every time I realize I was holding my breath while working on something. It really doesn't help. I knew 2 girls, sisters, with scoliosis that wore funny braces with a chin rest type of thing. I hope the braces helped. I think Paulaque was referring to how she sits, not a style of knitting. Think snake charmer or yoga style positions. I can't pretzel myself like that.

Jan in CA
04-12-2013, 01:21 PM
When we older folks were kids, before political correctness took over, we had to sit "Indian style" if we were on the floor. It's just sitting with your legs folded and crossed. It's not a knitting style. My teacher daughter says they now have to call it "criss cross applesauce". :teehee:

Keep practicing the loose knitting. No tugging, no death grips, just relax. If it looks a bit messy it's okay. Your tension will come as you get used to it. Don't forget to still take little breaks.

Also get some wood circs with a flexible cable ay some point to try them.

ad2knit
04-12-2013, 01:43 PM
Not holding your breath is good! It's surprising to me every time I realize I was holding my breath while working on something. It really doesn't help. I knew 2 girls, sisters, with scoliosis that wore funny braces with a chin rest type of thing. I hope the braces helped. I think Paulaque was referring to how she sits, not a style of knitting. Think snake charmer or yoga style positions. I can't pretzel myself like that.

No when I said not holding my breath i didn't mean i was actually holding my breath...oh...i just meant..oh never mind lol

When we older folks were kids, before political correctness took over, we had to sit "Indian style" if we were on the floor. It's just sitting with your legs folded and crossed. It's not a knitting style. My teacher daughter says they now have to call it "criss cross applesauce". :teehee:

Keep practicing the loose knitting. No tugging, no death grips, just relax. If it looks a bit messy it's okay. Your tension will come as you get used to it. Don't forget to still take little breaks.

Also get some wood circs with a flexible cable ay some point to try them.

it already looks slightly messy. I hope it doesn't ruin the blanket in some way...I am hoping when i finish i can use the ends to weave through the messyness and hope it disguises it. It already looks like i dropped a stitch even though I haven't cos i have all the stitches on my needle!

Jan in CA
04-12-2013, 01:50 PM
Eventually not strangling or tugging the yarn becomes second nature.

How many squares do have and still need to make?

ad2knit
04-12-2013, 01:59 PM
Eventually not strangling or tugging the yarn becomes second nature.

How many squares do have and still need to make? er...lets see...done 8 of white.....2 of yellow...so there's 7 more of the yellow to go, one more of the white (i got bored of the white so i thought I'd do a new colour and knit the last white last or whenever lol) and I have 9 squares of green and 9 of lilac to knit after the yellow. LOL that's a lot of squares lol!

jinxnit55
04-13-2013, 01:54 AM
That's funny, Jinx! Are you a physician now? My daughters fiancÚ just got into school to be a PA.
Yes, I am a physician at the Reno VAMC, taking care of veterans. We have PAs and NPs, here, too. Plus nurses, of course. You can't go wrong going into healthcare. Congrats to your daughter's fiancee!

ad2knit
04-15-2013, 12:54 PM
Update - knitting looser does help..or at least it did until yesterday when they became achy painy. I think its because of the cable project bag....learning a new stitch n all that..so im going to rest it for a few days again