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Artchic528
04-22-2013, 11:26 PM
Hazel Tindall, knitting away. It blows my mind how fast she is.

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HeathersHobbies
04-23-2013, 01:39 AM
That is amazing. She is an English knitter too and people say that continental knitting is faster :roflhard:

Jan in CA
04-23-2013, 01:52 AM
That is amazing. She is an English knitter too and people say that continental knitting is faster :roflhard:

Exactly. There is no one best way, it's what works best for you. ;)

HeathersHobbies
04-23-2013, 02:04 AM
I am an English knitter but I am slow. I have tried continental and I just can't seem to get the hang of it.

RochesterKnitter
04-23-2013, 08:56 AM
Watch closely around the 55-60sec mark.

Her right hand stays put, with her finger just flicking the yarn around the needle. This is much closer to continental-style knitting than your usual English-style knitting (dropping and picking up the yarn each stitch). It's also like the underside of a sewing machine.
Her left hand moves up and down, allowing her right needle to move in/out of the working stitch while staying put (so she can flick the yarn). In essence, her left hand is like a sewing machine needle going up/down.

It's very mechanical and very efficient.

Antares
04-23-2013, 11:40 AM
I can "watch closely," but I'm not so sure I can watch quickly enough to see what she's doing. :teehee:

GrumpyGramma
04-23-2013, 12:05 PM
Watch her in slo-mo, sort of. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mA0nTh3dqGw

Becky Morgan
04-23-2013, 12:17 PM
Also, there's no wrist-twist-and-yank to it, so I doubt she's straining her hands much and the load is fairly even on both sides. It looks like a thoroughly sane way to knit.

ad2knit
04-23-2013, 01:35 PM
Watch closely.

Her right hand stays put, with her finger just flicking the yarn around the needle. This is much closer to continental-style knitting than your usual English-style knitting (dropping and picking up the yarn each stitch). It's also like the underside of a sewing machine.
Her left hand moves up and down, allowing her right needle to move in/out of the working stitch while staying put (so she can flick the yarn). In essence, her left hand is like a sewing machine needle going up/down.

It's very mechanical and very efficient.

Oh im going to have to see how she does it then cos Id like my hand to stay put. lpl. Will have to have a looksie when I get in. cant view it on the mobile

ad2knit
04-23-2013, 01:39 PM
I am an English knitter but I am slow. I have tried continental and I just can't seem to get the hang of it.

Dont worry Heather nor can I.its all too fiddly for me

GrumpyGramma
04-23-2013, 01:55 PM
Exactly. There is no one best way, it's what works best for you. ;)


I am determined to learn to knit and purl English style. I don't accept that I can't do it. I'm looking into how these speed knitters hold the yarn, maybe I'll learn something from them. Speed isn't my goal; being able to knit English is. You see, the right way right now is for me to be able to do yarn in each hand and be comfortable and confident with it. So far I can knit but I don't like the way the yarn feels as I hold it and I keep dropping it and having to pick it up again. Surely that doesn't happen for the speed knitters.

Jan in CA
04-23-2013, 04:00 PM
I can knit fairly fast, but nowhere near what that woman does. :teehee:

I wrap the yarn in my fingers and kind of flick it over the needle. I don't drop it. I put it between ring and pinky then around pinky and across middle two fingers on palm side then under under index finger and over. My right hand lifts slightly to go around needle for either one, but I don't let go really.

GrumpyGramma
04-23-2013, 04:14 PM
Similar to this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zTCQNhV9nA), Jan? Except he takes the yarn around pinky and ring fingers. So far this is the most nearly successful for me. I was trying it out earlier. I was actually able to purl and keep the yarn in my hand. My right hand just has to learn how to do it. I think I can, I think I can, I think I can. :)

Jan in CA
04-23-2013, 06:54 PM
Pretty much like this video from KH called matering tension. Except of course it's in your right hand. :) What it ends up being is what works for you. I should have that in my signature I say it so much..:teehee:
http://www.knittinghelp.com/video/play/mastering-tension-and-gauge

Paulaque
04-23-2013, 08:04 PM
me neither, continental is lost on me, and I knit english, but never drop the yarn? I have it wrapped around my right index finger...

justplaincharlotte
04-23-2013, 10:27 PM
I think I can, I think I can, I think I can. :)

But of course you can! Go get 'em, tiger! :thumbsup:

GrumpyGramma
04-23-2013, 11:09 PM
Jan, I've watched the video and tried it, and I've tried this and that, and I'll keep on trying and one of these days (years?) it will work and it won't feel so awkward and sloppy loose...I'm right handed for cryin' out loud, it should...not...be...so...hard! :chair:


:??

Jan in CA
04-23-2013, 11:23 PM
:teehee: I know. I hate when we feel like all thumbs. I'm right handed mostly, but can, and do, a lot with my left. Continental was like I was using toes at first. :zombie: Eventually it clicked though.

N0obKnitter
04-24-2013, 10:14 AM
I'd rather be accurate than uber fast.


I guess my speed is OK (German/Continental) but I don't fret about that much.

Lizars1735
04-24-2013, 12:00 PM
I switched to continental thinking it would be faster, and it probably is on the knit stitch, but I'm still a slow knitter and will just have to stay that way.

GG, I learned how to knit English style and never really could get the purl stitch down very well. I always had to drop the right needle to wrap the yarn, and didn't for the knit stitch. It's probably how I held the yarn in my right hand. Since this thread started I've looked around for some videos of fast purling and most of them purl English style. My fingers just won't do what they can do. I'm comfortable with continental now so I don't try anymore, but I do wish you luck in your learning. Despite being right handed, it's just not that easy for everyone.

KnitandPurl
04-24-2013, 03:24 PM
I knew a woman who could work that fast in crochet. She was so smooth.

I learned knitting from my Japanese roommate a long time ago but I think she taught me English and it didn't stick. So I re-taught myself after doing right-handed crochet for awhile and learned continental - you feed yarn from the left hand for both crochet and continental. When trying English, my right hand was particularly uncooperative about tensioning yarn.

I've since picked up English to do stranded knitting along with continental and so far its the only way I can do it. My English stitches are tighter than my continental.

justplaincharlotte
04-24-2013, 08:51 PM
For fast purling, I can only recommend looking into Portuguese style knitting. It's actually easier than the knit stitch. Check out Andrea Wong's demo of both stitches on you tube here.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gzfYS9_t27k

GrumpyGramma
04-24-2013, 10:32 PM
I found, watched, tried that last night. Pretty cool. I'll try it again soon, I ran into a couple hangups and need to give it space. How is color work done in the Portugese style?

justplaincharlotte
04-25-2013, 07:17 PM
I found, watched, tried that last night. Pretty cool. I'll try it again soon, I ran into a couple hangups and need to give it space. How is color work done in the Portugese style?

It took me a little getting used to, and a few needles tossed across the living room in a fit of pique ;) , but I quickly came to love it. Compared to when I knit English, I'm Speedy Gonzales now! :happydance:

Color work is pretty much the same as what she did in the video, and much like how color work is done in the other methods. Just use another pin to tension the 2nd color on the right side of your chest, and keep the yarn untangled. The untangled yarn bit is still a "yeah, right" for me. :roflhard: I bought her Portuguese knitting II DVD so I could see color work in action.

GrumpyGramma
04-25-2013, 07:35 PM
Did you get the knitting pin? Or do you use something else? I could see buying one if I decide I will be knitting like that, for practice I'd like to use something else. Last night I had the yarn 'round my neck and that's not something I can do comfortably.

Jan in CA
04-25-2013, 08:28 PM
I have some coil less safety pins that would work. I got them at Joann in the beading section. Most craft stores probably have them. I use them for markers right on the knitting if I need that to mark a row or something.

Newfherder
04-26-2013, 01:33 AM
According to her web site, Hazel uses a knitting belt which anchors the bottom of the right needle, and that helps minimize hand movement, and that in turn helps her speed. That, and fifty years of practice ;)

I couldn't get the hang of English OR Continental knitting, but Portuguese came pretty naturally to me. Most of the yarn work is done by flicking the left thumb. I used a saftey pin and a paperclip to improvise my knitting pin.

justplaincharlotte
04-27-2013, 11:54 PM
I tried it round the neck and after I figured out I liked it, I bought the knitting pins. But Jan hit the nail on the head coilless safety pins are a good substitute, and make fantastic stitch markers.

Otherwise if you have a brooch with a hook shaped curl in it, that would work too. I got one of Andrea's pretty silver decorative knitting pins because I forget to take my pin off and am tired of people asking if I'm going fishing. ;)

GrumpyGramma
04-28-2013, 12:00 AM
I tried it round the neck and after I figured out I liked it, I bought the knitting pins. But Jan hit the nail on the head coilless safety pins are a good substitute, and make fantastic stitch markers.

Otherwise if you have a brooch with a hook shaped curl in it, that would work too. I got one of Andrea's pretty silver decorative knitting pins because I forget to take my pin off and am tired of people asking if I'm going fishing. ;)


:roflhard: I've been using a crochet hook with an ergonomic fat handle on it lately but I used to stick the hook in a handy compartment under the front of my shirt. More than once I got back from shopping and realized I'd taken it with me. I don't think my shirt always hid it and I've wondered what anyone who might have noticed it thought. :shrug:

Good ideas. I'm not much for jewelry but will figure out something to try. If I like it I bet I'll get something nice to use.

justplaincharlotte
04-28-2013, 12:46 AM
I've been using a crochet hook with an ergonomic fat handle on it lately but I used to stick the hook in a handy compartment under the front of my shirt. More than once I got back from shopping and realized I'd taken it with me. I don't think my shirt always hid it and I've wondered what anyone who might have noticed it thought. :shrug:

Good ideas. I'm not much for jewelry but will figure out something to try. If I like it I bet I'll get something nice to use.

LOLOL about your crochet hook! I'm bad about using a DPN as a cable needle, and sticking it over my ear like a pencil when not in use. The cashiers at my grocery loved that one!

As for the rest check your private messages. USPS is at worst 4 business days wait. :muah:

Jan in CA
04-28-2013, 01:28 AM
:roflhard: I've been using a crochet hook with an ergonomic fat handle on it lately but I used to stick the hook in a handy compartment under the front of my shirt. More than once I got back from shopping and realized I'd taken it with me. I don't think my shirt always hid it and I've wondered what anyone who might have noticed it thought. :shrug:

Good ideas. I'm not much for jewelry but will figure out something to try. If I like it I bet I'll get something nice to use.

:roflhard: Never thought of that!

GrumpyGramma
04-28-2013, 01:36 AM
I wondered what would have been the reaction had I ever had to go through a metal detector and couldn't figure out what set it off. Funniest home videos? :roflhard: Surprisingly I was in an office where you had to go through a detector and they went through my purse because, as I told them, I don't know what would qualify as a possible weapon...keys maybe? My pocket knife had to go back to the car, understandably, but they let my very sharp sock circs go in. I'd forgotten I had them with me and when I saw them I wondered about it but was glad that I got to knit while I waited at least. Later I wondered if pulling them out was tempting fate. I sometimes carry scissors too. Yikes!

ArtLady1981
05-01-2013, 12:35 PM
I watched a World's Fastest Knitter video a few years ago. I think it was sponsored on the Knit Picks website, but never mind that.

After watching this incredible woman, I tried an experiment:
1) I started a garter stitch swatch.
2) I set a timer.
3) Using my normal knitting speed, I knit X rows (cant' remember)
$) Then, I knit the same number of rows going as fast as I could. Really really fast. Oh, blazing!

The outcome of the experiment: I knit slower when I was trying to knit fast.

Sigh.

I tried that darn experiment over and over.
I could not increase my speed when I was trying to increase my speed.

The final analysis: The timer put me under such stress, I couldn't perform as well. :wall:

Sigh.

Back to knitting my usual way. Not fast, not slow. Accurately and with pleasure.