PDA

View Full Version : Handy conversion guide


DavidSydney63
07-04-2013, 01:54 AM
I find this helpful, especially as North Americans have such weird needle sizes

http://www.needlenook.com.au/conversions.htm

GrumpyGramma
07-04-2013, 02:35 AM
Oh, what a handy chart. It will be good for seeing what your weird needle sizes mean! LOL

I don't know why there isn't an international standard for knitting needle sizes. It would be much less confusing. Thanks for the link.

Jan in CA
07-04-2013, 02:37 AM
We have weird sizes? :teehee:

I have a ruler/needle sizer that has that on it which is nice, too.

salmonmac
07-04-2013, 05:50 AM
Always good to have handy. Thanks for the link.

DavidSydney63
07-04-2013, 10:08 AM
I firmly believe the Australian needle size method is the best because it's based on a measurement (circumference), not some random number (like the US and British systems).

The fact that our sizes are in metric, is of course problematic to Poms and Yanks, I know ... I know ... I know.

Jan in CA
07-04-2013, 11:22 AM
I agree the US should have gone metric years ago. It would be a big transition, but could be done over a period of time. Probably not for awhile though. If the numbers are in the range of 10 centimeters I can figure it out...otherwise not so much. :lol:

Dclutterchique
07-04-2013, 02:44 PM
I firmly believe the Australian needle size method is the best because it's based on a measurement (circumference), not some random number (like the US and British systems).

The fact that our sizes are in metric, is of course problematic to Poms and Yanks, I know ... I know ... I know.

David, we switched over to metric sizing for knittting needles in the last century.

The only reason conversion charts and needle sizing gauges have the old UK sizes is so that if anyone is using either a pre-metric pattern or pre-metric needles they can make the correct conversion. With more and more patterns being uploaded to the internet, this is not as rare as one might think. Oh by the way, and correct me if I'm wrong, I though that pre-metric Australia used the same system as the UK (and the rest of the Commonwealth). Also the millimetres refer to the diameter of the needle.

DogCatMom
07-04-2013, 07:12 PM
I'm pretty comfortable using metric measurements and am getting more comfortable the longer I stay in the knitting and crochet worlds. U.S. crochet hook size H/#8 = U.S. knitting needle size #8 = 5.0 mm diameter.

The real killer used to be (and, for some brands, still is :evil: ) when crochet hooks showed only the LETTER and not a number on them. What does one do with a crochet hook "size F"? There's just no way to tie it in with any reasonable sizing system. Only when my hands permitted me to return to yarnwork in 2008 did I find that hooks and needles both were now labelled with numbers and, sometimes, mm diameter as well. Hallelujah! :cheering:

But what happens in the UK system when very fine needles are...ah...needed? At least one local knitting instructor has said, while demonstrating stitches in a Fair Isle class and responding to a question about lace knitting, that she's used "6-ought" size needles. This is 000000 in American terminology, 0.75 mm in metric. But the list I initially referred to on my return (http://www.fiber2yarn.com/info/needlehookchart.htm) doesn't provide UK equivalents. Do British knitters simply order from the other side of the Channel or use Continental brands?

The chart I'd like to know about is the one that translates "4-ply" and "8-ply" to terms like laceweight, fingering, sportweight, DK, worsted weight, Aran, bulky, chunky, and so on. Anybody?

Good discussion; thanks, DavidSydney63!

salmonmac
07-04-2013, 07:56 PM
There's a chart here that may helpwith ply:
http://www.ravelry.com/help/yarn/weights

DavidSydney63
07-04-2013, 09:47 PM
yeah - this has turned into a fascinating thread (no pun intended), thanks to Salmon for the link to ply table - this is VERY timely and VERY useful!!

Love your work.

David xoxo

Jan in CA
07-04-2013, 09:48 PM
Ply isn't really a good description. It can apply to other weights of yarn as well so it's usually best to use gauge if you don't know the weight.
http://www.purlbee.com/2-ply-4-ply-why-ply/

ETA the site isn't coming up for some reason. I'll fix it if I find it.

Well here's another short description since the link is broken.
http://www.depictthis.net/2012/06/link-love-2-ply-4-ply-why-ply.html

GrumpyGramma
07-04-2013, 10:41 PM
Thanks, Jan. I wanted to say I go by the gauge but then thought maybe that wasn't pertinent.

salmonmac
07-05-2013, 05:48 AM
Yes, I think that's why there's a movement away from using ply (at least in the US). Gauge and the recommended needles give you a better feeling for the kind of yarn that can be used.
This article from Knitty is very interesting about the use of ply in general and how it affects your knitting.
http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall05/FEATwhyply.html

DavidSydney63
07-05-2013, 10:28 AM
i agree, though then move way from ply here isnt so obvious. I certainly read the labels of yarn now, giving sts per inch etc.

dturner
07-07-2013, 01:26 PM
I agree the US should have gone metric years ago. It would be a big transition, but could be done over a period of time. Probably not for awhile though. If the numbers are in the range of 10 centimeters I can figure it out...otherwise not so much. :lol:

I agree. I'm showing my age, but I remember when the speed limit signs here in the US were changed to include both mph and kph. Like Jan, I have a hard time "thinking" in metric. Maybe if the kids were taught both systems in grade school, we could slowly make the transition. (Maybe they ARE taught both systems now?:shrug: ) Anyway, it would be great to use metric for knitting. That system can be used internationally, and, as David points out, it just makes more sense.

DavidSydney63
07-07-2013, 08:43 PM
Actually it wouldn't matter if it were in inches or centimetres, so long as it were a measure - I think 8ths of an inch are a little tricky for me to comprehend.

I learned inches/miles/stones (not pounds) in grade school. But we transitioned to metric in the late 1960s so I went with the flow.

I now find it very difficult to comprehend how long a mile is, yet a kilometre is a piece of cake, odd.

GrumpyGramma
07-07-2013, 09:33 PM
Actually it wouldn't matter if it were in inches or centimetres, so long as it were a measure - I think 8ths of an inch are a little tricky for me to comprehend.

I learned inches/miles/stones (not pounds) in grade school. But we transitioned to metric in the late 1960s so I went with the flow.

I now find it very difficult to comprehend how long a mile is, yet a kilometre is a piece of cake, odd.

It all depends on what we're used to. I have little concept of what metric measurements are simply because I don't use them. Important question for you: What's a stone? I've encountered it in books (such as James Herriot's All Creatures books) but don't know what it means.

DogCatMom
07-08-2013, 01:52 PM
Answering questions in the most recent two posts:

1 mile = 1.6 km

1 stone = 14 lb (approx. 6.25 kg)

DavidSydney63
07-16-2013, 09:32 AM
and

1 inch = 2.5 centimetres