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View Full Version : In desparate need of a little trouble shooting...


ChroniclesofYarnia
12-08-2004, 05:23 PM
First...HOWDY! :) I'm Chris, and previously posted as Scared2Knit. :oops: This site has been pivotal in me learning to knit, and I am no longer scared. (Well, except of DPN's)

ANYHOW, I am having some beginner questions. My tension is ok, but are there any good tips for making it more consistent? It's just a LITTLE bigger on one side than the other, if that makes sense.

The other, does your speed depend on the needles you use? I notice that Amy uses metal needles, and that she is the speed queen. I am using bamboo, which I really like the feel of in my hands, but is that a hindrance?

Also...last one, I promise...I am not having to touch the tip of the needle when taking the stitch off in either knitting or purling. I just scoop it and pull it through. alot of the times I don't even touch the needles together (in knitting I do it more than in purling. after the first row in purling they don't touch except for the first stitch of a row.)

Ok, that should keep you busy for a little while. :lol I'm gonna go and get back to work on my "Zeeby's Bag" that is going to take til next Christmas to finish.

Marnie
12-09-2004, 02:02 AM
...

ANYHOW, I am having some beginner questions. My tension is ok, but are there any good tips for making it more consistent? It's just a LITTLE bigger on one side than the other, if that makes sense.

Honestly, it's mostly time and practice. I know that's horribly unhelpful but the truth is that it just comes with time. If you find your stitches or your rows are uneven, you should try giving the piece a quick wash and block. It may resolve the issue for you.

The other, does your speed depend on the needles you use? I notice that Amy uses metal needles, and that she is the speed queen. I am using bamboo, which I really like the feel of in my hands, but is that a hindrance?

Needles can definitely impact your speed. Some needles that give you additional speed with one yarn may actually hold you up with other yarns. In other cases, some yarns are so slippery that having a little friction (like with wooden needles) can actually help you out because you don't drop stitches so often. My personal favorites are my Denise interchangables which are great with natural fibers but a little less great with microfibers and some really fuzzy yarns. And my other favs are my Addi Turbos which are very expensive but very worth the price. They are metal but are smoother than most other metal needles out there.

Also...last one, I promise...I am not having to touch the tip of the needle when taking the stitch off in either knitting or purling. I just scoop it and pull it through. alot of the times I don't even touch the needles together (in knitting I do it more than in purling. after the first row in purling they don't touch except for the first stitch of a row.)

That doesn't sound like anything to worry about. Are you concerned that you are doing something wrong? When I knit continentally, I don't touch my needle tips either.

ChroniclesofYarnia
12-09-2004, 09:47 AM
Thanks so much. :) Glad to hear that it just takes practice, cause I will have plenty of it by the time I am done with this bag. (and I can hide the mistakes when I sew it up) I was looking at my work last night, and I realized that on the left edge the edging is really loose and looks like poo, but the right edge is nice and tight. :lol: I am gonna have to see whether it is the first knit or the first purl that I am buggering up.

I just need to get out into the needle world. w

I was just looking for validation that I am not doing it wrong. I've kind of just settled into doing it differently than the videos, but it seems to workfor me.

Thanks again. :)

Marnie
12-09-2004, 10:56 AM
Oh the topic of selvege stitches is perenial favorite among knitters. The stitches at the edges of knitting will tend to be looser and poopier than the inner stitches, though it sounds like when you start your purl rows you aren't snugging the yarn up enough.
There are two things you can do that will make all selvage stitches look better.
1. Always knit the first stitch of every row regardless of the pattern
or
2. Always slip the first stitch of every row

Either one should clean up your selvages and make them more even.

Good luck :)

ChroniclesofYarnia
12-09-2004, 11:12 AM
I have no idea what you mean by "slip" the first stitch, but with your other suggestion do you mean that even if you are doing stockinette, go ahead and just knit the first stitch in the purl row? (and I did find that my knit rows were the nice edges. I really yank that yarn as hard as possible. lol)

Marnie
12-09-2004, 11:54 AM
Slipping a stitch means you just move it from the left needle to the right needle without knitting or purling it. You just slip it. :)

As for my second suggestion, yes, if you are working Stockinette, you will knit the first stitch even on purl rows. Basically, your edge stitches will be worked in garter stitch while everything else will be worked in stockinette.

Nuno930
12-11-2004, 05:58 PM
As for my second suggestion, yes, if you are working Stockinette, you will knit the first stitch even on purl rows. Basically, your edge stitches will be worked in garter stitch while everything else will be worked in stockinette.

Would this work for ribbing as well? I am having issues purlling the begining of rows :oops:

Marnie
12-11-2004, 11:01 PM
In any stitch pattern you can slip the first stitch in the manner of that the stitch should be worked.
That means you go to work the stitch as usual. If you purl, the yarn is forward and you enter the stitch from right to left. But, instead of purling the stitch, you just move it from one needle to the next.