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View Full Version : Does brand name matter with needles?


Nuno930
01-28-2005, 02:25 PM
I found a set of bamboo needles (sized 4-12) at Crafters Choice for $35. That seemed like a good price, but I am wondering if that is TOO good of a price?

Does the brand of needles matter a lot that anyone has noticed?

Marnie
01-28-2005, 04:14 PM
Nuno930,
Some people are very picky about their needles, others are not. With wooden needles you run a couple risks:
1. The wood can splinter making knitting almost impossible
2. The joins to the cables can be inferior, also leading to useless needles.

If you are looking for a good set of interchangables, the two most popular are the Boyle and the Denise (metal and plastic respectively).

I would probably recommend that you stick with either of these brands.

I hope that helps,
~m

beldaraan
01-28-2005, 04:20 PM
I haven't worked with anything beyond metal right now, but here's a word of advice from the lady at my new fav LYS. I was out shopping for dpn's and I was going to get wood, because I heard the yarn doesn't slip off of them as easily as metal. She recommended that I stick with the metal, at least for now since I'm so new to knitting, because I would have a greater chance of breaking the wooden ones (they were a small size). I bought the metal ones.

kdavies
01-28-2005, 05:03 PM
It really does depend on how picky you are. I, of course, am extremely picky. I purchased a set of bamboo knitting needles inexpensively online and also purchased a Lantern Moon needle at the same time. The difference was incredible.

I really don't like the bamboo set. The yarn doesn't want to slide on them at all. This was a single point set and I've been slowly replacing them.

I do like Clover, Suzanne and Lantern Moon quite a bit, for wooden needles. I don't like aluminum and haven't tried plastic, but a good set of bamboo will probably be my staple. I do love Lantern Moon, but they are awfully long and pricey. (Now, if they come out with circulars, I'm in trouble!)

ekgheiy
01-28-2005, 05:20 PM
I found a set of bamboo needles (sized 4-12) at Crafters Choice for $35. That seemed like a good price, but I am wondering if that is TOO good of a price?

Does the brand of needles matter a lot that anyone has noticed?

WOW!!! $35 for needles :shock:

I understand that wooden needles are more expensive than metal or plastic, but the most expensive that I've seen was $20 ... at one of the LYS around here. They are severe snobs by the way :evil: :cry:

I never cease to be stick-shocked ... :lol:

Nuno930
01-28-2005, 05:24 PM
EK -

That is for the whole set. Sizes 4-12 plus (a rather tacky) carrying case.


I do prefer bamboo vs. plastic or metal.... Hmmm, i guess i can get them and send them back if I don't like them.

ekgheiy
01-28-2005, 05:41 PM
EK -

That is for the whole set. Sizes 4-12 plus (a rather tacky) carrying case.

Ooooohhh :oops:
I thought that was just for one pair of needles. So I'm really shocked with the LYS because they wanted $20 for one pair of wooden needles.

kdavies
01-28-2005, 05:50 PM
Price really depends on the needles. I've found that the higher priced needles have good warranties and I've liked the needles better. Lantern Moon go for around $20, if you're lucky.

Nuno930
01-28-2005, 05:51 PM
EK -

That is for the whole set. Sizes 4-12 plus (a rather tacky) carrying case.

Ooooohhh :oops:
I thought that was just for one pair of needles. So I'm really shocked with the LYS because they wanted $20 for one pair of wooden needles.

Yeah, see that is why I am thinking it is TOO good of a deal. :?

foldedbird
01-28-2005, 08:39 PM
If you are looking for a good set of interchangables, the two most popular are the Boyle and the Denise (metal and plastic respectively).

What a nice name for knitting needles :)

Foldedbird/Denise hehe

amy
02-02-2005, 01:15 PM
Actually, it's "Boye," not "Boyle!" (Boils, eeeew! LOL. )

It really depends on what you're looking for. If you like metal needles, like me, you'll love the Boyes. I love my Boye Needlemaster interchangeable set!

The one complaint that is often made about the Boye set, is that the needles come un-screwed. This is because the "grip' they include with the set, which is supposed to help you hold the needle when tightening it onto the cable, is horrible and doesn't grip the needle at all! The trick is to replace it with a good grip! I use a 4" circle cut out of a pair of yellow dish-washing gloves. Works like a charm! It REALLY grips. You'll never, ever have a problem with them unscrewing if you use this as a grip.

It's a great set, in my opinion. It comes with 13 needle sizes (!), and multiple cable lengths, and it all fits in a great, compact case. It's a great investment! And, I forget who said it now, but someone said they had a problem with one of their cables, and Boye replaced it no problem. So they're a good company, apparently. I recommend them!

:)
Amy

Nuno930
02-02-2005, 01:52 PM
Hmmm, now I am looking at getting a set of interchangables. I can knit most things "flat" on circs, right? I am really getting tired of having to buy a new set of needles for every project I attempt :roll: Then I am going to have to RE-buy all the size needles in circs???? :evil:


http://store.nobleknits.com/basisetbypl.html

Yvonne
02-02-2005, 02:44 PM
Amy, that was me who had to get a new cable because one broke. I was very happy with the service.
I love my Needle Master too! So many sizes! So smooth! Such pretty colors!
I think the grip thingie is okay as long as you remember to use that little tightening tool along with it.
I had great fun the other night doing a gauge swatch for really thin yarn (2000 ypp) I wanted to use for lace, starting off with the size 2 and working right up to about size 7. It was so easy to just continue the same swatch, changing to a larger needle every few inches. It couldn't be more convenient.

Jouf
02-02-2005, 03:17 PM
Nuno, I just bought Boyes and Denise!!! Anyway, they have a button you can put on the end of the cable if you so desire and it's basically like knitting with single points except you don't have the long sticks pointing out that have the weight of a sweater on them! I love circulars for that reason. But you don't even have to do that. Just work flat and turn your work.

JOuf

amy
02-02-2005, 05:39 PM
Oooh, Jouf, you have both sets, eh? Just curious, how do they compare? I've never tried the Denise set.

I have an old Boye set from the 60's, in addition to a modern set. It's great to have two sets, because using two circulars is a pleasant way of doing small diameter circular knitting. If I hadn't already accumulated all my DPN's, I'd probably just use the two circulars all the time, to be thrifty. But I do like my DPN's, so I tend to use them. I could see getting used to two circulars, though, it's a nice way to work, too. Of course you can also do ML knitting, and do literally all of your knitting with a single interchangeable set. But I'm not a big fan of ML, personally. Nice to know for when I'm in a pinch, but not my prefered method.

Yvonne, you and I are true Boye-converts. I love my set too. Yes, they are so smooth. I've only used Addi's once, but I definitely didn't knit faster with them! (They were a 16" circular, which don't have as much needle to grab onto--so it might not have been a fair test, compared with the more substantial Boye's. But it did leave me with renewed appreciation for my Boyes!)

I do use the tightening tool, too, but much prefer the rubber-glove material for a grip. I actually bent my little tool thingy, because I got so much torque with that grip! LOL. Maybe that's why they give you one with less grip, for muscle-gals like me! LOL.

Nuno, I'd search around for reviews of that set. Bamboo can have flaws, like Marnie was saying, and you want to make sure it's got a good join, etc.

Marnie
02-02-2005, 06:43 PM
My bad on the Boye/Boyle bit eek.
Anyway, I can speak to my opinion of Denise, and I think there are a couple points of note.
1. I've never had my cable come unattached from my needle, but people who twist their needles while working may have trouble. In my search of reviews more folks have had trouble with the Boye needles coming unscrewed than the Denise.
2. Denise needles appear to be airport friendly for both national and international flights, while metal needles are a bit more likely to be rejected when flying overseas.
3. My Denise are great with most natural fibers and many man made but have been terrible with microfiber yarns as well as some of the really acrylicy yarns. Metal might be more forgiving there.
4. The smallest size available in Denise is 5 and that size is nearly unusable because the cords and the needles are the same diameter. If you prefer finer gauges, Boye is probably the better choice.

Jouf
02-02-2005, 07:27 PM
I agree with Marnie on all points!! I have both sets now. And I like both for different reasons. I think with the Boyes perhaps I wasn't tightening them enough - was afraid to ruin them. And they did come apart on me.

Jouf

Hildegard_von_Knittin
02-02-2005, 10:49 PM
Marnie, I don't understand why the needle and the cable being the same diameter would make a difference in the size 5s. Can you explain? I was almost certain I'd like the Denise better, because the yarn is easier for me to control on plastic (I prefer bamboo to plastic, but plastic to metal)... but I don't want to buy a set where I can't use one of the needle sets! Thanks!

Jouf
02-02-2005, 11:49 PM
Hilde - you can use them. I think I complained when I first saw how big the cable was, but I used them on the vest I made for the ribbing, and it was fine.

Actually, I like Denise needles just fine now. I think once I tighten down the Boyes, I'll like them too. Right now I just keep checking them every little bit to see if they're coming loose again - and they were! Didn't realize you have to REALLY tighten them.

Denises just sort of twist and lock in place and don't come undone.

So if you don't need size 4, 3, or 2 - go with the Denises.

Jouf!

Marnie
02-03-2005, 01:01 AM
I have found the #5s very hard to use. With straight needles, the rigidity of the needles makes the stitches slide easily, but because the Denise cords are very flexible, it's exceedingly hard to move ones stitches around when using the #5s. That's been my experience, and several others have echoed it, but I really love my Denise's and wouldn't trade them in. They are very light, portable, airline safe, and the tips are very pointy and smooth.

foldedbird
02-03-2005, 02:17 AM
When I first realized there was a brand of needles with the same moniker as moi, I was really unfazed. But it's really starting to get to my head! Just look at all of this!

Some irrelevant text may have been left out to suit my purposes.

Anyway, I can speak to my opinion of Denise, and I think there are a couple points of note.
The most popular...Denise (goes without saying)
Nuno, I just bought...Denise (gee, you must have spent a fortune)
I've never tried...Denise (whatcha waiting for?)
Denise appears to be airport friendly for both national and international flights, while metal needles are a bit more likely to be rejected when flying overseas. (I do *love* to fly, but sure am sorry my ole' drinkin buddy Metal can't hang with me anymore)
My Denise are great with most natural fibers and many man made but have been terrible with microfiber yarns as well as some of the really acrylicy yarns. (once I get better at knitting, I'm sure this will pass)
The smallest size available in Denise is 5 (not since I was 10, but thanks!)
I was almost certain I'd like the Denise better...(well of course you do!)
Actually, I like Denise just fine now...(see above)
Denises just sort of twist and lock in place and don't come undone. (I've been told before that I'm stubborn.)
So if you don't need size 4, 3, or 2 - go with the Denises. (are you calling me fat?!?)
That's been my experience, and several others have echoed it, but I really love my Denise's and wouldn't trade them in. (Can't you see that everyone is fighting over me?)

Kiri
02-03-2005, 03:45 AM
EK -

That is for the whole set. Sizes 4-12 plus (a rather tacky) carrying case.

Ooooohhh :oops:
I thought that was just for one pair of needles. So I'm really shocked with the LYS because they wanted $20 for one pair of wooden needles.

Were they made of some rare wood?

Kiri
02-03-2005, 03:50 AM
As a beginner (meaning I usually need to buy needles for every new project) and a "starving student", price is a major issue for me.

I've been using Aero circular needles, and Susan Bates straights. They go for about $5-8 CDN, and are your basic aluminum type-needles.

They work just fine for me.

Marnie
02-03-2005, 11:26 AM
Denise,
Obviously we're all fighting over you under the guise of discussing needles.

beldaraan
02-03-2005, 12:54 PM
Some irrelevant text may have been left out to suit my purposes.

Gotta read the fine print :D

amy
02-03-2005, 06:29 PM
Denise/Foldedbird, you crack me up! ROFL! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Amy

foldedbird
02-03-2005, 06:52 PM
Denise,
Obviously we're all fighting over you under the guise of discussing needles.

I've suspected as much all along!

Hildegard_von_Knittin
02-03-2005, 10:26 PM
So I was reading the "Denise" posts, but substituting in various dirty words/body parts for "Denise" (yes i have too much timeon my hands)... pretty funny.