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Holly
05-20-2005, 12:45 PM
I've never read any books by Debbie Macomber, but I'm in the middle of "The Shop on Blossom Street" and I love it! I read a profile of this author in a knitting mag (she is a devoted knitter :D ), and the book is all about a woman opening a yarn shop and a group of diverse women starting her beginning knitting class :XX: The pattern for the project in the "beginning knitting class" is in the front of the book! I see that the sequel (sp?) to this book is currently out in hardback.

Holly[/url]

brookenic
05-20-2005, 12:47 PM
I'll have to check for that one at the library today. It sounds interesting.

1to1
05-20-2005, 01:53 PM
Another reason to go to the library after work today.

Knitting for Dummies
The Shop on Blossom Street

Anything else I should be looking for?

1to1
05-20-2005, 02:34 PM
Just checked the library website and there is a sequel to The Shop on Blossom Street called A Good Yarn. Of course, they are all checked out so I'm on the hold list. :rollseyes:

Egeria
05-20-2005, 03:14 PM
I'm headed for my library tomorrow, will definately have to check it out!

Holly
05-20-2005, 03:16 PM
:study: I wish we had a nice library in our town. We have a small, volunteer run, donation library. A library card for one of the regular libraries in the next town over is over $100 (it is exactly what is earmarked from property taxes for the library). I'm currently weighing the pros and cons of purchasing a card. I love buying paperbacks, and I'm not sure I want the responsibility of library books at the camper, pool, etc... Hmmm -- I know I will covet "A Good Yarn" when I finish this book!
Holly

Rennagayle
05-20-2005, 04:05 PM
Our town has a dinky little library with only a few knitting books, and most of them were published before I was even born. :rollseyes: However, they do have Debbie Macomber's The Shop on Blossom Street, which I read a few weeks ago and LOVED. I discovered it quite by accident when I typed in "knitting" on the library's website search engine.

feministmama
05-20-2005, 04:56 PM
Has anyone read Knitting by Anne Bartlett? It's a novel about two women who connect thru knitting

feministmama
05-20-2005, 05:08 PM
I just won a copy of The shop on Blossom st for $1.95 on E-bay!!!!

brookenic
05-20-2005, 05:09 PM
:thumbsup: Nice Job!! Enjoy :D

Anne
05-20-2005, 06:51 PM
I have read both of Debbie's books that were mentioned, Excellent reading. I signed on to her mailing list and received a packet of coffee, bookmarker, stickers etc.

The Elm Creek Quilt Novels by Jennifer Chiaverini are also a great read.

Rennagayle
05-21-2005, 10:18 AM
I hope others add more titles for us. I'll print off this page the next time I go to the library. :D

VictoiseC
05-21-2005, 12:25 PM
Oh wow, this is great. thanks for those titles. Funny, I'm a writer (or was, or might be) and I wrote my first novel, completed last fall but haven't sold it annnnnnnnnd with my newly found obssession (well not that new) of knitting, I have been contemplating the next novel to include knitting.

More to the point, a story about a city woman and a country woman who has sheep and spins and all that and they exchange places.

Soooooo, I can't wait to read these novels. THANKS! :D

And, I CANNOT believe a library charges for a card. That is so totally unAmerican, what the hell is that? A library is the most important place in the universe (well, aside from a couple of others I can think of) and the library is where I spent my entire childhood. That is so wrong. I mean, I could see maybe $5 for something but $100?????
That is WRONG. :fingerwag:

Oh, I stumbled across this book at the library a couple days ago, thought it might be mambypamby or silly, but as it turns out, it was just what I needed this week and I'm really loving it.
The Knitting Sutra Craft As a Spiritual Practice
by Susan Gordon Lydon
Some really interesting facts too, like how Ralph Lauren tried to take credit for these Canadian Indians age old designs on his sweaters.... and how these women in the Hebrides Islands always made their sweaters a little too small, then stretched them, to save on the amount of wool ... they had to knit a sweater a WEEK to put food on the table for their families. Interesting huh?
ciao for now, Vic

Rennagayle
05-21-2005, 12:43 PM
Hey, Vic, if you need anyone to proofread your new novel, I'm sure you could find plenty of takers here. :happydance:

I live inside our city limits, so my library card is free, but a couple of years ago, they began charging $40 per year per family for anyone living outside the city limits. If I were to live outside the limits, I'd have no choice but to pay it, as I can't imagine being without my card, but I sure as heck wouldn't like it. :mad:

Holly
05-23-2005, 01:25 PM
:happydance: Love all the great book references -- thanks! I'm definately checking out the Anne Bartlett book :study:

The explanation I rec'd regarding the library charging a fee for their card is that the town residents pay a portion of property tax for the library district. Therefore, they charge out of town people the same amout that is paid through property taxes. I haven't been in our little library for a while; maybe I'll give them another look-see. I hadn't even thought of checking out knitting reference books -- that is a great idea.

Holly

hedgehog
05-23-2005, 02:36 PM
My favorite literature genre is historical fiction.

I think if i were a writer i'd write about the women in Europe who knitted for the men in service and for themselves during the wars. Imagine having a real, immediate and grave purpose for knitting (keeping your children warm, keeping the service men kitted out, passing the time in the subways during the blitz with other strong women... ) It'd be a much different task.

I'm a real sucker for "the greatest generation"....

-hh

PurlyGyrl
05-23-2005, 02:45 PM
Thanks for info about the knitting books! I'll have to check those out! :thumbsup:

Hey, HedgeHog! I love the 1940s/WWII era too! Have you checked out the Victoria and Albert museum online (vam.ac.uk in the Collections > Fashion, Jewellery & Accessories > Knitting > 1940s Patterns to Knit) They have some really cool 1940 knitting patterns you can print. Neat stuff but too advanced for me! :blush:

Stonington
05-23-2005, 02:56 PM
I am visiting the library this afternoon after work... yay something new to look for! Thanks so much.. hope this thread continues.. :thumbsup: I love new book suggestions! :heart:

VictoiseC
05-24-2005, 11:12 AM
I understand the fee now, it's for out of towners. Didn't notice that before.

The only problem with checking out knitting books from the library (I've done it) is they are FILTHY. It's like 1,000 people have had them laying around and eating while they looked at them. I joined Crafters Club so I could get 5 new books, nice and clean. It's a good deal, except it's taken me almost 4 months and I still haven't received the 5th book. They are something else.... at one point they sent me a late fee and I hadn't received 3 of the books. A lot of agravation but I wanted all these books!

I originally looked at the Big Book of Knitting Stitches from the library and that got me going on joining the club coz I really wanted it as a reference book for new stitches. Maybe your library is cleaner! (after all I am in the new york city)

Stonington
05-24-2005, 11:17 AM
mmm our town library does not have much at all. I work in South Portland so I think I can join the Portland Library free. Will have to go check out what they have. Happy Book Hunting! :sunny:

VictoiseC
05-24-2005, 11:25 AM
omg, PurlyDenise... that is an incredible site!!!!!! The V & A collectyion of knitting stuff. I just downloaded a pattern.
But who the heck would want to make "severed thumb gloves"
Ooooohhhh, doesn't that sound skanky?

HEY! How did Amy get on the victoria & albert site? What a shock! What an honour. And did she put it there or mention it here?
That is very cool.

thanks for the tip....

P.S. WOW, I was just looking at all those 1940 patterns, what a hoot! Isn't it fantastic how they're giving away all these patterns for free! Amazing site!

Rennagayle
05-24-2005, 11:27 AM
Hedgehog,

My favorite literature genre is historical fiction.

I think if i were a writer i'd write about the women in Europe who knitted for the men in service and for themselves during the wars. Imagine having a real, immediate and grave purpose for knitting (keeping your children warm, keeping the service men kitted out, passing the time in the subways during the blitz with other strong women... ) It'd be a much different task.

I'm a real sucker for "the greatest generation"....


I share that same passion. I read a book by Rosamund Pilcher last year (all her books, actually). I can't recall the title offhand, and it was nothing to do with knitting, but it gave me such a close-up and personal view of what it was like for (European) families during wartime, in a way that I'd never before understood. Now, if she'd just thrown knitting in there, it would have been a perfect book! :D

Victoise, I know what you mean about dirty books at the libary. I've never thought of our library books as being dirty, as they're relatively clean, but I have a super sensitive nose and allergies to cigarette smoke. My nose starts itching so bad, I just about rub it off my face when I'm around it. The same thing happens if I try to read a book that has been checked out by a smoker. I also get a headache. When I check out a book, the first thing I have to do is open it up and smell it. I can immediately tell if it's been previously checked out by a smoker; if so, I cannot get it. :(

Holly
05-25-2005, 10:12 AM
Rennagayle -- I love Rosamunde Pilcher! When it comes to setting a scene so you really feel like you are there, she takes the cake :D Holly

Rennagayle
05-25-2005, 11:40 AM
Holly, isn't that the truth! Her books are the kind that I nearly get depressed over the thought of getting to the end of the book. :verysad: She so deeply involves you in the lives of her characters that you practically feel like they're family; and no, I'm not some kook that can't define the line between reality and fiction like a soap opera addict, the author is just that good! :mrgreen:

I have actually read Winter Solstice two times, which is practically unheard of for me (to want to reread a fiction book).

brookenic
05-25-2005, 01:31 PM
I finished The Shop on Blossom Street last night. I loved it. I have A Good Yarn on hold at the library now. The first one was so good. Off topic, I'm also reading a Rose Kennedy bio. It's really good. :D

JLC
05-26-2005, 01:21 PM
I'm so excited. I took my kids to the library yesterday after I got out of work, and they actually had "The Shop on Blossom Street". I live in a small town with a fairly small library, so I was really surprised when I saw the book. I'll have to check for the Anne Bartlett book the next time I'm in. My problem is, I'm a knitting junkie and a book addict, with 2 young boys and not a lot of time. Do I knit or do I read?....I guess I should be looking for books on cd, then I could have both?! :??

ekgheiy
05-26-2005, 01:34 PM
... Do I knit or do I read?....I guess I should be looking for books on cd, then I could have both?! :?? I am totally torn with this too. :verysad: I have so many books that I want to read, but knitting kept winning. I do think, however, that with my recent piggy-bank demolition (my car was bellowing smoke and had to get repaired last week), I won't be doing much knitting unless I strictly use stash yarn. My stash isn't uniform enough to be able to make much of anything. :( Anyhoooo.... since I already have the books, I shall soon be forced into choosing reading. But that's okay though ... my "book stash" is quite developed ... :mrgreen: :oops:

Holly
05-26-2005, 01:41 PM
:figureditout: Excellent solution! I also have the same problem -- too many hobbies, a family and a fairly heavy TV load ;) Something has to give! Do libraries carry books on tape to check out?

Holly

Rennagayle
05-26-2005, 01:45 PM
Our small library has a wide selection of audio books, though not nearly as wide a selection as there are regular paper books. I checked out Winter Solstice, by Rosamund Pilcher last winter, to listen to as I crafted (before I discovered knitting). I loved listening to it as I worked, but having actually read the book (twice) beforehand, I quickly discovered that the audio version was abridged, shortened for length, I presume. :?

ekgheiy
05-26-2005, 01:46 PM
:figureditout: Excellent solution! I also have the same problem -- too many hobbies, a family and a fairly heavy TV load ;) Something has to give! Do libraries carry books on tape to check out?

Holly Yep ... many do carry them ;)

brookenic
05-26-2005, 02:06 PM
My library has a ton of books on tape. It awesome to sit there and knit while someone reads to me!

VickiIL
05-26-2005, 02:16 PM
I love books on tape. The kids and I listen to them in the car. I also love to listen to them while I clean. (Actually motivates me to keep cleaning!)

ekgheiy
05-26-2005, 03:36 PM
Books on Tape are kinda dangerous. :mrgreen: I was listening to one in car one time ... got so engrossed with the story, lost track of the ROAD!!!! YIKES :shock: :blush:

JLC
05-26-2005, 03:46 PM
Books on Tape are kinda dangerous. :mrgreen: I was listening to one in car one time ... got so engrossed with the story, lost track of the ROAD!!!! YIKES :shock: :blush:

That would totally be me!! I zone out when I read, something could blow up beside me and I probably wouldn't notice. I would definitely be a road hazard if I listened to a book on tape while driving. But listening while being a passenger...on the way to a yarn shop...while also knitting, would probably be ok!! :D

ekgheiy
05-26-2005, 04:06 PM
....But listening while being a passenger...on the way to a yarn shop...while also knitting, would probably be ok!! :DTHAT WOULD SO RAWK DUDE (or DUDETTE? :oops:) *giggle*

hedgehog
05-26-2005, 04:31 PM
Hello Ladies!

I haven't had a chance to check this thread in a few days but wanted to say a huge thank you for the suggestions!!

I have briefly checked out the Vic and Al Museum pages and was duely inspired! There's something kinda cool about recreating the (not so distant) past from actual blueprints. I was also checking out the Vogue Vintage Knits (http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1931543003/ref=lpr_g_1/103-5627722-7306209?v=glance&s=books) book last night at the bookstore. It's mostly patterns from the 50's and 60's (not enough 40's.. boo, hiss!) However the men's sweaters were gorgeous!

As for Rosamunde Pilcher, i can't say that i had ever read anything by her or had even heard of her until i checked her books out yesterday. I didn't realize that she's the one who wrote "The Shell Seekers". My mother loves that book and we just watched the movie about a month ago. It was good (and made me VERY homesick for the UK! LOL!.. I love St. Ives.. *sigh*) I'll have to check out more of her work.

Thanks again!
-hh

1to1
05-27-2005, 11:47 AM
The Shop on Blossom Street-I got it from the library and it is a very good book. One that you can't put down.

Now I'm on hold for A Good Yarn. I went to the used books store and bought some other books by Debbie's books. I hope they're as enjoyable. I think I'll check and see if I can get it online.

I would definitely recommend it. :thumbsup: