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Lindsey H
12-02-2005, 07:13 AM
I just read Shawna's thread with the beautiful snow picture and now I am just wondering, how many of us homeschool? I homeschool my 7yo son. I still find plenty of time for knitting :D

kayeknit
12-02-2005, 09:01 AM
Hello. I homeschool my eight-year-old daughter. Life is still so busy though. I don't know how I would manage if I had to work outside the home. I always find some time to do the many things (including knitting) that I love to do, though. Life is good. :D

VickiIL
12-02-2005, 10:36 AM
I homeschool my 1st grader and preschooler.

sogrammatical
12-02-2005, 11:44 AM
Just out of curiosity, why do you guys choose to homeschool your kids? Are you going to continue to homeschool them, or will they eventually go to public/private school?

knitncook
12-02-2005, 12:39 PM
We homeschool our three kids ages 13, 10, and 7. We LOVE it! We have tried at various times using public schools, but they just aren't a good match for our kids. There is so much that I can offer them that traditional schooling can't. Our son is also autistic and school was an absolute disaster for him. He is thriving at home! We have no plans for our children to ever go to traditinal schooling unless they want to. Considering my oldest plans to have her AA before her public school friends have their high school diplomas, I can't see her ever wanting to go back to school. My kids never talk about the things that they miss by being homeschooled, but they talk all the time about the things that they would miss out on if they were in a traditional school setting. Today is a typical day. It's 10:30 and I'm still in my jammies. I have one watching a Harry Potter Movie, one creating a costume of Medusa for a birthday party she is going to tomorrow and my third is still asleep. She's a night owl and usually is tucking *me* into bed :roflhard: We'll all be up and going in the next hour. We will have some lunch and head outside to enjoy the lovely weather we have. Later we will be involved in various projects such as rubber stamping, knitting, reading, chatting with friends on the computer, and trying to figure out how toilets flush.

Carol_OH
12-02-2005, 12:51 PM
drat, just posted a long post and it disappeared!

I 'unschooled' my son for high school who's now at nearly 18 years old taking the GED and applying for college.

this book helped us both with the transition:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0962959170/104-6154329-2218352?v=glance&n=283155

I'm also a huge fan of John Taylor Gatto. :thumbsup:

Anyhoo, my son's needs weren't addressed by the small public school system. I'd elaborate more but I'm afraid my post will disappear again!

feministmama
12-02-2005, 01:15 PM
Wow! y'all are very lucky. You don't hear too many people talk about how good their life is. Spread somma dat good feelings around :lol:

brightspot
12-02-2005, 01:31 PM
I homeschool my 3. Mike is 15, Kim is 13, and Nicole is 11. They are in grades 6, 8, and 9-11. :D We were using an out of state school for their schooling. When my son wanted to change schools we found out that it wasn't accredited. He should be a junior this year. He had a choice to take his GED or start over in 9th grade. He chose to start over. :cheering: I still don't believe it. What 15 year old wants to add 2 years. He is doing great though. Even though he started 2 months late he is ahead. He has done a year of Algebra in 4 weeks and a year of physical science in 6 weeks. I am glad he started over though, because his last school didn't require any writing. This is almost all writing. He was having fits to start, (all day to write 3 paragraphs). But now he gets carried away and writes 7 pages when only 4 have to be done. His teacher can't believe the change so soon. Oh, they all go to school online now. They are public schools, but they do it all on the internet. It is so cool and easier for me.

CarmenIbanez
12-02-2005, 02:56 PM
I also have an autistic son. He is 13 now, and if I hadn't been hired last year at a warm and fuzzy small private school as a teacher last year, I'd be homeschooling my baby too. I am lucky that our little school goes to grade 12, so he is nice and set.

His 5th grade year was his first out of special day class and it was okay. But 6th grade (middle school) was a total disaster. Even in the suburbs, there are more kids in a middle school than there were in my high school. Now that I am a teacher I can appreciate that there is no way to offer a quality education to children when you teach 200 different kids a day!

But I digress. I was just about to pull him out of public school to homeschool him when I was offered a teaching job. Now we go to school together, which is almost as nice as homeschooling and we love our schedule. The hubmeister is also a teacher, so we really have tons of time together, which is awesome!

I am jealous I'm not in my jammies right now, but in one week, when winter break starts, I will be!

Lindsey H
12-02-2005, 04:24 PM
Our son went to a private Christian school last year for kindergarten and he did very well academically. He is bright and like every little boy has a lot of energy. He got in trouble a lot because he finished his work quickly and would start talking and playing. Public school just is not a option for us. Most importantly because we want his education to be based on a Biblical worldview. Also because Ben tends to get "lost" in a crowd and cannot focus on what is going on around him. He is a smart little guy and he would get into so much trouble because he cannot sit still :D . We love homeschooling :cheering:. We can progress at Ben's rate and go as fast as he needs to go. Also, we get to do fun school projects. We are studying Mesopotamia and today we made cuneiform tablets with Sculpey. The best part is that Ben gets to spend a lot of time with his baby brother. They are such great friends :thumbsup:

VickiIL
12-02-2005, 04:24 PM
Our reasons for homeschooling have changed. Now I simply LOVE the lifestyle. I love watching my kids lightbulbs go on. I love the freedom we have to learn what we want to. I love how the kids get excited about topics and start asking questions and going off on little "rabbit trails" that interest them. Ilove how close my children are and how we pile on the sofa to read our books. And I really love that my children love these things as well. We just love homeschooling.

Originally we started because I knew my son would not meet his potential in the public school. He has a severe speech disorder and adhd and the too make it difficult for him to pay attention and he can have extra difficulty in reading since speech and literacy are so closely related. I knew I would be able to offer more attention than a teacher with 20+ kids could give. Of course one can never say "Never" since we don't know what the future holds; but right now I can't see any reason why I would ever put my children in public school.

DotMom61
12-02-2005, 04:36 PM
Raising my hand,too!!

I home school both our children -- DS, age 11; DD, age 7-1/2. We started homeschooling DS first. He is an extremely intelligent kid w/ non-traditional learning style, and P.S. just didn't work for him. We tried a local school for "gifted" kids, but the political environment there was *horrible.* So, we took the plunge & started homeschooling just DS while DD went to public K. She loved k'garten, but when we offered her the chance to homeschool for 1st grade, she jumped on it.

A few days ago, we were driving in the car, and I was having one of those days where I was wondering whether or not they are missing out on too much by being homeschooled. I asked them both, "Do you guys every wish you were back in school?" And they both, together, yelled, "No!!!" It was so funny, and just what I needed to hear!

They are both doing well despite our frequent interruptions due to DS's cancer treatments. We are gradually getting back onto a more consistent routine, but we all struggle with that. Overall, though, we *love* that we homeschool and are quite enamored with the flexibility it provides us.

I could go on ...

... but I won't. ;-)

DotMom61
12-02-2005, 04:36 PM
Hello. I homeschool my eight-year-old daughter. Life is still so busy though. I don't know how I would manage if I had to work outside the home. I always find some time to do the many things (including knitting) that I love to do, though. Life is good. :D

Kaye --

Where in the Louisville area do you live? We lived out in LaGrange for about 5 years. Loved it there!!

wewantmore
12-02-2005, 10:11 PM
We are homeschooling as well.

Pensguys
12-03-2005, 08:26 AM
We homeschool too!!!! We love it!!

Get schoolwork done, chores done, then I can KNIT!!!!

Jazzmatazz
12-03-2005, 09:51 AM
I'm a second grade public school teacher. My hat is off to homeschooler parents. I don't know how you do it...I always had the hardest time working with my own kids at home. You have to be extremely disciplined and organized. Do any of you plan to do this all the way through grade 12?

VickiIL
12-03-2005, 10:30 AM
I'm a second grade public school teacher. My hat is off to homeschooler parents. I don't know how you do it...I always had the hardest time working with my own kids at home. You have to be extremely disciplined and organized. Do any of you plan to do this all the way through grade 12?

That is the plan...Although we do evaluate every year...But I can't imagine why the plan might change.

DotMom61
12-03-2005, 10:42 AM
I'm a second grade public school teacher. My hat is off to homeschooler parents. I don't know how you do it...I always had the hardest time working with my own kids at home. You have to be extremely disciplined and organized. Do any of you plan to do this all the way through grade 12?

That is the plan...Although we do evaluate every year...But I can't imagine why the plan might change.

Likewise -- or at least until DC qualify to take community college classes -- that won't be for a few years! :rofling:

And, as for the discipline & organization, well, it helps, but I really feel that homeschooling liberates you from some of that. I was getting *really* burned out on everything school-related -- like projects being assigned at the last minute, and all the paper that kept coming home. It would never fail that we would make plans to do something, and DS would come home and say he had to build an earthquake-proof tower by Monday or something like that. I do NOT miss those days!!! Now we only build earthquake-proof towers because we want to!!

Also, the flexibility of changing things as you go along is a bonus. If we're doing something and it's not working, we're free to junk it and switch to something else. My biggest thing right now is realizing that we don't have to do everything at once AND we don't have to be doing things just like they're doing them in school.

VickiIL
12-03-2005, 10:56 AM
I agree with Julie. Homeschooling is liberating. We have a crazy schedule that would never work with a child in public school. Yet we are able to accomidate that in our homeschool.

knitncook
12-03-2005, 11:06 AM
Yes; with three kids and three different needs being flexible is the key word. We don't do "school at home" We don't sit at the table and do schoolish work. It's funny, but I feel for the poor school teachers. They have 20+ kids with 20+ learning styles and 20+ individual needs. My thinking is that they have to be disciplined and organized :) My kids are free to homeschool as long as they want. We don't do testing. It isn't required where we are and how we choose to homeschool. I figure testing is for teachers who have 20+ kids and need to know how all of them are progressing. With three that get lots of individual attention, I know if they've gotten something or not. We get a lot of grief from my parents who recognize and acknowledge that our kids are "uber bright" but they just can't grasp that they are actually learning stuff since we don't have tests or lots of paperwork showing it.

Right now we are working on making a dog sweater for my parents' dog. The sweater pattern I found has lots of measurements and we've been talking about porportions. Everyone is going to knit a row or two on this sweater and we are going to work together to figure out how to take a sweater meant for a Boxer and turn it into a sweater for a chihuahua/miniature schnauzer.

DotMom61
12-03-2005, 11:13 AM
Right now we are working on making a dog sweater for my parents' dog. The sweater pattern I found has lots of measurements and we've been talking about porportions. Everyone is going to knit a row or two on this sweater and we are going to work together to figure out how to take a sweater meant for a Boxer and turn it into a sweater for a chihuahua/miniature schnauzer.

Oooo, Michelle, what a great math idea!!! Love it!

Jan in CA
12-03-2005, 01:52 PM
*really* burned out on everything school-related -- like projects being assigned at the last minute,

My kids are grown and we didn't homeschool them, but I had to laugh at this line. There may have been times when something was "assigned" last minute, but more often than not it was simply that the kid "remembered" it at the last minute. 9pm at night-"Oh mom! I have to write a paper on the industrial revolution in China and it's DUE tomorrow!!" Argghhh..

I will add that although we didn't homeschool we spent a huge amount of time in museums and the like and were always in "teach" mode anyway. My hats off to you who do this, both professionally and at home!

Pensguys
12-03-2005, 04:13 PM
I agree with Julie!!!! VERY liberating and I can set my OWN schedule. It sure is nice to not have to rush out of the house on those cold mornings!

caviar
12-04-2005, 01:08 AM
My oldest is only 2 1/2, but this is an issue I've been thinking about forever. I was a public school teacher, but as a child I went to seven different schools, public and private, so I have seen more than just one side of the question. We are still undecided about what will be best for our family, and with our second child just 4 months old, we are realizing that what works for one child may not work for another!!! :??

My question is this: are there any of you out there who have grown children who were homeschooled all or part of the time and have gone on to college/the workplace/family life? What do they say as adults now functioning in society-at-large? This movement is not new, but it's popularity has grown in recent years, so I would be interested in any feedback from people who have seen the whole experience play out.

Kirstin

Phretys
12-04-2005, 04:05 AM
I applaud all of those parents who are able and willing to homeschool. My daughter is in a public elementary school, and lucky for me she's thriving. But I see so many different learning styles among the kids in our school district, and it's hard to see a lot of them struggle.

In California you need a teaching credential to homeschool, and I know of a few parents at my daughter's school who are in credential programs who on one hand would like to become teachers (one wants to work with special ed kids), but who would also like the option to homeschool their own children should the local schools not meet their needs. Getting credentialed is not cheap, and most of the homeschoolers in my area seem to be in the upper/middle-class bracket.

There is this cool charter high school in my area where more than 50% of the student body has been previously homeschooled. The school has no athletics teams and is purely academic. Sometimes classes are held outdoors under a shade tree on a nice day. The kids reportedly don't form cliques in the way they do at a regular high school. I think in 2003 the school had one of the highest PSAT scores in the county. And most of the students are college-bound.

I read in the paper a couple of weeks ago about how the University of California is modifying its admissions process to accomodate the growing number of homeschooled students. :thumbsup:

Debi

Virtuella
12-04-2005, 08:02 AM
I am reading and reading, and I think I dont quite understand what homescool is.
Could anyone please give me a definition?

(My kids go to a private school, because I dont think the ordinary scool is the best alternative.)

kayeknit
12-04-2005, 08:41 AM
I am reading and reading, and I think I dont quite understand what homescool is.
Could anyone please give me a definition?

(My kids go to a private school, because I dont think the ordinary scool is the best alternative.)

Hello there!! Homeschooling is just what it implies: schooling at home. It is very individualistic. Some people follow a curriculum, as the child would in a school. Others do what is called "unschooling", which I believe means allowing your child's interests lead them into learning about many different things in their own way. Personally, I make up my own curriculum, using textbooks and workbooks I pick up from used bookshops, thrift stores, etc. So, as you can see, there really is no strict "definition" of homeschooling, other than learning at home rather than in a school setting. :D

Virtuella
12-04-2005, 09:13 AM
I am reading and reading, and I think I dont quite understand what homescool is.
Could anyone please give me a definition?

(My kids go to a private school, because I dont think the ordinary scool is the best alternative.)

Hello there!! Homeschooling is just what it implies: schooling at home. It is very individualistic. Some people follow a curriculum, as the child would in a school. Others do what is called "unschooling", which I believe means allowing your child's interests lead them into learning about many different things in their own way. Personally, I make up my own curriculum, using textbooks and workbooks I pick up from used bookshops, thrift stores, etc. So, as you can see, there really is no strict "definition" of homeschooling, other than learning at home rather than in a school setting. :D

Thanks, and how exiting!
Im not quite sure if that is allowed in Norway.. not going to school at all I mean! I know people do it, because you can read about it in the newspaper.
Exiting to read about so many doing this "over there"!!

I have some interesting discussions at work, not letting my children go to the ordinary school, they dont like me doing it, because they mean I spoil my children!
And an ex family (close) member told me that I dont trusted the system taking my children out of school... she made big trouble out of that.

knitncook
12-04-2005, 10:22 AM
We are pretty much "unschoolers." We don't have a set curriculum. The kids are thriving and able to do so much that interests them and in doing so we find ways to teach them things without them even realizing they are having a lesson.

I have several friends who have grown children that were un/homeschooled or have older teens that are un/homeschooled. Some have gone on to college. Others are continuing their home education (I guess you could say home colleged) and still others have found a career without further education. I know several computer programmers and entreprenuers. Photographers, musicians, gymnastics coach (in fact my dd's gymnastics coach is a "homeschool graduate" and she is just so happy in her life.) "Kids" starting their own careers and businesses without ever stepping foot for one day in a "real" school.

Oh and Debi, there are several ways in which to homeschool in California. You don't need a teacher's certificate. That is just one avenue to homeschooling. There are cover schools or umbrella schools that parents can sign up under if they don't have the credentials. There are changes being made in homeschooling laws all the time as states start to realize that homeschoolers are excelling even without a "teacher" in the house.

I wish I had been homeschooled, but at the time that I was in high school homeschooling was against the law where I lived. I missed all of 9th grade because of an illness and that was the best year of my life, despite being very sick and in pain. I was free to read what I wanted and learn what I wanted. I taught myself to type (on a 1930's typewriter no less) because writing was too painful. I learned so much, yet because I didn't have the attendance I had to repeat 9th grade. :( I was truly ready for something else, but "rules are rules" and they wouldn't promote me.

Carol_OH
12-04-2005, 12:41 PM
My unschooled 17.5 year old is getting ready for college. Here in Ohio it's quite easy to home or unschool.

My son has been running his own business since unschooling - check him out at www.ithinksw.com

Someone mentioned above about the whole 'socializing' aspect. I am of the mind that regular high school socializing does more harm than good. I believe that putting a bunch of teenagers together all the time is NOT healthy, and that we as a country should have more apprenticeship type programs in regular high schools so kids have more interaction with adults. But I digress.

My son is very well socialized - his friends are constantly over our house, helping us and him with things, and vice versa. Using the worry over socialization I think it just wrong! It's a scare tactic to keep kids in regular high schools.

Now, I'm not totally against regular school - I think some kids work very well in that type of environment. Though I must admit I think that large schools do a big disserve to the child/teen.

And I am also a big fan of school teachers. When I say anything negative about schools I am NOT saying anything negative about the teachers!

As a single mom, I got a LOT of negativity about pulling DS out of high school. But I knew in my heart it was the right thing for HIM.

shellebelle216
12-04-2005, 07:23 PM
My husband and I plan to homeschool whenever we have kids, but I have a question for all of you. Both of us are horrible in any sort of math. We have every other subject covered. How would we handle this?

Pensguys
12-04-2005, 07:30 PM
You have the Teacher's Manual. ;) Most of them help you explain the math and how to teach it.

We use RightStart and really like. Semi-scripted and semi-spiral...games and worksheets. Good for all learning types.

brightspot
12-04-2005, 09:29 PM
This number is for a math hotline (Fresno County Education Homework help line) :D 1-888-567-6284 They have math books from all over, so if it is a book from school they can go to the same page the child is on. Even without the book they are great tutors. It is a show on cable and if they get enough questions on a problem they do it on the air with the child. My son had a few problems I didn't understand and they got him thru them wonderfully. (I just called it to make sure it still works since we haven't used it in a few years :D )

knittingdoula
12-05-2005, 04:59 AM
In California you need a teaching credential to homeschool, and I know of a few parents at my daughter's school who are in credential programs who on one hand would like to become teachers (one wants to work with special ed kids), but who would also like the option to homeschool their own children should the local schools not meet their needs. Getting credentialed is not cheap, and most of the homeschoolers in my area seem to be in the upper/middle-class bracket.

Debi

Um, I believe this is a myth. You do NOT have to have a teaching credential to homeschool in any of the 50 states. You are free to educate your children as you see fit. You might have to provide proof eventually of some sort of teaching plan, but the requirements are pretty loose, and it depends more on how much the local school officials want to harass you than anything else. But a credential? Nope.

I homeschooled my son last year and then part of this year. After Liza's death, it became a little too much of a challenge, plus the new babe, so he now goes to a yeshiva day school. Loves it, too. The almost 2 hour commute stinks, but other than that, he's happy.

Alison

Sara
12-05-2005, 09:25 AM
Things are more stringent in NY. You don't have to have teaching credentials, but they do require lots of recordkeeping and proof of progress. We looked into homeschooling when we moved to Rochester.


I think Arizona has the least regulation of homeschooling in the country, and the most children who are homeschooled.

VickiIL
12-05-2005, 09:45 AM
A website that will tell you exactly the laws in your state is www.hslda.org

I am really lucky to be homeschooling in Illinois. Laws here state that I have to teach all the subjects that would normally be taught in Public School and that I teach in English. Pretty easy there.

Some states have requirements about record keeping, testing, approval of curriculum. But as far as I understand there isn't a state that requires credentials. It may be one option but there is always an option for an uncredentialed parent. If I am wrong that website would be the place to check.

DotMom61
12-05-2005, 11:07 AM
Someone mentioned above about the whole 'socializing' aspect. I am of the mind that regular high school socializing does more harm than good. I believe that putting a bunch of teenagers together all the time is NOT healthy, and that we as a country should have more apprenticeship type programs in regular high schools so kids have more interaction with adults. But I digress.

Amen to that, Carol! I feel the same way, but about every level of school. It became apparent to me when DS was in school that there is an unfortunately large population of parents that expect the school to raise their children. It's not the teacher's job to teach children good manners and good morals. OK ... I feel myself stepping up onto the soap box. So I'd better stop. :oops:

And I am also a big fan of school teachers. When I say anything negative about schools I am NOT saying anything negative about the teachers!

And, yes, along the same lines as above, I, too, have a lot of respect for good teachers. They have to put up with so much in the classroom, and they are asked to do an impossible job. I am in awe of those teachers who have the respect and admiration of their students.

CarmenIbanez
12-05-2005, 01:45 PM
I think it is so wonderful that some many people take their children's education so seriously. As a teacher, I really feel that the biggest problem in the public schools are parents who do not enforce any rules and do not require their children to meet any kind of academic or behavioral standards. I can't tell you how many times I have called a parent to talk to them only to have them say they either do not care, do not have time or simply do not believe me that there is any problem!

But I digress. :-)

knitncook
12-05-2005, 04:16 PM
I think it is so wonderful that some many people take their children's education so seriously. As a teacher, I really feel that the biggest problem in the public schools are parents who do not enforce any rules and do not require their children to meet any kind of academic or behavioral standards. I can't tell you how many times I have called a parent to talk to them only to have them say they either do not care, do not have time or simply do not believe me that there is any problem!

But I digress. :-)

That's one of the (many) reasons that we homeschool. Children whose parents are involved with their children. They want the schools to do everything including discipline. My ds went to school for one year and it was so hard on him. I assisted in his class a few days a week and the poor teacher spent more time disciplining than teaching. I felt so badly for her. She spends 7 years to get her master's degree in teaching and then becomes an underpaid babysitter. :( I know this isn't the case with all parents. It just seems more and more that parents are less and less involved overall. I was the default room mother because I was the only one who showed up and it was how I became PTA treasurer, too.