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View Full Version : ideas about painful hands...


beckyrhae
03-26-2006, 06:33 PM
:help: Ugh! I was a hairdresser for 12 years, so I am used to working with my hands, maybe it is the different way of holding things, but my hands really hurt sometimes! I'm sure once I have been knitting awhile it will go away.

I'm so enjoying knitting that I work thru it, or take an Aleve when it is time to marathon knit, but its not really joint pain, more like the muscle on my LEFT thumb. Any ideas?

Heh... I dont know my left from my right. :roflhard:

Ingrid
03-26-2006, 06:41 PM
My hands were very sore when I first got back into knitting with a vengence. My fingers would ache at night. That eventually stopped, but when I was knitting for hours a day, my left thumb wouldn't even bend sometimes or would get stuck in one position. I'd have to snap it back in place. This was all day, not just when I was knitting. Since I started taking breaks to come here, that went away and my thumb is back to normal.

If it's muscle pain, I imagine it's like any other exercise--your muscles will become accustomed.

Take breaks and stretch your hands and wiggle your fingers.

gardenmommy
03-26-2006, 06:48 PM
http://www.berroco.com/hg_workout.html

I saw this hand workout on the Berroco site. I used to have some gloves kind of like that many years ago since I'm also a medical transcriptionist, but I lost them and don't even remember if they worked!

knitstress_tygher
03-26-2006, 06:59 PM
If I sit for too long knitting my hands get tired too, so I've just learned to take breaks. even if it's just to flex and stretch my fingers. My mom had surgery on both hands for carpal tunnel, so I do everything I can to avoid it myself.

I have noticed tension in my back, between my shoulderblades .. guess knitting is just a pain all around, hmm? ;)

Yvonne
03-26-2006, 07:21 PM
http://www.berroco.com/hg_workout.html

I saw this hand workout on the Berroco site. I used to have some gloves kind of like that many years ago since I'm also a medical transcriptionist, but I lost them and don't even remember if they worked!


You are? I'm a medical transcriptionist too!

ecb
03-26-2006, 07:26 PM
I know I am well primed for Carpal Tunnel
but one thing I have noticed is that knitting seems to move different muscles than Mouse/keyboard work
the only panic/concerns I have had about carpal tunnel is that one morning I woke up to a numbhand and half forearm
since I knew that if it was carpal Tunnel it would only be my hand, I was relieved in a way

it turned out to be a pinched nerve in my Axillary (armpit)

gardenmommy
03-26-2006, 07:32 PM
http://www.berroco.com/hg_workout.html

I saw this hand workout on the Berroco site. I used to have some gloves kind of like that many years ago since I'm also a medical transcriptionist, but I lost them and don't even remember if they worked!


You are? I'm a medical transcriptionist too!

Certainly am! Do you work at home? I have for the past 9 1/2 years...can't believe it's been that long!

Weasley
03-26-2006, 08:54 PM
I am glad to hear that I am not the only one with pain in my hands and back. It surprised me, especially when I am only 30 and feel like arthritis is setting in. I did just start up with knitting again after having not knit in at least three months. I guess it is the muscles just getting used to it again.

My shoulders and back don't hurt as much when I place a pillow behind me, giving me a better upright posture. For my hands, all I do is take breaks and wiggle them around for a couple minutes. My left thumb likes to get stuck too sometimes. I thought it was because I am double jointed.

quirky
03-26-2006, 09:16 PM
I have arthritis and an extra long ulna bone. The ulna bone causes a pinched nerve in my ulna nerve and my thumbs will go numb. Its similar to carpal tunnel but a different cause.
Any way for the arthritis part I have discovered that Absorbine Jr. works great to sooth the pain. It works on the same concept as "icy hot" and the like but it lasts much longer in my opinion. And smells better too.
For the nerve stuff I am very careful with my posture and take frequent breaks. But the most important thing is posture! Its amazing how we compress, twist and scrunch our bodies and how that makes everything ache!

03-27-2006, 12:34 AM
I too have pain in my upper back area. I do notice that when I'm knitting that I catch myself with just my head bent forward. So that's why I'm so sore up there, but the other place I really hurt is my left finger/knuckles. The ones at the top of my hand. They just scream at me whenever I pick up my needles!!

I try to hold it a different way, but I can't seem to do that. Plus I don't notice myself gripping the needles hard at all??? So I'm not sure what that's all about.

But I just plow through the pain!! :X:


On a side note, I just finished my first dog sweater - kind of - I have to sew the top part and I don't get how to do it???!!!! I'm trying to read it out of SnB, and I watched Amy's video, but I'm still struggling. :help:

JennyLeah
03-27-2006, 03:46 AM
I have a touch of arthritis in my right hand, so I've chalked up any pain to that. It's been bad enough some days that I can't even pick up my needles!

I've noticed the sore neck and shoulders too, and I think the only way around that is to hold everything up differently somehow, so maybe it's eye level? But I can't imagine how to do that without making my arms feel like they're going to fall off. :lol: Ah well... it's a conundrum, no? I guess it's something you just get used to after a while?

Ronda
03-27-2006, 07:48 AM
http://www.berroco.com/hg_workout.html

I saw this hand workout on the Berroco site. I used to have some gloves kind of like that many years ago since I'm also a medical transcriptionist, but I lost them and don't even remember if they worked!


You are? I'm a medical transcriptionist too!

I am, too! LOL I type all day and come here when I get completely bored with work.

I have noticed that needles make a difference in how my hands feel. Some of my bamboo needles are great to work with. When I switch over to my metal needles (not Addi), I notice my hands hurt at first. I didn't notice any hand pain with my Addi needles, though.

Jax3303
03-27-2006, 09:32 AM
I also have arthritis, it gets really bad in my hands sometimes. I take my pain meds as normal, plus when the pain starts up I massage hand cream into my hands as often as I can. it really helps the achyness. Also, I've found that certain yarns (mainly rough acrylics) and aluminum needles make my hands act up more that others. Bamboo and plastic needles, and natural fibers, are my friends. I still use my metal needles, but not as often as I'd like to because of my hands.

Yvonne
03-27-2006, 01:41 PM
http://www.berroco.com/hg_workout.html

I saw this hand workout on the Berroco site. I used to have some gloves kind of like that many years ago since I'm also a medical transcriptionist, but I lost them and don't even remember if they worked!


You are? I'm a medical transcriptionist too!

I am, too! LOL I type all day and come here when I get completely bored with work.

I have noticed that needles make a difference in how my hands feel. Some of my bamboo needles are great to work with. When I switch over to my metal needles (not Addi), I notice my hands hurt at first. I didn't notice any hand pain with my Addi needles, though.


Yes, I've been working at home for eight years now! Between the typing, knitting and crocheting it's amazing our hands haven't fallen off by now, isn't it?

rebecca
03-27-2006, 04:57 PM
I have found that taking breaks & stretching helps a great deal, I also wear compression gloves when I'm knitting. Oh, Lonnie surprised me with a paraffin spa and that REALLY helps...love it for hands & feet :D

Tammy6071
03-27-2006, 11:22 PM
http://www.berroco.com/hg_workout.html

I saw this hand workout on the Berroco site. I used to have some gloves kind of like that many years ago since I'm also a medical transcriptionist, but I lost them and don't even remember if they worked!


You are? I'm a medical transcriptionist too!

I am, too! LOL I type all day and come here when I get completely bored with work.

I have noticed that needles make a difference in how my hands feel. Some of my bamboo needles are great to work with. When I switch over to my metal needles (not Addi), I notice my hands hurt at first. I didn't notice any hand pain with my Addi needles, though.


Yes, I've been working at home for eight years now! Between the typing, knitting and crocheting it's amazing our hands haven't fallen off by now, isn't it?

Me too!! Ive been working at home as a medical transcriptionist for 6 years and love it! When I need a break, I come here!

hedgehog
03-28-2006, 02:59 PM
my left thumb wouldn't even bend sometimes or would get stuck in one position. I'd have to snap it back in place.

Ingy,

You are HARD CORE! :notworthy: :roflhard:

-hh

Anya
03-28-2006, 10:12 PM
I've noticed the sore neck and shoulders too, and I think the only way around that is to hold everything up differently somehow, so maybe it's eye level? But I can't imagine how to do that without making my arms feel like they're going to fall off. :lol: Ah well... it's a conundrum, no? I guess it's something you just get used to after a while?

Luckily, I've had no pain in my hands, but my neck and upper back are killer when I knit for a while. One thing I've noticed that helps (other than holding the knitting up so my arms feel like falling off) is to watch tv when I knit. I don't watch anything that requires much attention (reality tv usually works well for this :lol: ) but I noticed that moving my head up and down every now and again makes it so my neck and back don't get all wonky. Hope this helps.