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View Full Version : weaving in the ends...am i missing something?


caviar
04-03-2006, 12:10 PM
Okay, recently I've been interested in Fair Isle techniques and I've learned how to weave the ends while knitting, as I go along. So I started thinking, why can't I just do this in regular knitting (when I change colors, start a new ball of yarn, etc.)? I've tried it, and it seems to work. Bye-bye tapestry needle!!! It's so fabulous that I'm thinking "surely there's a catch." So:

1. Does anyone know if there's a good reason not to use this technique in regular knitting? Is it a less durable method or something?

2. If there's no reason not too, I say jump on this bandwagon, everyone! It sure beats sitting around with an almost-finished object for two weeks before I finally do the weaving-finishing tasks that I hate most. This way weaving is almost like knitting. :cheering:

Feedback is so appreciated!

Kirstin

CarmenIbanez
04-03-2006, 12:45 PM
Consider the bandwagon jumped. What is this incredible technique to which you refer? Is there a video?

caviar
04-03-2006, 12:58 PM
I have heard there's a video at philosopher's wool, but my hardware and software are so ancient that I haven't been successful in viewing it. The technique is demonstrated in several knitting books in the Fair Isle sections. (Vogue is my fave). Because it's near at hand, though, I'll quote The Knitting Directory (B&N Bargain books section):

1. Insert the right-hand needle into the stitch knitwise, and lay the color yarn that is to be woven in over it. Use the working yarn to knit the stitch as usual, taking under the yarn to be woven in.

2. Use the working yarn to knit the following stitch, taking it over the yarn to be woven in. Follo0w your color patter, weaving the yarn not in use under and over the working yarn in at the back of your work.

Those are the directions for the knit row. Purl is similar; just make sure you're always weaving on the back side of the work. Sorry I can't include the pictures.

I tried this on a piece in regular stockinette stitch, and like I said, it SEEMS to have worked. We'll see if any more experienced knitters have negative input on the technique.

Kirstin

CarmenIbanez
04-03-2006, 01:07 PM
I am very excited. If only I had decided to try this BEFORE I was halfway done with a blanket.

Jan in CA
04-03-2006, 02:33 PM
Wouldn't this just take the yarn along in a straight line? I think you'd be more likely to have it unravel or pull out this way because it's not woven in. I could be wrong though if I'm misunderstanding.

I actually knit the yarn in if possible or use a duplicate stitch to weave it in the proper color. Weaving seems to be a necessary evil sometimes. :rollseyes:

Ingrid
04-03-2006, 04:15 PM
I do this all the time. I also twist the end around the working yarn a couple of times before catching it to give it extra hold. Nothing's fallen apart yet!

aylaanne
04-03-2006, 04:16 PM
Ingrid has spoken!

Ingrid
04-03-2006, 04:17 PM
Ingrid has spoken!

I did say 'yet.' :rofling:

aylaanne
04-03-2006, 04:19 PM
I did say 'yet.' :rofling:

Yeah, but with all the stuff you knit, I'm sure you'd know by now if something were to unravel.

I still can't visualize how exactly that works, but whatever. Once I figure it out, I'm gonna do it, because Ingrid says it works, and she's almost always right.

Ingrid
04-03-2006, 04:31 PM
Here's what I do. I insert the needle, bring the yarn you're done with under the working yarn, wrap it up over the right tip from back to front, clockwise. Wrap the working yarn, unwrap the yarn you're dropping and finish the stitch.
It should 'catch'. If it's an end that's being 'woven' in, I will wrap it around the working yarn every other stitch or so, too, just to be sure.

CarmenIbanez
04-03-2006, 04:40 PM
Amy needs to do a video. My brain hurts trying to imagine this. But I am going to try it!

Jan in CA
04-03-2006, 04:41 PM
Amy needs to do a video. My brain hurts trying to imagine this. But I am going to try it!

Yeah, I"m having trouble visualizing it, but I'll give it a try.

Ingrid
04-03-2006, 04:47 PM
It took me a while to figure it out from the description, and when I tried to show Amy, Jeremy and Lisa how to do it when we met, it was hard for me to slow down to demonstrate.

aylaanne
04-03-2006, 04:50 PM
It took me a while to figure it out from the description, and when I tried to show Amy, Jeremy and Lisa how to do it when we met, it was hard for me to slow down to demonstrate.
Well, I'll bring my camera in three weeks when we meet again, and I'll take a video. Then we can mess with it to slow it down. How's that?

I also plan on taking LOADS of pictures of everyone, so look nice.

Ingrid
04-03-2006, 04:55 PM
I'll make sure my hands are clean! :rofling:

NinaT
04-03-2006, 05:22 PM
I watched the video. What I didn't understand was the difference between the 3rd & 4th stitches. Which do you use when? They both seem like they weave or "trap" the yarn. Any ideas?

knittingdoula
04-03-2006, 07:22 PM
Ingrid has spoken!

I did say 'yet.' :rofling:

As The Yarn Harlot likes to say, "Pride goeth before the fall". (Yeah, I know it wasn't her quote, but you know what I mean ....)



Alison :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

Ingrid
04-03-2006, 07:30 PM
Ingrid has spoken!

I did say 'yet.' :rofling:

As The Yarn Harlot likes to say, "Pride goeth before the fall". (Yeah, I know it wasn't her quote, but you know what I mean ....)



Alison :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

As soon as I start feeling complacent or I feel like I've really got a grip on this thing, pffffft. Something goes majorly wrong. :rollseyes:

caviar
04-04-2006, 08:27 AM
Wouldn't this just take the yarn along in a straight line? I think you'd be more likely to have it unravel or pull out this way because it's not woven in. I could be wrong though if I'm misunderstanding.


A valid concern, so I knit up a swatch using two highly contrasting colors to see exactly what was going on. As it turns out, no it's not just a straight line, which is the good news. It's a pretty secure weave, so I have no fears using it to change using the same color from now on. On the right side of the work, things looked okay until I stretched it a little, at which point a little of the darker color "bled" through where it was woven behind the light. So probably from now on I'll weave same or similar color ends while knitting (the Hallelujah chorus begins) but weave with a tapestry needle when I switch colors so I can control where I put the yarn (small sigh). Hope that's helpful.

And if Ingrid has found a way to solve the "bleeding" problem I mentioned, I'd be happy to throw away the tapestry needle forever. (Okay, I still have to stitch stuff together, but stil...)

Kirstin

Ingrid
04-04-2006, 02:45 PM
That's always a consideration, especially with very dark behind very light. The weight and tension have an affect, too. With thin yarn on thin needles, it's not as much as an issue, if at all, as with looser stitches. It becomes a judgement call, depending on the materials and color.

aylaanne
04-04-2006, 02:59 PM
A valid concern, so I knit up a swatch using two highly contrasting colors to see exactly what was going on.
Can you post a pic so I can see it?