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Sweet_Thang
04-11-2006, 12:23 PM
Prolly a little TMI, but here goes.

I normally have dry skin ( i wash my hands, dishes, constantly). I use lotion every day (gold bond), but have noticed, moreso since I started to knit, that my hands, fingers are getting more dried out than normal. Even so, I now have a "cracked skin" on my right forefinger, in the "bend" near the tip.

They way I knit, I sometimes, accidently, push the end of my addi in that spot.. (not now, cuz it hurts like a son of a gun).

Do you guys have any recommendations for any really good hand lotions, etc that might help me prevent the dryness??? It's really driving me crazy when this happens!!

TIA
Lexie

Jan in CA
04-11-2006, 12:28 PM
While you're waiting for someone with more experience to answer....

I do find yarn very drying, some are worse than others I've noticed, too. I put lotion on before I knit and let it soak in. If there are any cracks I put a bandaid and Neosporin on it if it's in an area that yarn crosses or where needles put pressure. My lotion of choice is Lubriderm for very dry skin because it does soak in and isn't greasy.

JGM
04-11-2006, 12:57 PM
Here's a couple threads already started about the subject...

dry knitting hands.... (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/forum/viewtopic.php?p=104387&highlight=dry+hands#104387)

Dry cracked knitters' fingers (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/forum/viewtopic.php?t=7504&postdays=0&postorder=asc&highlight=dry+hands&start=0)

rebecca
04-11-2006, 01:20 PM
I must say that my favorite remedy is the paraffin spa that my sweet hubby surprised me with....works like a charm ;)

momwolf
04-11-2006, 02:23 PM
I use Udderly Smooth :heart: I had the same problem.My fabic store even sells this.But I usally get it at Walgreens cause it's cheaper.I now use it on my legs too.It was made to put on udders of cows http://bestsmileys.com/lol/4.gif My DH uses it too and his hands get really dry in the winter. Give it a try

sfavereau
04-11-2006, 02:28 PM
I use Udderly Smooth :heart: I had the same problem.My fabic store even sells this.But I usally get it at Walgreens cause it's cheaper.I now use it on my legs too.It was made to put on udders of cows http://bestsmileys.com/lol/4.gif My DH uses it too and his hands get really dry in the winter. Give it a try

My quilter friend introduced this to me and it really works! When we first moved to CO, I had the worst case of dry skin ever, but it seems to have gotten better and I don't need to constantly apply lotion. Udderly Smooth is great! Give it a try!

aylaanne
04-11-2006, 07:46 PM
I do nighttime vaseline treatments. I'm a nursing student, and I wash my hands obsessively. Sometimes I get such dry skin that it cracks and bleeds. It's horrible. I use lotion generously (my favorite is Avon Moisture Therapy with Oatmeal) but when that doesn't cut it, I'll take out the cotton lotion gloves (you can get them at most drugstores) and I slather my hands with vaseline, a nice hefty layer on my skin, then I put the gloves on. I've also heard that some people do this and put plastic wrap on their hands, or non-latex gloves. But the overnight treatment with the vaseline really works for me in a day, two at the most.

Good luck! :thumbsup:

Shandeh
04-11-2006, 08:03 PM
OK, I read all the other links about dry hands, but no one recommended what I've found. This is not for dry hands, but for sore spots on your hands. It's an adhesive "thimble" which is a small circle you can place wherever you have a sore spot on your hand. It works beautifully!

It sticks very well, and stays on until you remove it. I wouldn't recommend putting it on an open wound, but if you have a spot that always gets sore when you knit, it would be perfect.

I use it when I'm doing embroidery so I don't stab my finger over and over again. :doh:

http://www.pieceocake.com/Notions/thimbleit/thimbleit.html

Mienna
04-11-2006, 08:49 PM
I use Avons Care Deeply with Cocoa butter or Palmers cocoa butter since they don't have much by way of scent (I have eczema, and the fruity and flowery smells can dry your skin). They both work great.

Holly

JennyLeah
04-11-2006, 09:15 PM
I work in food service and spend a lot of time washing my hands and dishes (and then dunking dishes in a santizing solution that's even more drying!) and my skin, which never used to be dry, is cracked and all dry now too.

I love love L :heart: VE our parrafin spa. I use it twice a day - once right before I leave for work and then again when I get home from work. In between, I use Cocoa Butter or Shea Butter (whichever's cheapest the day I'm shopping) whenever I feel I need it. Or whenever the bottle's staring me in the face. I just like moisturizing, even if I don't necessarily need it.

For cracks, Vitamin E oil seems to do the trick. Just massage it into the cracks at least once a day and in a short while, they'll be gone. It's an amazing overall moisturizer too, but it comes with a hefty price tag if you're just buying the oil. (You can also buy the gelcaps of them and pierce it with a safety pin and squeeze the oil out. My local pharmacy has bottles of the oil, though, and I find that to be more economical.)

And of course, never forget the wisdom of soaking in a tub of oatmeal when you had the Chicken Pox or a really bad sunburn. An oatmeal handbath softens the skin like nothing else. Which always feels good. Sugar with olive or mineral oil works as a nice and gentle exfolliant too...

I think I've said more than enough to proove I'm a little bit obsessive about this, in any case... :walks away slowly:

callmesusan
04-12-2006, 12:12 AM
First, I would recommend that you stop using any anti-bacterial soap or anything on your hands. I work in the medical industry and found it to be very caustic to my hands. I even supply my own soap (anti-bacterial free)at my work area. Second, get some Curel!!!! You will be healed and baby soft in no time. :thumbsup:

Friskums
04-12-2006, 12:23 AM
get some Curel!!!! You will be healed and baby soft in no time. :thumbsup:

That's what I was going to suggest! I found it to be the best lotion as it doesn't leave a greasy feeling, but after rubbing it in, my hands feel 'wet' for a few minutes. Once they feel 'dry' again, I'm good to go and super smooth/soft. I :heart: :heart: :heart: Curél.

I don't recommend the "Dry Skin" version, because that one does leave my hands feeling greasy.



...I'm really picky about my hand lotion. :blush:

Denise in Michigan
04-12-2006, 09:13 AM
Sweet Thang--
To protect the cracked spot while it heals, try "Newskin Liquid Bandage", available at drugstores. Goes on clear (kind of like nailpolish), doesn't hamper movement, is very durable but easy to remove.

For the dryness and chapping, here's a recipe I've used for over 20 years. It's from my husband's Russian grandmother, and is a traditional folk remedy. (They know chapping in Russia!) Melt one part grated beeswax (light tan, rather than the white one) in about six parts extra virgin olive oil. Stir well, let cool till it starts to thicken, stir again, then pour into small glass jar with lid. Use a small amount at a time. Rub first into most-damaged or hardest-used areas, then over rest of hands. Use regularly for smooth, chap-free hands.

If you prefer a thicker salve, remelt and add a little more grated beeswax. For a thinner salve, remelt and add a little more oil. (This can be done in the microwave as well as on the stove.)

This takes only minutes to make, and the benefits are long-lasting!
--Denise

dustinac
04-12-2006, 09:16 AM
I had bad cracked hands before I knitted this winter was something else.. it would get so sore where I held my yarn... I also have problems with my feet and I use Avon Intestive lotion and Aveeno with oatmeal... this past winter when I got a bad crack I would put neousporin on it then cover it with a bandaid that helped heal it...

Holly
04-12-2006, 02:21 PM
During the winter, I have problems with the skin around my fingers cracking. I find that if I use liberal amts. of cuticle oil on my fingertips it helps a lot. (It comes in a small bottle with a brush and looks a lot like nail polish. I brush it over my nail and rub it in to my fingertips)

I love the home remedy! Where do you buy bees wax?

Holly
04-12-2006, 02:21 PM
During the winter, I have problems with the skin around my fingers cracking. I find that if I use liberal amts. of cuticle oil on my fingertips it helps a lot. (It comes in a small bottle with a brush and looks a lot like nail polish. I brush it over my nail and rub it in to my fingertips)

I love the home remedy! Where do you buy bees wax?

Denise in Michigan
04-12-2006, 02:47 PM
Holly--
Re: your query on where to buy beeswax. I buy mine at the Michigan State Fair every summer--it's reasonably priced, and a little goes a long way. I also have a number of beekeepers within easy driving distance--as a matter of fact, I just found out a couple of months ago that a beekeeper works with my brother-in-law at the local Home Depot!

I see you live in Illinois; I bet if you did an online search for "beekeepers Illinois" you'd find one not far from you who would be willing to sell the wax!

The reasons I use the tan beeswax rather than the white are because my hubby's grandma always used the tan, and because the tan still has a trace of the honey in it. (The honey is anti-bacterial, a humectant, and makes the finished product smell nice without being sticky.) You could try making the salve with the white beeswax pellets you can get at craft shops for candle making, but I have a hunch it wouldn't come out as well.
--Denise

hedgewick
04-12-2006, 02:48 PM
If you can find it "Bag Balm" is great. It was originally intended for cows but works well for people too.

mulene
04-13-2006, 05:12 PM
I visited the states last year and brought home with me a bunch of Burt's Bees stuff. Amongst them was the Burt's Bees hand care kit. The beeswax and banana hand creme and other items in the kit are fabulous. It comes with a pair of cute cotton gloves and at night I use them to cover my hands after slathering with the burts bees products.

During the day I use a product we have here in the UK called Oilatum. It's a tad expensive though so as an alternative I do what people with eczema do and use Aqueous creme.

I bought myself a paraffin bath last year too (from ebay!) and I have to say it is fabulous.

Solar oil is great for cuticles and fingertips but also plain almond oil is good. Another thing to do is ensure you exfoliate your hands once a week or so. A good way to do this is take some almond oil (or olive oil), a teaspoon full of rock salt or granulated sugar and rub your hands as if you were applying soap and washing your hands. Rinse off and use your favourite hand creme. Your hands will be smooth and feel softer.

Exfoliating the hands is as important as exfoliating your face, it helps slough off dead skin cells. If you go to your local mall and see those little carts in the middle selling things, I'll guarantee you see someone selling dead sea products. One of the big things they try to plug people to buy is the salts. They get you to wet your hands and then rub the salts over your hands, rinse and feel the difference. Don't fall for that - it's expensive and ordinary rock salt or granulated sugar does exactly the same thing!

orcoastknitter
04-13-2006, 07:21 PM
I have a job as a professional paper pusher. I absolutely hate dry hands. Since I started knitting my hands tend to get drier than normal. I am a lotion junkie (as well as a chapstick junkie). I found my favorite lotion is Dove Intensive Nourishing Lotion, Dry Skin. I use that along with Burt's Bees Lemon Butter Cuticle Creme (it smells like lemon Pledge) everyday. The Burt's Bees helps with my hangnails as well. Just my 2 cents worth.

Jodi

nicolethegeek
04-13-2006, 08:32 PM
My hand cream of choice is Keri Quick Absorbing. It really does soak in quick... less than a minute and I can easily grab anything, and no slippery feel. If a slippery coating is what you want, Glysomed works well. It reminds me of the feeling that I used to get when I'd use my mom's Avon Silicone Glove!