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Cristy
04-13-2006, 01:40 PM
okay, I using silver's sock tutorial to make socks for mom for mother's day...or at least I'm intending to. I knitting a few rounds last night but ended up taking it out b/c I'm having a real problem getting the stitch tight enough at the join and when I change from needle to needle. Does anyone have a suggestion? (Ingrid...I know you do...LOL)!

Regarding Silver's sock tutorial...can anyone tell me how long it took them the first time they went through it to make a sock? I know it'll vary from person to person but should I expect my first sock to take a week, a month, a few days??? I would probably devote a solid hour or two to it each day.

Jan in CA
04-13-2006, 01:47 PM
What I do for joins like that is this: After dividing the yarn onto each needle, I take one stitch at the join and move it to the other needle, then take one from that needle and move it over and onto the other needle. Then it's joined on it's own and I start knitting. It seems to keep that first join tight. Does that make sense to you?

It took me about 2-3 days to make the first sock although it would have gone faster had I knot spent so much time in here. :roflhard: :roflhard:

rebecca
04-13-2006, 01:48 PM
:D I didn't use Silver's tutorial when I 1st started with socks...don't know if she had done it yet ;) It took me a few days to do the 1st pair.
My suggestion would be that u give a slight tug on the 1st st on the needle & tug a bit more on the next 2. Also, when u go from one needle to next, have your dpns as close together as possible, this should help decrease the tension on the yarn @ this point.
Good luck, I know others will have other suggestions, too. It's like with all knitting...practice different tips until you find the one that works for you ;)

nicolethegeek
04-13-2006, 02:18 PM
I find that using 4 working dpns rather than the 3 that most patterns call for helps prevent there being as much tension on the yarn in between the needles. When casting on a sock, I will cast the stitches all on to one needle with an extra stitch. I will knit the first row off of that single needle to divide it on to my dpns. When I get to the last {extra} stitch, I will slip it on to the first needle {making sure that the stitches aren't twisted}, and knit {or purl} the first two stitches together to join. Any looseness at this beginning join I can tighten up by using the yarn tail when weaving in my ends later. I have also "adjusted" a pattern when possible so that the last stitch on a needle is a purl. The ladders don't seem to be as noticeable then.

CateKnits
04-13-2006, 02:51 PM
I did my first pair in a day and a half, but they were worsted weight. I used Silver's tutorial for them. The only suggestion I have on the gaps between needles is to pull the first stitch on each needle so that the needle is pulled toward and touches the previous needle. Hold it tight when you make the second stitch, too, or it'll just get loose again.

Cristy
04-13-2006, 05:05 PM
What I do for joins like that is this: After dividing the yarn onto each needle, I take one stitch at the join and move it to the other needle, then take one from that needle and move it over and onto the other needle. Then it's joined on it's own and I start knitting. It seems to keep that first join tight. Does that make sense to you?

It took a few hours and some serious brow furrowing but I do think I understand and it makes a whole heck of a lot of sense...thanks for the tip!

cheesiesmom
04-13-2006, 08:41 PM
I Just read on a sock knitting site that if you add 1 stitch to the total on the last needle and then at the beginning k2tog you have a tight join. I don't know if it works, but it makes sense to me. I'm trying it on the next circ project I do. (which should be soon as I doing baby socks right now. Love knitting sock!!)

Hildegard_von_Knittin
04-13-2006, 11:48 PM
I did a half sock with silver's tutorial before I got sucked into tubey. :rollseyes: My join stitch was loose too, and I just knitted it through the back loop. Makes it nice and tight (this might be considered taboo by sock purists).