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aylaanne
04-27-2006, 09:25 PM
I know there are nurses on this board. I'm just wondering....

how the hell did you manage to get through nursing school without setting yourself or someone else on fire? :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall:

knittingachiever
04-27-2006, 10:02 PM
You talk to friends like us. {{hug}}

I didn't go to nursing school, but many of my friends in the hospital did, and I have heard many a story. I have ENORMOUS respect for what you're doing, and I and all your KH buddies are here for you. :sunny:

Lisa1216
04-28-2006, 08:35 AM
I went to nursing school a year after high school, so i guess I was just still into the studying and learning. If I had to go back to school now, I would probably not survive. I remember my first day of clinical though. We were on a floor with med-surg type patients and we were just observing other staff nurses. I went into the room to watch her change a dressing and the next thing I know I had passed out. What a great way to start off! Made me wonder if I would ever make it through.

geekgolightly
04-28-2006, 08:48 AM
I know there are nurses on this board. I'm just wondering....

how the hell did you manage to get through nursing school without setting yourself or someone else on fire? :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall: :wall:

((((((hugs)))))))

some days i wanted to cry. some days i did cry. the clinicals were hardest for me because im so frightened of being judged and about one in four clinical instructors were sadists who wanted to flunk you out. i remember memorizing the pharmacokinetics of each drug i was going to give the next day. didnt matter, because i always did something that wasn't to their pleasure. :rollseyes:

what got me through was realizing that this was my only way to be able to do something that was worthwhile. are you already in clinicals? then you have two years or less! you can do two years of just about anything, even chinese water torture :rofling:

have you ever been to www.allnurses.com ? it's a great resource for support and information. i like watching the trends of nursing nationwide (and world wide!) and that's a great place to do it. im here if you need to vent. i feel for you!

Lisa1216
04-28-2006, 09:47 AM
about one in four clinical instructors were sadists who wanted to flunk you out.

We must have had some of the same instructors! :rofling:

Ronda
04-28-2006, 01:00 PM
some days i wanted to cry. some days i did cry. the clinicals were hardest for me because im so frightened of being judged and about one in four clinical instructors were sadists who wanted to flunk you out. i remember memorizing the pharmacokinetics of each drug i was going to give the next day. didnt matter, because i always did something that wasn't to their pleasure. :rollseyes:

I made it half way through nursing school before quitting, and this was one of the reasons. (The main reason was that I did not like the clinical aspect of nursing - I did not want to take care of patients. I LOVED theory, but I hated clinical.) I had one instructor who totally lived for the moment when she could humiliate a student. She got me the day I had to give a preop injection using more than one drug in the syringe. I had not passed out meds before at all, and I was unsure what to do. She let me have it in front of all the other students, the nurses, the doctors, and the patients. I vowed that day that I would finish the rotation and quit, which is exactly what I did. I don't regret it. I didn't want to be a nurse bad enough to put myself through that!

Jeremy
04-28-2006, 01:09 PM
I thought that I had made an enormous mistake going to nursing school. The only thing that kept me from transfering (again) to another subject was the adamant insistence of my then fiance (now wife) that I finally finish. It turns out what I really hated was nursing school and happily I really enjoyed nursing. Most nurses are really cool people. Unfortunately there are many nursing instructors who are simply a breed apart. On top of the usual stuff, I had a couple that were going through divorces and were taking their anger and general hatred of men out on me. But hang in there. :D

geekgolightly
04-28-2006, 02:24 PM
I thought that I had made an enormous mistake going to nursing school. The only thing that kept me from transfering (again) to another subject was the adamant insistence of my then fiance (now wife) that I finally finish. It turns out what I really hated was nursing school and happily I really enjoyed nursing. Most nurses are really cool people. Unfortunately there are many nursing instructors who are simply a breed apart. On top of the usual stuff, I had a couple that were going through divorces and were taking their anger and general hatred of men out on me. But hang in there. :D

jeremy it's awesome that you love your job. im working towards that reality myself.

i enjoy working towards saving a patient, but i dont enjoy being treated shabbily by administration, by doctors, by other nurses, by management and by patients and families. nurses are the scapegoat for all possible wrongs in a hospital setting. i have worked in a hospital wherein i was treated fairly well, and am currently in a hospital that does not treat nurses well. its also the best trauma hospital in town so im sticking it out until i get into SICU and get experience there. i have noticed that in ICU (i've floated there recently) you are treated very well. far better than floor/progressive care nurse are treated.

geekgolightly
04-28-2006, 02:25 PM
ps knitting helps the stress factor!! i knit during lunch, when i have time to sit and eat lunch, that is.

cindyln
04-28-2006, 04:44 PM
it was hard!! I went right after high school and stupidly got married in my last year of nursing school. Bad mistake. I would not do it again. Get married yes but not while still in school. The marriage has lasted but I almost flunked out my last year. Thank goodness I made it through school and love my job. I can't think of anything I would rather do more unless it was to be able to knit all day.

cindyln
04-28-2006, 04:47 PM
it was hard!! I went right after high school and stupidly got married in my last year of nursing school. Bad mistake. I would not do it again. Get married yes but not while still in school. The marriage has lasted but I almost flunked out my last year. Thank goodness I made it through school and love my job. I can't think of anything I would rather do more unless it was to be able to knit all day.

aylaanne
04-28-2006, 05:36 PM
Thanks, everybody! You're all so wonderful!

I'm nearly finished with school, I'm supposed to graduate in May (which is next month!) and I'm being held up by political and administrative [insert favorite swear word here]. It's boiling down to a situation where in order to continue, I have to admit to doing something I didn't do. For the third time this year. The last two times I just rolled over and did it, thinking if I just played along, then everything would be fine. But even though I played the game the last time, it seems that they want to make SURE that I'm completely cowed.

It's gotten to the point where I don't like my job anymore. I love taking care of patients, and being there for them, but I can't stomach this stuff. I just want to go, take care of patients, come home and knit and have babies and take care of my husband. I don't think I'm going to be allowed to.

And yes, knitting is a wonderful stress relief. So much so that I'm nearly finished with the shrug I started two weeks ago. My LYS owner said she was VERY impressed with it.

knittingachiever
04-28-2006, 06:06 PM
i enjoy working towards saving a patient, but i dont enjoy being treated shabbily by administration, by doctors, by other nurses, by management and by patients and families. nurses are the scapegoat for all possible wrongs in a hospital setting.
I hate to say it, but in a lot of cases you're right. Not always though! I recognized right away that nurses were always going to know tons about my patients and could save my a$$, and they have! I think that was the first thing I learned when I started clinical work in med school. I know that nurses work their butts off because they care about my patients as much as I do... I don't understand people in the hospital who don't get that. Now my goal is to model relationships of mutual respect with nurses and other health providers to my students! :thumbsup:

Jan in CA
04-28-2006, 06:07 PM
Isn't there ANYONE who will listen to you and hear your side of the story? That's nuts!

Hildegard_von_Knittin
04-28-2006, 07:39 PM
Isn't hug a nurse day next week sometime????

geekgolightly
04-29-2006, 12:20 AM
ayla are you being asked to admit something that could potentially harm a patient? anything at all that could jeopardize getting your license? im sorry you are ebing asked to lie in order to pass nursing school. i would not know how to tackle that one.

knittingachiever, there have been great doctors and nurses ive worked with and bless them! there was a gorup of neurosurgeons i worked with when i worked neuro who were absolute dreams (most of them in any case!) dr. camarata was brilliant, empathic, down to earth and a master surgeon. his patients' recovery rate was excellent, and i trusted him. i miss working with that group.

mostly i see both in nurses and doctors are those who are insecure (actual ability to perform seems unrelated to this condition) tend to belittle those around them. if administration isnt friendly to nurses, youll see more nurses that way. if doctors are working under a beastly attending, i see more docs mimic that behavior. i hope you plan on becoming an attending, because you are awesome and i know nurses everywhere would appreciate an attending like you.

hilde, i wasnt aware of nurse week? im gonna go look it up!

aylaanne
04-29-2006, 01:09 AM
I'm being asked to take all the blame for a situation where every party involved made an error. I was put in a clinical environment where the people there were not comfortable with correcting me when I made non-"clinical" mistakes. Like, when I spoke to a doctor regarding a patient that I wasn't assigned to. And when I made wisecracks with patients and other employees in awkward situations in order to reduce tension and build trust.

Apparently, doing these things was extremely out of line, and the nurse assigned to be my preceptor, instead of pulling me aside and speaking to me about it, said, "I'll see you next week" and then wrote an email to my teacher telling her she didn't want me back.

Now, in order to continue, I have to sign a contract that states that I was concerning the staff at my previous assignment, and highlights a passage in the student handbook about patient safety, saying that if I do even one thing that endangers patient safety I'm to be immediately removed from the patient situation and receive an F in the class. This contract will be given to my new preceptor and her manager, as well as distributed among the faculty at the nursing school and placed in my permanent record. And the only assurance I have that it won't affect my chances for future employment are faculty members looking at me with too-innocent faces assuring me that they don't share this kind of information with employers and that any employer won't take it as a sign that I'm a bad nurse. They're also assuring me that they're advocating for my needs as a student, which I don't buy at all.

I have had three nervous breakdowns in the course of my education. I am now 29 days away from graduation and I have 100 hours of clinical standing in my way. I do not yet have confirmation that, should I sign this abominable contract, I will be able to have a placement. I do have confirmation that if I don't sign it, I won't graduate. Period.

I think, whether I graduate or not, I'm going to let the nurses eat someone else. I'm tired of being nurse food. I'll go work in IT somewhere.

geekgolightly
04-29-2006, 07:05 AM
Honestly, I would sign that, and with that signature write what it is that I did "wrong." I think it's very strange that they want you to say you were endangering patient safety for making a joke and for speaking to the wrong doc (I do that on a daily basis). In signing this, I wouldn't use language that shows no remorse. Instead, I would use language that is very factual, and make sure that the school agrees with what is there. I would not just sign something that says I endangered patient safety, when it does not specify what I did. That's like signing a blank check.

If that is all you have to do, I would do it. It sounds like they are being sticklers and bizarre.

I do not think that this is something they would share with employers. Employers only want to know if you graduated and what date you graduated and if the school is accredited. If you have any instructor who can write a letter of recommendation, you're aces. How many hospitals are in the area?

geekgolightly
04-29-2006, 07:18 AM
As far as being nurse food - it's only the climate of the individual unit that will or will not tolerate that sort of behavior. I've been in enviornments wherein there was nothing but encouragement, and I have been in enviornments wherein literally shouting at the preceptee (me) by the preceptor, was tolerated by an inept nurse manager. I was run through Hades on that unit. I lasted three months. I had an excellent excuse for not going back; I had a baby and decided to stay at home for a while.

I don't know what type of nursing you are interested in, but try not to give up on the field just yet. Healthcare is a strange field. Poeple break down faster, even docs, but nurses and the managers of nurses who are nurses themselves are a strange breed. In a good enviornment wherein we are respected for what we do, we shine. In a poor enviornment wherein we are expected to go over staffing grid (or when we don't even HAVE a staffing grid, like the position I am in now) there can be a great deal of tension. I believe it's only because everyone is overwhelmed and we all feel badly about not being able to give proper patient care. I cried last weekend. Not the hallmark sign of a healthy enviornment, but I have a goal here. And I know it can be much better.

I guess the picture I pain isn't too bright, but when everything flows well, and I am able to catch a set of clinical signs and avert disaster, it's a feeling of elation. Totally totally wonderful.

Anya
04-29-2006, 07:23 AM
Hugs, Ayla. I have no advice, but I'm hoping that this will all work out for you before graduation.

feministmama
04-29-2006, 12:21 PM
Nurses Rule!!! I wanted to be a nurse when I was a kid. I thought it was a job where you paid to love people all day. :shock:

Jan in CA
04-29-2006, 01:46 PM
I hope you stick with it, too! What GGL said make sa lot of sense and having read it I have to agree. We NEED good nurses!

I wanted to be a nurse, too. Somehow my parents were of the mind that I'd do better in cosmetology school. :rollseyes: I did and only ended up working for about 3 yrs.

geekgolightly
04-29-2006, 03:43 PM
Nurses Rule!!! I wanted to be a nurse when I was a kid. I thought it was a job where you paid to love people all day. :shock:

that's the best part of being a nurse IMHO. some of them are hard to love, like the sickle cellers who are used to the system and are drug seeking, but i so love them, too. imagine having to be in and out of the hospital from the time youre an infant with PAIN PAIN PAIN PAIN. i remember that when they treat me like crap and throw specimen cups at my head and try to control each and every move i make. they are the most challenging patient population, with the least amount of personal satisfaction, and they are the ones who need you and your love the most.

i do recommend this career despite it's drawbacks. anyone who has thought about it, go for it! if you want to PM me, feel free. i love to talk about nursing.

aylaanne
04-29-2006, 04:45 PM
i remember that when they treat me like crap and throw specimen cups at my head and try to control each and every move i make. they are the most challenging patient population, with the least amount of personal satisfaction, and they are the ones who need you and your love the most.
My favorite patients are always the crankiest. There have been many times when, with just a little TLC, I've been able to mollify a patient who has frustrated everyone else. I always remember that in a hospital, everything has been taken away from these patients, their clothes, their schedule, their dignity. And I try to give a little of that control back to them. I encourage all my patients to tell me what to do and be demanding and to refuse care that they aren't comfortable with.

And I have nurses and doctors mad with me all the time for doing that, too. It screws them up when patients refuse to comply with treatment recommendations. But you know what? The body belongs to the patient, and they get to do whatever they want with it. And instinct is instinct. You can't learn it. You can learn things to enhance it, but when your gut says something is wrong, then something is wrong.

I don't believe any patient is med-seeking, at least the way some people mean it. I prefer treatment-seeking. If a patient is asking for medication over and over and over, that means they have a need that is not being met, that needs treatment. I hate the words med-seeking.

aylaanne
04-29-2006, 04:45 PM
i remember that when they treat me like crap and throw specimen cups at my head and try to control each and every move i make. they are the most challenging patient population, with the least amount of personal satisfaction, and they are the ones who need you and your love the most.
My favorite patients are always the crankiest. There have been many times when, with just a little TLC, I've been able to mollify a patient who has frustrated everyone else. I always remember that in a hospital, everything has been taken away from these patients, their clothes, their schedule, their dignity. And I try to give a little of that control back to them. I encourage all my patients to tell me what to do and be demanding and to refuse care that they aren't comfortable with.

And I have nurses and doctors mad with me all the time for doing that, too. It screws them up when patients refuse to comply with treatment recommendations. But you know what? The body belongs to the patient, and they get to do whatever they want with it. And instinct is instinct. You can't learn it. You can learn things to enhance it, but when your gut says something is wrong, then something is wrong.

I don't believe any patient is med-seeking, at least the way some people mean it. I prefer treatment-seeking. If a patient is asking for medication over and over and over, that means they have a need that is not being met, that needs treatment. I hate the words med-seeking.

cindyln
04-29-2006, 05:30 PM
May 6- 12 is Nurse's Week. Give all your favorite nurses something soft,like yarn. :XX: