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brendajos
07-06-2006, 03:56 PM
okay...am i the only one who is bothered by certain words? i am not talking about the "naughty" ones (though i do find some of them quite satisfying sometimes) ...i am talking about made up words and just words that are generally bothersome to me. Like butt...i hate the word butt. i use it but i still don't like it. (i can't explain it)

the one that got me starting this post though is the girl who sits over <~~~there~~~ (who i fear Dustina gets to hear about too much :rofling: ) uses the word "trial" as a verb and it maketh me crazy!

she just said "go ahead and trial that out this week..." and she uses it ALLLL the time.

along with the phrase "Oh Dang!"

that phrase never use to bother me...really....i swear.

i am fairly certain I will be able to come up with a lengthy list...lol...am i alone in this?

Jan in CA
07-06-2006, 03:59 PM
Merf. :lol:

Sometimes it takes me a minute to figure out what the mean, but it doesn't really bother me. ;)

Jenelle
07-06-2006, 04:05 PM
It isn't words that bother me, it's when the words are not spelled right. I can understand if you misspell something on accident, but when you replace 'you' with a 'u' that irritates me... :mad:

brownishcoat
07-06-2006, 04:15 PM
The tech editor in me always wants to correct apostrophe usage. It's "you're" for you are, "it's" for it is, etc.

Friskums
07-06-2006, 04:21 PM
I used to talk like that. u, 2, b, etc... :oops:

When I first got online and thought it was cool. :rollseyes:
It really does irritate me now though.

That, and when people -know- they are poor spellers and yet make no effort to use a spell checker or in some way at least -try- to spell most things right. That drives me nuts. :rollseyes:

iza
07-06-2006, 04:31 PM
Bad pronunciation bugs me sometimes, however I'm a native french speaker so I'm highly guilty of that myself :rofling: But George W. Bush's "nukelar"... CAN'T STAND IT.

Speaking of french, people using "Ohlala" for anything relating to french irritates me for some reason. Or "sacrebleu". I think it's because it's so old-style-stereotyped Paris french to me...

Dilly
07-06-2006, 05:02 PM
There are a lot of people where I work who say "I seen" instead of "I saw". Also, I know people who say "acrosst" instead of "across". Where did the 't' come from???

Run on sentences also bother me a lot.

That's all I can think of for now. There are lots of other things that bug me too. I'm not a perfect speller, nor am I a grammar whiz, but I try to do my best, and I pay attention to what I am writing and saying.

knitwit
07-06-2006, 05:05 PM
The one that drives me bonkers is when you thank someone for something and the person replies "You Welcome" Instead of "You're Welcome".

I also worked with someone who used to say the word precident incorrectly- it would come out as President. She would say, "well we don't want to set a President."

Then there's Used to Could. "well, we used to could be able to do that"

And my favorite H and R. As in, we really need talk to someone in H and R about benefits. Kinda sounded like someone saying H & R Block .....


:rollseyes:

brendajos
07-06-2006, 05:14 PM
ooooooh pacific instead of specific!

irregardless....

anyways (My friends use that one on purpose because they know it bugs me!)


(i have no idea what Merf means!) :thinking:

shellebelle216
07-06-2006, 05:33 PM
This is too funny. My poor husband is guilty of most of these! He adds the T on the end of several words and spells so horribly that spell check is confused. One thing that bothers me the most is irregardless. It is so hard not to correct people when they use it.

MaggieL
07-06-2006, 05:39 PM
fur instead of for
tin instead of ten
git instead of get
I got instead of I have
uhUHuh instead of I don't know

sfavereau
07-06-2006, 05:49 PM
I hate "hisself" instead of himself. My old boss used to say that... "He can do it hisself." ARGH!

The only time I use u instead of you or ne1 instead of anyone is when I'm playing World of Warcraft and typing can mean life or death in the game. :roflhard:

feministmama
07-06-2006, 05:51 PM
When folks pronounce the "th" on the end of height. It's not heighth it's height. No one ever says weight like weighth. EEEwww that irks me.

Jan in CA
07-06-2006, 05:54 PM
(i have no idea what Merf means!) :thinking:

It was in Cate's blog I think...she made it up so was just amusing myself. Apparently it is used like Homer's DOH! or UGH! :lol:

Some words are regional and while they sound odd to us they aren't to them.

ladyindica2000
07-06-2006, 05:55 PM
I am right there with you. I was in a meeting yesterday with a dept manager who said "irregardless". Gah. I hate it when people who get paid more than me use words like that. I just seems so wrong. I also hate prolly, libary, and my personal favorite "ain't".

Friskums
07-06-2006, 06:00 PM
"Perscription" (sounds like that anyway) instead of "Subscription".
Every day someone calls in and says "I want to cancel my perscription.


Funny how something that never would have crossed your mind before can irk you when heard on a daily basis.


And yeah...I'll type "shorthand" when I'm playing a game and the pressure is on. ;)

Vendie
07-06-2006, 06:03 PM
I was at the airport a couple of months ago and these two women were sitting near me and they were chatting away. One of the women would end every other statement with "PS - " and then say something else. Drove me up the friggin wall! I wanted to say "PS - shut the %^&# up".

Angelia
07-06-2006, 06:06 PM
I loathe "due to the fact that." Just say "because"!!

Friskums
07-06-2006, 06:16 PM
I :heart: "therefore". :D

Hildegard_von_Knittin
07-06-2006, 06:54 PM
It took me months to convince my SIL that the verb form of conversation is "converse" not "conversate"

Dilly
07-06-2006, 07:08 PM
I have thought of a couple of more words or things that bother me:

The use of the word deplane instead of disembark. Deplane is apparently a word that can now be found on www.dictionary.com, but I believe it was recently added as a word. Disembark is the correct or traditional term.

The other thing that bothers me is a 'hot water heater'. If the water is hot, why are you heating it??? It's just a 'water heater'. ;)

nefferbea
07-06-2006, 07:22 PM
I cringe whenever someone uses "I" instead of "me" and vice versa. For example, "She gave it to Rod and I." It should be me, because you'd say, "She gave it to me". aaarrgh!

Then, my FIL says don't instead of doesn't, like in "He don't like it." Drives me up the wall!

I think this is from having an elementary teacher for a mother!

I've never heard "conversate". That's pretty funny!

krnaslterp
07-06-2006, 08:19 PM
I am an interpreter and I can't stand it when people say "interpretator" and "interpretate!"

kellyjo32
07-06-2006, 08:21 PM
I'm finding this so amusing because we have one girl at work who constantly uses words incorrectly. Last week she sent an email that said she was going home because of her "consist cough". What? Do you mean, constant, consistent, persistent? Yikes, spell check can't even catch that!

But I will say, the ones that get to me the most are...
pacific vs. specific
cent instead of cents, if there is more than one cent, it's cents, i think that rapper guy 50 cent started this crap
won't instead of wasn't (this one took me forever to figure out, but I know someone who says it ALL the time!) ex. She won't home last night. Yuck!

But I also must confess, I am guilty of combining words sometimes, my arm = marm, etc. and after recently sitting through an orienteering course, somehow I picked up "orientate" whoops...it's just orient. DH nicely corrected me one day!

Angelia
07-06-2006, 08:25 PM
In HS, a friend of mine worked summers at her father's office (he was a GP). One day, she overheard two women talking about a friend of theirs. One of the women described the friend's declining health and sighed, "oh, she's lost so much weight; she looks so emancipated!" :rofling:

BinkyKat
07-06-2006, 09:10 PM
:thinking:
Here's MY list...some have been mentioned, but I'll repeat...
Irregardless
Disorientated/Orientated
I seen
Like (when overused by the office skank)
She goes, he goes, I went - instead of She said or I said (over used by aforementioned skank)
Unthaw for Defrost
Larnix for Larynx (i got that from my speech path major days in college)
Xmas, Thanx and Bday (i use it in a pinch, but it still bugs me)
"Will you borrow me..." instead of lend

And don't ever AX me a question or said axe will end up in your skull!!!
You would be amazed at the number of so called professionals and government employees I have talked to as credit card customers of mine that say AX... I just want to crawl through the phone and beat them with it.
:wall:
I do relax my spelling when online and such, and working in the call center and notating accounts, it doesn't matter if we use caps when needed as the system turns it all into caps anyway. In some cases, spelling and punctuation is skipped to save space on a space with minimum allowed characters. This makes me lazy and I have to triple check myself when typing something important.

DH says Punkin' for pumpkin and ValentiMes day for ValentiNes... but i think that's adorable! :inlove:

I don't correct others that use bad grammar or english, but I will say something that doesn't sound right and stop myself and correct myself laughingly. I have an aunt that was my best friend growing up... like a cool mom... and I wrote to her a lot growing up. Then one day, she showed me how she had kept all my letters and told me that not only did she share my "secrets" like crushes and such with my mom so she would be "left out" but that she also had marked the hell out of them with red pencil. :rollseyes: Our relationship changed in a big way from that point on

Hildegard_von_Knittin
07-06-2006, 09:11 PM
But I also must confess, I am guilty of combining words sometimes, my arm = marm, etc.

Oh yeah, DH and I invented the word "Mundies" :oops:

mintdee
07-06-2006, 09:56 PM
:roflhard: That is an awesome word Hilde :P

One word that drives me insane is "sumpum" for something. Sadly that is only because I said it for so many years that now that I finally stopped myself from saying it that way it drives me nuts when others say it.

That and "moms" This kid asked my son where I was and he said it like"Hey where your moms at?" Nick promptly told him that he only has 1 mom. (YES! Something is getting through to him! :roflhard: ) Same kid also noticed that Nick has two silver caps right on his front teeth (fell and chipped them both when he was 2) and got all excited "DANG! Your moms let you get silver fronts?!" :rollseyes:

Jackie M.
07-06-2006, 10:08 PM
Working in a library, I hate people coming in and saying li-berry. "This is a nice little li-berry". Even one of our own employees answers the phone as the "public liberry".

gardenmommy
07-06-2006, 10:25 PM
I come across this frequently because I work as a medical transcriptionist, but can I think of any good examples of doctors making up words now? Of course not! And it would be medically related anyway, like the radiologist who insisted a term was parahilar, when really it's perihilar....but I digress.

One thing that bugs me is "at this point in time" How about NOW?

Hildegard_von_Knittin
07-06-2006, 10:28 PM
:mad: "baby daddy"

orcoastknitter
07-06-2006, 11:15 PM
I work in a small office with three other women. Some days I just want to scream at them for the way they pronouce the following words:

Warshington - Washington
Buffet - Buffit
Batteries - Baddries (say it real fast)

One of my coworkers does the those funky hand gestures. For example the telephone gesture with her thumb and pinky. It drives me crazy.

:wall:

EssenceRose
07-06-2006, 11:22 PM
It drives me nuts!! Especially over here in NZ. You would not BELIEVE how many young teenage kids think it's "cool" to say certain things. For example, I hear "fink" instead of think so many times a day. Also, they say "somethinK" instead of something a lot here. It drives me up the wall when I hear it.

Some of the younger ones have a certain lingo and accent they use and I just cannot stand it. It makes them sound lazy and the worst part is they know it does. They think it's cool to talk that way.

It's one of my biggest pet peeves. I have to bite my tongue a LOT to keep from correcting people. :oops:

Jenelle
07-06-2006, 11:32 PM
Ohh, others that bothers me are "ain't" and "arn't".

My mother used to say, "Ain't ain't a word and you ain't going to say it."

Nikki
07-06-2006, 11:33 PM
FOR FREE!!!!

Something is either free or it's not.
Nikki

BinkyKat
07-06-2006, 11:48 PM
Ohh, others that bothers me are "ain't" and "arn't".

My mother used to say, "Ain't ain't a word and you ain't going to say it."

I had a classmate in highschool that debated this topic with our English teacher so she challenged him to research "ain't" and write a paper. So he did!
I guess the jist (sp?) of it was that "ain't" is a slang version of "are not" (aren't).



He got an A
:roflhard:

brendajos
07-07-2006, 12:12 AM
one of those phrases that has always made me a little crazy is "peace protesters"....really? are people really protesting peace? Yes i know what they mean but it still bothers me.

And willy nilly use of the word "Literally."
"I literally fell out of my chair laughing."
"I literally laughed my butt off" (really if you can do that......)

It literally makes me crazy! :rofling:

NinaT
07-07-2006, 04:33 AM
OK here's mine... Teachers (and everyone else) ending sentences with "at". "Where is it at?" "Where are you at?" Why not "Where is it?" or "Where are you?" I hate having people who are supposed to be teaching my children using English incorrectly. Luckily, they hear it correctly at home.

tab
07-07-2006, 07:02 AM
Most of my pet peeves have already been mentioned, which is reassuring - all hope is not lost. ;)
"Hence" bothers me. It's actually a perfectly lovely word, but it is not a synonym for "because" or "since". It really isn't. People using it that way drive me crazy.

brendajos
07-07-2006, 07:31 AM
OK here's mine... Teachers (and everyone else) ending sentences with "at". "Where is it at?" "Where are you at?" Why not "Where is it?" or "Where are you?" I hate having people who are supposed to be teaching my children using English incorrectly. Luckily, they hear it correctly at home.

lol that's totally a Midwest thing too! it drives me crazy too because i end sentences with prepositions all the time and i KNOW it is wrong. I stop and correct myself in mid-thought when i am speaking with the person looking at me like i am crazy. why do they look at me like that? because they are from the Midwest too and think what i just said was perfectly fine! :rofling:

SandraEllen
07-07-2006, 07:56 AM
This topic makes me laugh. I'm get so irritated at a lot of things people have said.

ESPECIALLY:
there, their, they're
two, too, to
our, hour, are

But another thing a lot of people do in the midwest is say Kmarts, Walmarts, Fords, Meijers. It really used to irk me.
and so to get over it, I've started calling Target "Targets" as a way of cracking fun at people who talk like that.

KellyK
07-07-2006, 08:23 AM
one of those phrases that has always made me a little crazy is "peace protesters"....really? are people really protesting peace?

:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

It drives me crazy too because i end sentences with prepositions all the time and i KNOW it is wrong.
That is a habit up with which you should not put!! :fingerwag:

Orientate makes me CRINGE

And, "use to" instead of "used to" :?

The WORST, however, was a woman who used to tell me she had to get off the phone so she could "TAKE her kids a bath". GAH!!! :mad: Are you going to TAKE it from someone else so you can GIVE it to them????

JLC
07-07-2006, 08:33 AM
Ooh, good thread. I almost died yesterday when my boss was on the phone trying to get parts for a nurse call system and he told the vendor that our system is "busted". He also says flustrating instead of frustrating. Ain't is another big one, as well as "I seen this report somewhere". Grr. I was in our purchasing department one day and the manager was talked to a sales person and she said "No, we don't use them things no more".

On the other hand, one of our other guys, who is in his mid 60's, makes up his own words. We joke that we're going to make a dictionary out of his words. He honestly doesn't know that he's saying words wrong so it makes it even funnier. Example:
When he dies, he will be "cremanated"
If you take too many medications, it will begin to affect your "maroon" system (immune!). There are so many more, but I don't have time to write them right now.

MrsBear87
07-07-2006, 08:35 AM
"Free Gift" - Isn't that what makes it a gift...it is FREE??

I also hate 'cute' spellings - donut, for example - or kwik for quick.

And "have a nice day." Is that an order?

brownishcoat
07-07-2006, 08:50 AM
He also says flustrating instead of frustrating.

OMG!!! My mom says "flustrated" ALL the time!

I'm always going, "You're either 'flustered' or 'frustrated', not 'flustrated'!"

I hate the "cute" spellings, too. Well, except for "Eat More Chikin". ;)

tab
07-07-2006, 08:54 AM
Oh, I forgot the one that drives my dad insane. There's a poster in my little brother's classroom that instructs the students to "bring your work to the teacher's desk". Thing is, you can only bring your work there if you're already at the teacher's desk - otherwise, you're taking it there. Bring = to you, take = away from you. You take your child to the doctor's office. When you're there, you tell the doctor that you'll bring him back next Tuesday, and then you take him home. Bring/take have become pretty much synonymous in common use, though. Ah, the joys of having a grammar enthusiast as a dad.

feministmama
07-07-2006, 09:08 AM
My 10 year old son says entelope instead of envelope. I think that's kinda cute. He used to say hopsital instead of hospital and I think all kids say pasghetti instead of spaghetti. Kids making up words is so much cuter than adults. :lol:

brownishcoat
07-07-2006, 09:18 AM
Yes, "pan-a-cakes" has become our standard word for "pancakes".

brendajos
07-07-2006, 09:31 AM
I like it when I see "Excellent written and verbal skills" on a job listing. I almost feel like they are challenging me to tell them that those are the same thing and what they really mean are "oral and written skills."

I haven't challenged them yet! ;)

mornnen
07-07-2006, 09:33 AM
My goodness, this is a fun topic--I teach students at the college level and I am occasionally depressed by the abuse of the English language that I hear and read.

But the pronunciation of a word that drives me nuts is the word "orange" by my uncle -- my dad's brother. Instead of orange he says something very close to "oyjn" (and no, I am not leaving out a vowel).

And although a native of MN, I lived in Louisiana for 3 years, and in addition to the "used to could" I also heard the "might could" and "fixin' to."

Julie

CarmenIbanez
07-07-2006, 10:51 AM
Let's see some that I hear everyday. Munipulate, instead of manipulate. Great, now I can't think of any more.

HollyP
07-07-2006, 11:04 AM
The principal at the a local highschool uses on tomorrow. As in the sca will meet on tomorrow. I used to substitute teach and everytime I heard him say it I wanted so badly to correct him.

Another is- n em. My Sil's mother says Ivannem went huntin last week. Meaning Ivan and his friends(them). I think it is a country thing but it still gets me.

Huh drives me crazy. If you didn't hear what I said say excuse me, pardon, or could you please repeat that.

gardenmommy
07-07-2006, 11:23 AM
http://www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html#errors

This is a fun site you can use if you need to correct someone's grammar or word usage. ;)

Friskums
07-07-2006, 11:30 AM
Using "Ipod" as a general term for an MP3 player.

Saying "I just went out and bought this MP3 and now I can't get my music on it"...
I've only heard this working in tech support, but it quickly got on my nerves and now it makes me cringe when I hear it.

CarmenIbanez
07-07-2006, 12:08 PM
"I've been knowing him now for 15 years"

Kirochka
07-07-2006, 12:23 PM
I don't mind things that are the result of regionalisms or accents, but certain linguistic things drive me nuts... prepare to flame me... but "we are trying to get pregnant" makes me want to scream... until it's a couple's option for the guy to carry a fetus around for 9 months and then push out a baby, it will never stop making me crazy. I know it's supposed to be inclusive, but I can't help it... :hiding: I prefer "we're trying to have a baby" - both parents do have a baby, but only one can be pregnant...

nicolethegeek
07-07-2006, 03:22 PM
I'm guilty of making up a few words {mebbe for maybe is my main one}, but yet incorrect spellings and word usages drive me nuts too. I was a proofreader at Jostens {school yearbooks -- yearbook, one word unless in the UK} for years, and I saw first hand how bad high schoolers {high school, two words} were with not only grammar, but spelling {you used a computer to type this thing out, learn how to use the d*&^ spell check!!!}. You congraTulate the graDuates, not offer congraDulations. Spelling is a big thing to me, and even though I rarely use my spell check, I usually do proofread before hitting the send or submit button. While in IRC or using IM, my grammar, spelling, punctuation and such go out the window. I tend to use some chat acronyms, but only for long strings of words, not shortening a word. For example, I will use KWIM, but not l8r.

Kirochka
07-07-2006, 03:25 PM
I thought of another one. "Very unique." A thing is either unique or it isn't... there aren't degrees of uniqueness! Grrrrr! :evil:

Jackie M.
07-07-2006, 04:38 PM
This topic makes me laugh. I'm get so irritated at a lot of things people have said.

But another thing a lot of people do in the midwest is say Kmarts, Walmarts, Fords, Meijers. It really used to irk me.
and so to get over it, I've started calling Target "Targets" as a way of cracking fun at people who talk like that.


oooouuu...I hate that one too! As big as the letters are, can't people see that there are not "s's" in Wal-mart or K-mart???? I want to ask them if they see an s and where is it!

jamadian75
07-07-2006, 06:59 PM
Things like "tiny little" or "big huge" were forbidden in my house growing up.

Starting multiple senteces in a conversation with "Basically..." (and worse, pronouncing it /bay' sicklee/

"Well, me personally...." (as opposed to who???)

(LOVE this topic.)

Dilly
07-07-2006, 07:21 PM
I hate people that end a sentence with 'with'. "I'm going to bring it with." Somebody said that to me once, and I just stared at her confused. I was waiting for her to finish her sentence, but she never did. It just sounds so wrong to me!

This is a great topic. There are so many other things that bother me, but I can't think of them all right now.

Has anybody else read "Eats, Shoots & Leaves"? I loved that book! I'm not all that great at punctuation, but that book did touch on many of the things we are mentioning here.

brendajos
07-07-2006, 07:45 PM
Things like "tiny little" or "big huge" were forbidden in my house growing up.

Starting multiple senteces in a conversation with "Basically..." (and worse, pronouncing it /bay' sicklee/

"Well, me personally...." (as opposed to who???)

(LOVE this topic.)

wait how do you pronounce basically?

beckyrhae
07-07-2006, 08:01 PM
My biggest peeve...

Using "ON" and "OFF" instead of "IN" and "OUT"

Its very popular here in West Texas... "Get off the car and go inside!" Makes my skin crawl every time!

brendajos
07-07-2006, 08:06 PM
okay i don't understand that at all.

The girls at the office when i was in louisiana were talking about going to the grocery store and i actually heard one of them say "can you carry me to the store?"



i do understand what they mean now but i turned and looked with the most puzzled expression at the time because the other woman willingly agreed to this arrangement! :??

BinkyKat
07-07-2006, 08:18 PM
I'm always going, "You're either 'flustered' or 'frustrated', not 'flustrated'!"


Where did you go???

LOL :roflhard:

Around here you hear a lot of "putting gas on" for filling your tank. We also hear a lot of "Oh for...." when describing things such as: oh for dumb, oh for cute, etc.
My aunt says Pooporay for potpourri and Croutch for crotch. She also injects the word "whatchacallit" like many people use umm or uhhh. My mom does that with "tada tada" (doing a magic trick Ma?). She hated it when we said, pointing, "look at those, there"

Another TOTAL peeve is... "know whut I'm sayin'?"
AAAAAAAARRRRRGGGGGHHHHHH!

brendajos
07-07-2006, 08:26 PM
how about prostrate and prostate... :shock:

BinkyKat
07-07-2006, 08:29 PM
how about prostrate and prostate... :shock:

Gawd, ANOTHER hate of mine!!!!! :doh:

EssenceRose
07-07-2006, 11:14 PM
gardenmommy, thank you for that web site!!

tab
07-07-2006, 11:31 PM
Trying not to touch my numerous mosquito bites, another linguistic pet peeve presented itself to me. I scratch my mosquito bites. I don't "itch" them. Itching is what they do. They itch, I scratch. I don't itch them, and they don't scratch me. It all works.

I'm confused alongside brendajos, though. How do you pronounce "basically", jamadian75?

JGM
07-08-2006, 12:14 AM
Ok, I have one to contribute...I hate it when people misuse adverbs such as "Don't take it personal" instead of "Don't take it personally". I've been noticing that a lot lately.

My parents ad S's to their shopping places too :) But I'm over that.

My aunt always says "Yous guys"

jamadian75
07-08-2006, 12:47 AM
wait how do you pronounce basically?

:roflhard: sorry

When I do use it, I pronounce the 2nd "a" - baysicAlly; most often when people are interjecting it as a segue, they skip that. Mom was anal about enunciation too. :rollseyes:

zazzu
07-08-2006, 12:52 AM
Starting multiple senteces in a conversation with "Basically..."

OH! YES!!!! "Basically" is the single most overused word in the English language. My mother has been complaining about its overuse for 25 years, seriously. People always start a sentence with "Basically" when they have no idea what they're talking about.

Anyway....

One thing I really, really hate is when people say "Oh, I could care less..." Um, NO! You mean you couldn't care less. If you could care less, that means that you actually do care a certain amount. :rollseyes:

And there needs to be a grade school course on the difference between "your" and "you're", apparently.

This is such a great topic. Makes me feel less strange for getting annoyed at this stuff. Even though these things irk me, I don't go around correcting people's grammar and word usage. That would be REALLY annoying :D

jamadian75
07-08-2006, 01:01 AM
One thing I really, really hate is when people say "Oh, I could care less..." Um, NO! You mean you couldn't care less. If you could care less, that means that you actually do care a certain amount. :rollseyes:


ooooooooooo...Good one.

How about interchanging nauseous and nauseated? I always think twice before using either one.

brendajos
07-08-2006, 01:21 AM
wait how do you pronounce basically?

:roflhard: sorry

When I do use it, I pronounce the 2nd "a" - baysicAlly; most often when people are interjecting it as a segue, they skip that. Mom was anal about enunciation too. :rollseyes:

okay i have been sitting around ever since you posted saying basically to see how i say it, and i have been making other people too. I would be really grating on your nerves because i do say it without the A. (you should have seen us at the p/t job...repeating it over and over trying to figure out the different ways to say it.... :rofling: )


I do appreciate a person who enunciates well though.....even more when the PRONUNCIATE (ack! :shock: )

Hildegard_von_Knittin
07-08-2006, 01:29 AM
Oh here's one that I get ALLL kinds of crap for (for which I get all kind of crap).... I say "play bowling" as in "Let's go play bowling", instead of "Let's go bowl." It drives DH batty, and all my friends tease me about it. That's how I've *always* said it though!!!

brendajos
07-08-2006, 01:57 AM
is that like Rosie O'Donnell's old joke about Taking the pot? :rofling:

Jan in CA
07-08-2006, 02:02 AM
I pronouce it basicly..no a sound. What is correct?

brendajos
07-08-2006, 02:04 AM
well here's what Mr. Webster says....

Pronunciation: 'bA-si-k(&-)lE also -zi-


(okay i seriously need to go back to bed because this thread has me in a total fit of giggles)

Yarnlady
07-08-2006, 08:36 AM
The one that's been making me nuts recently is reading someone casted on 30 stitches. :XX:

Kirochka
07-08-2006, 09:58 AM
Just read in the local newspaper that there's a Civil War re-enactment happening this weekend (largest in Illinois, they claim, incidentally) that's going to feature, among other things, "periodic music."

I suspect they don't mean "periodic"! :rollseyes: :wall: :wall: Although of course it may well be that, too.

My other pet peeve (that comes to mind at the moment) is dangling participles... like this, which according to Wikipedia is from the 1918 Elements of Style: "Being in a dilapidated condition, I was able to buy the house very cheap." Drives me insane... and it's incredibly common. ETA: I remember laughing out loud during standardized tests in high school when they included dangling participles. No, I was not one of the popular kids in high school...

I've started allowing myself to use the word "hopefully" (incorrectly) recently, in the interest of being less rigid about these things. But I notice it each time I say it! :rollseyes:

Chel
07-08-2006, 10:27 AM
I could write a whole list of these. The fun part is when you finally get irked enough to point out their errors and they get angry with you.

Recently the local mispronunciation of Washington as Warshington has been driving me to distraction. Also here people tend to say "I'm going to take and go to the store". Take WHAT?

Still, I must admit I am guilty of constantly mispronouncing a word. I try to correct myself, but often miss it. Antenna. I pronounce it an-TAN-ah. :oops:

Jan in CA
07-08-2006, 10:27 AM
Gah! I don't know what a participle is and I probably dangle them all the time. :lol:

I hope all this stuff in this thread doesn't make people afraid or ashamed to post because I know a lot of us are guilty of this stuff. :rollseyes:

Kirochka
07-08-2006, 10:34 AM
I certainly don't intend to make anyone self-conscious about posting! I hope I haven't. I've just always been an aspiring grammar goddess (read: nerd).

A participle is an -ing form of a verb (I'm sure there's a more technical and correct description than that...). In the example I posted, "Being in a dilapidated condition, I was able to buy the house very cheap," the partipcle phrase at the beginning applies to the noun that starts the next clause... i.e. the word "I." So actually it's rephrasable as "Since I was in a dilapidated condition, I was able to buy the house very cheap."

I know, it's fussy of me, but it's a pet peeve, what can I do?... ;)

Indygirl
07-08-2006, 10:45 AM
Gah! I don't know what a participle is and I probably dangle them all the time. :lol:

I hope all this stuff in this thread doesn't make people afraid or ashamed to post because I know a lot of us are guilty of this stuff. :rollseyes:

This very well could happen. I thought this was a fun place to hang out.

Jan in CA
07-08-2006, 10:47 AM
I wasn't referring to your comment(s) specifically, Karen. The original intent of this thread was just a few word annoyances, but it's become more than that. My concern is that we have people from all over the world and english is not always their first language. Regional dialects also are at issue. Some people seem to be driven mad by some errors in grammar and spelling and I'd hate for anyone who has less education or is from another part of the country (or world) not to post because of it. I may be overthinking it, but that's just me. ;)

Kirochka
07-08-2006, 11:00 AM
Well, as I mentioned, my take has always been that it's not regionalisms or accents that bug me... I love regional differences, myself (when we go to Alabama, for instance, I just love hearing people talk about "carrying people to singings" or "mashing the button on the remote" or such). And I'd never correct anyone's writing (unless it's someone I know will be amused by it, like Angelia! ;) ). And as someone who's worked hard to study other languages, I'm always in awe at anyone who's not a native speaker of English writing away in English... no question. I would never be bothered by mistakes in the writing.

Anyway, I'll sign off this topic - never meant to insult anyone. See you in the other threads, all y'all! ;) :waving:

DianaM
07-08-2006, 12:20 PM
:thinking: Very interesting topic.

Having grown up in a household where English and Spanish were spoken at all times, with my Grandma Beaton throwing in words in a mix of Swedish and Norwegian, plus my sister and I trying out French and Mom singing in German, made up words have never really bothered me.

What bothers me? When people assume that because you're from a certain racial group, you have to have a stereotypical lexicon. And even worse when they try to mimic it. Drives me up the waaaaaall.

When I did stage work, our director hounded us so much about the proper pronunciation of words, that when I speak in English, I dont' really have an accent. And when English-speaking people hear me, there's some who have thrown racial slurs at me (accidentally, they say), when trying to explain how a Mexican speaking English should sound like.

hedgehog
07-08-2006, 02:29 PM
ARGH... I HATE it when people say "ax" instead of "ask"... :mad: My students say that all the time and it drives me crazy.. One will turn to another and say, "Ax Dr. Hedgehog..." and i'll say, "There will be no axing, but you may ASK me a question".

I also despise when they pronounce larynx as "lair-nicks". It's not even spelled that way!! I used to teach nursing students and i always told them that they'd be perceived as stupid if they didn't pronounce it "lair-inks"... there is no "lair-nicks" or "fair-nicks", just larynx and pharynx.

And lastly, anywaySSSSSSS drives me crazy. There is no SSSS on the end of anyway. If you're doing to draw it out for effect, it's anywayyyyyy...

-hh

P.S. Femmy, I get your beef with the word height - however, it is a dialect thing and the Old English pronounciation is indeed heighth... Both are correct as some regions still pronounce it as such (including my pedantic mother who corrected me one day when i was trying to correct her.. I learned. :doh: ) Webster's shows both (http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionary)

hedgehog
07-08-2006, 02:44 PM
i just got round to reading the pages in the middle of this thread...

whoa, Binky... we're like mental twins!

-hh

Angelia
07-08-2006, 03:24 PM
Karen, you can correct my dangling participles anytime! :rofling:

I find this thread fascinating, particularly since I am an English prof and lover of linguistics and etymology. I know the rules, and I know them well. I bend them, shift them, play with them. English is alive and it is incredibly fun. And I do "mash" the button on the remote and say I'm "fixing" to go somewhere. I may not have a Southern accent, owing to my years spent living abroad, but I am a Southern girl at heart. I don't say "aks" for "ask," but I will report that my students are rather pleased to find that Chaucer does. :)

Since I teach composition, I get paid to teach grammar and style and make corrections as need be; but I don't do that anywhere else, tempting though it may be. (This week's peeve: the use of an 's to denote a plural.) On the whole, though, I am not a grammar snob. Sometimes ending sentences with prepositions is natural--trying not to sounds convoluted and sometimes pretentious. ("This is the sh!t up with which I will not put." ;)) Splitting infinitives is just fine with me--English isn't Latin, and I don't know what the grammarians of the 18th century were thinking when they tried to make it so.

And I'm with you, Karen--I love regionalisms (find them fascinating!), and I have the utmost respect for people trying to learn a language as difficult and quirky as English.

iza
07-08-2006, 06:00 PM
AHHH I wish I had an english teacher next to me right now. I am writing my thesis in english - my second language... and it's unbelievably difficult. Having to explain something highly technical in the clearest way possible with the smallest number of words AND in proper english... it's not easy. What is proper english anyways? The british spelling, american spelling, the canadian spelling that seems to be a mix of the two... :shock: My thesis is filled with neighbor, neighbour, color, colour, center, centre, etc.!!! It will take me forever to fix everything so that it's consistent! :doh:

Writing a thesis in your second language is an excellent way of improving it, though. I recommend it to everybody! :happydance:

Angelia
07-08-2006, 06:13 PM
Iza, you might want to check your dissertation manual (most universities provide them), and check with your advisor to see whether your uni prefers the British or American spellings.

And you're right, the best way to learn a language is practice, practice, practice!

hedgehog
07-08-2006, 07:00 PM
Iza,

I did my PhD in Britain but i am from the USA. I'm sure my British supervisor would have liked me to use the British spellings when i wrote my dissertation, but it was too irritating to me. I couldn't bring myself to write "organise", "hybridise" and "homologue" instead of organiZe, hybridiZe, and homolog, etc... He fought me half-heartedly with, "but it will be in a British library!" and then gave up.

Amazingly, my two examiners were both from the USA as well (both experts in my field working in the UK) so they didn't even notice the difference in spelling!

I don't necessarily think one way is better than another, just so long as it's consistent. That was my argument, at least :thumbsup:

-hh

P.S. The Brits say "orientate" instead of using "orient" as the verb (can't remember who mentioned that earlier). It sounds really weird to my non-British ear... but they also say "slippy" instead of "slippery". Odd...

dustinac
07-08-2006, 07:20 PM
:rofling: Now Brendajosososos.. ya know I type like I talk and drive ya'll crazy I can't help it.. its a southern WV thing... I do use .... to help ya with my run ons now :roflhard:

My dh use to always correct the way I talk or type he finally learned I didn't like that :rollseyes:

I mess up all the time on are and our or know and now.. cause I don't pay attention.. I get in a hurry with kids running around or have to post real fast before I run off and do something.. then when I come back I'm like :doh:

My dad was up here visiting me one time and he went into a gas station and asked for a poke of fireballs (a common thing in WV) :lol: she looked at him like he was crazy... I have also been know to say britches :blush:

ok enough about that... one thing I don't like is when people use like.. like every other word like ya know what I mean like you are going to go here like that and then you will turn left like this.. or when they use the word However, to say something that didn't need a however :rofling: