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niferzilla
07-10-2006, 03:52 PM
Has Anyone ever tried vacuum sealing yarn? If you have what results did you get, did it effect the fibre?

I have a Tilia Food Saver and many balls of wool that I won't be using for a while.

I figure it will save space and keep it from my cocker spaniels slobbery mouth.

Nikki
07-10-2006, 03:59 PM
Hmmmmmmmmm, I wonder if that would work? Isn't some yarn supposed to breathe?
Nikki

niferzilla
07-10-2006, 11:53 PM
Thanks for your reply...lemme try googling it...

Aha!... there are many articles and blogs on the topic... since people seem to be stashing thier stash just about everywhere (many of the solutions include plastic zipper bags, tupperware, plastic bottles etc), I will try this vacuum sealing and see how it goes.

http://www.knitty.com/issuespring05/FEATwhatsinstore.html

http://www.yarncat.com/yarn_storage.html

From Texas A&M University...
"STORAGE
Store textiles in an environment that limits their exposure to atmospheric pollutants and ultra-violet light. Relative humidity should be kept at a maximum of 68 percent. (Environments with a relative humidity of over 70 percent encourage mold growth.) Ideally, textiles should be stored in a dark place with a low temperature of 10C and a relative humidity of 50 percent or less. Moths and other insects should be deterred by keeping moth balls (paradichlorobenzene) in the storage area. This is particularly critical when storing wool."


"Crafting Storage

I just bought my first FoodSaver and I am hooked. Not only have I packaged food, but I have reduced my knitting yarn stash down to a fraction of the space. the FoodSaver will be a wonderful accessory not only in the kitchen but in my craft room.

- Rachel W."

and if you want to get very technical...

"Polyethylene plastic and acid-free cardboard boxes are fine for storage. So is acid-free tissue paper or pre-washed unbleached cotton muslin when used as a box liner, packing material or dust cover. At all costs, avoid regular paper, cardboard, wood and wood products and adhesives such as urea-formaldehyde, which emit damaging acids."


http://www.preservation.gc.ca/howto/articles/textiles_e.asp
an article by the Canadian Conservation Institute (CCI), a Special Operating Agency of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

Since my Tilia Foodsaver vacuum storage system uses polyethylene bags I might just give it a whirl.

Hildegard_von_Knittin
07-11-2006, 12:10 AM
've read articles too about storing yarn in the freezer to prevent moths.