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View Full Version : What do you charge for an afghan?


nadja la claire
09-08-2006, 05:57 PM
An aquaintence of mine saw me working on a friend's afghan and she asked me what I would charge for one. I couldn't answer because I've never charged anyone for the things I knit. I like this woman but I don't really know her so I wouldn't just make her an afghan and give it to her but I also feel wierd about asking for money. My DH says that my work is good enough to sell and if someone wants to buy something I should sell to them, but like I said I've never made anything for money and I wouldn't know how to charge. Could someone please give me some advice. Thanks

Nadja xxx

brendajos
09-08-2006, 06:47 PM
honestly...it would take them giving me their liver i think. Afghans are a long tedious process a lot of the time...ESPECIALLY if you aren't emotionally invested in it. I wouldn't even offer to do it truthfully because unless the money was REALLY good (and i am talking well over $200) i wouldn't have any motivation to get it done either. And they wouldn't be happy having to pay for it and then wait until 3 years from next Christmas for it.

(Guess how much i dislike doing afghans! :teehee: )

knitasha
09-08-2006, 07:27 PM
Short answer: more than you think and probably more than she can afford.

Here is the best set of guidelines I've seen on how much to charge for what. Flory is a master knitter with tremendous experience. By her guidelines a fairly simple afghan would be considerably more than the $200 mentioned elsewhere.

But from the tone of your message I have a feeling that you don't really want to do this project. There's nothing wrong with knitting just knit for yourself and for gifts. Many good knitters decline to knit for pay (unless they're professionals, of course) because very few people understand the time and effort involved. (I suspect your husband is one of them.) Just tell the woman that you don't knit professionally. No other explanation is necessary.

jhelanee
09-08-2006, 07:29 PM
First of all, don't sell yourself short. I haven't sold anything, but if I ever do I would go about calculating the cost in this manner. First, figure out the cost of the yarn. Second, figure out about how long (i.e. how many hours) it will take you to make. Multiply your length estimate by the $ per hour you want to charge - I would probably start with $10/hour for basic stitches, but go up from there for more complicated things. Add the cost of yarn to the cost of labor for the minimum amount to charge.

However, I agree with brendajos that if this is not something you want to do, don't! No need to give her a price estimate (although something really high would probably make her back off), just tell her you don't want to do something on commission at this time (or some other tactful explanation/excuse as needed). Good luck!

ChroniclesofYarnia
09-08-2006, 08:05 PM
For a large sized , worsted weight sweater I charge around 200 and the yarn must be provided. An Afghan would be at least double that, and if there were cables or color work involved that would make it take longer I would go even higher.

You have a skill that alot of people don't, and it is a valuable skill.

cheesiesmom
09-08-2006, 09:12 PM
Offer to teach her to knit!! :teehee:

knitncook
09-09-2006, 11:09 AM
Yeah, I'm with Brendajos! At least a donatable body part, a bunch of money and long turn over time. People are always asking me to knit them socks. I've heard, "I'll pay you" so many times. My response is always, "Honey, you can't afford to pay me to knit you socks!" I knit because I :heart: knitting. I do not want it to be my job!

DianaM
09-09-2006, 01:31 PM
Offer to teach her to knit!! :teehee:

I usually answer selling requests that way :teehee:

Since I crochet/knit between classes or during breaks at work, there's always plenty of interest from people about me making something for them. At some point, I might've considered it, but as it has been said, it's not something I'd do.

Making an afghan takes so much time and so much of yourself in it, that I reserve it for those that are really close to me.

09-09-2006, 01:50 PM
I agree with everyone's response. I'm making one for a Christmas gift and I started it almost 4 months ago!! :shock: Plus the whole thing is only a garter stitch.

At first I was all gung-ho about it but now I'm ready to poke my eyes out :teehee: I'm almost done, but it seems so far from being done.

A blanket is a huge undertaking and unless you care for the person then I wouldn't do it either.

just my humble opinion :star:

Liliyarn
09-09-2006, 03:03 PM
Offer to teach her to knit!! :teehee:

I agree. That is often what I offer instead of knitting the item. I go on to explain that it takes a lot of time to knit a large item and I have precious little free time with a project list a mile long. It just isn't worth it to me to knit for pay.

SabrinaJL
09-09-2006, 03:24 PM
I knit because I :heart: knitting. I do not want it to be my job!

Amen to that. I've had a few people offer to pay me to make them a skull scarf like the one I made for my daughter. Halfway through the one I made for my DD, I felt like I was going to be knitting it until the end of time. The only reason I plodded through was because I knew she'd love it.

If I had a timeline and requirements for my knitting, it would cease to be enjoyable for me. And I just can't have that. :fingerwag:

Of course, for a person I REALLY REALLY REALLY liked, I'd consider doing it for them. But I'd have to like this person a great deal.

mwedzi
09-09-2006, 03:33 PM
if you don't mind doing it as work, i'd say minimum $500 for labor. non-knitters really don't understand how much time it takes to make something.

Julie
09-09-2006, 04:58 PM
Most non-knitters would be :shock: :shock: :shock: at the cost of the yarn alone.

You couldn't pay me to knit an afghan for myself, let alone someone else! ;)

Witchy Mama
09-11-2006, 04:23 AM
Most non-knitters would be :shock: :shock: :shock: at the cost of the yarn alone.


thats for sure, I always thought it would be cheaper to knit then buy lol, I considered not continuing when I saw the cost of yarn but I really enjoyed doing it, so at the moment I am making baby sized items for the boys teddies using cheap acrylic yarn, I am finding it good practice and I am not so scared now that I will distroy the expensive yarn...

mulene
09-11-2006, 10:01 AM
I'm with the "teach em how to knit" brigade! If not then yes $500 for labour only is what I'd be looking at too. It isn't an easy straightforward thing to do for someone and they should appreciate that!

nadja la claire
09-12-2006, 02:14 PM
Thank you all for your help. I really didn't want to make the afghan especially now before Christmas. But the time it takes really isn't the issue I just really don't want to sell my pieces right now. Maybe in the future. For now I do it for me and for those I love and care about. My DH is an artist by trade so he doesn't really understand why I wouldn't want to profit from my art especially since it's so expensive. When I reminded him that there have been pieces that he has refused to sell and that sculpture and painting ain't cheap either he had to concede defeat. Still if someone were willing to buy the yarn, pay $15/hr. for my labor and wait for the piece then I would probably do it.

Nadja xxx

knitqueen
09-12-2006, 03:27 PM
Most non-knitters would be :shock: :shock: :shock: at the cost of the yarn alone.


Oh goodness....my MIL. Last time they visited I gave her some needles and yarn and she went balistic knitting while they were here - she hadn't knitted in years. She started a hat for her grand-daughter with some of my leftover (cheap!) yarn but she ran out and needed more so I told her what it was and where to buy it (Wal-Mart :teehee: ). She came back saying that she was hoping to take up knitting again but "wool" is 'so expensive, I can't believe a ball of yarn costed $3' :roflhard: :roflhard:

kemp
09-13-2006, 09:02 AM
:teehee: My MIL had a similar reaction. She hadn't knit for a while but became interested again when I started. We took her to and LYS and she was totally in :shock: at the prices, but also the huge quality and variety available now.

brownishcoat
09-13-2006, 11:16 AM
That's true; there are so many more choices nowadays. And in all price ranges.