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bailsmom
12-11-2006, 02:36 PM
I hope this is okay to post on here but I didn't know where else to turn. I'm trying to find a remotely good low calorie recipe for pecan pie. My husband loves it, but he is trying to lose some weight and since Christmas is coming he wants me to try and find one that is low calorie/fat.

I'm not computer savvy by any means so I thought I'd turn to you nice people.

Anyone got any ideas where to look? I did try googling it but that turned up a ton of sites and I don't have that kind of time.

I appreciate any help you can give me...

Jessica
12-11-2006, 02:53 PM
I would try googling a reciepe for a pecan pie for diabetics. My father in law is a diabetic and my mother in law bakes him diabetic sweets that has fake sugar (splenda which is low in fat and really good) and is low in calories too. Hope this might help.

melissa.atkins
12-11-2006, 03:14 PM
Whenever I look for a "special" recipe I look at All Recipes (http://www.allrecipes.com) I found these ones under "Diet Recipes"

I suggest you try making it before so you know what to add/change and read the reviews.

I found here a recipe for a non-lactose pumpkin pie and it turned out great!![/url]

debb
12-11-2006, 11:00 PM
There's and Oatmeal Pecan Pie in the November issue of Cooking Light magazine and online http://food.cookinglight.com/cooking/recipefinder.dyn?action=displayRecipe&recipe_id=1545731

I've not tried it, so cannot vouch for taste.

You might also try foodnetwork.com

nonny2t
12-13-2006, 08:30 AM
You are going to have a problem with taste if you try and cut fat. Pecan pie is loaded with butter, corn syrup, sugars and of course pecans which all make it taste fabo. To cut any of these out cuts out the flavor, believe me. Even a professional dietician will tell you that he should either have a small piece of the full fat stuff, make something different for him, or make something else lower fat with pecans. Sorry, but all my lowfat recipe books and contacts all basically say the same thing, it is a no go.

Faye

bailsmom
12-13-2006, 12:29 PM
Thank you for checking for me. That was so nice of you to do that...

Maybe he'll like an apple pie instead...(scratching chin)

He's a HUGE label reader so I don't think he'll go for the pecan pie, even a little slice.

Krystal
12-13-2006, 04:33 PM
You are going to have a problem with taste if you try and cut fat. Pecan pie is loaded with butter, corn syrup, sugars and of course pecans which all make it taste fabo. To cut any of these out cuts out the flavor, believe me. Even a professional dietician will tell you that he should either have a small piece of the full fat stuff, make something different for him, or make something else lower fat with pecans. Sorry, but all my lowfat recipe books and contacts all basically say the same thing, it is a no go.

Faye

that is sooooo not true. My dad bakes tons of pecan pies and pecan tarts and christmas cookies at this time of year, and every single one is designed for the diabetics in our family, and lower in fats and calories. And did I mention they taste absolutely incredible? If I had the recipe I'd offer it up, but my dad refuses to share. He enjoys teasing us.

jolenel
12-13-2006, 11:12 PM
I'm also strongly in the "healthy substitutions can taste good" camp. That's a big "can" though, because a lot of low-cal or low-fat recipes taste awful!

When baking recipes call for vegetable oil, I substitute in nonfat or lowfat plain yogurt + a tiny bit of vegetable oil. I sometimes substitute yogurt for butter as well, but this is a more difficult call to make since butter is often more of a "structural" component in recipes.

I usually reduce the sugar in recipes, but that's mostly because I think almost all American desserts are much too sweet (and my family agrees, so they're happy with low-sugar). Depending on the recipe, I cut out 10-50% of the sugar when I'm baking for myself & family. Again, this can be problematic with some recipes in which the sugar is required for structure.

If at all possible, I substitute out white flour/all-purpose flour. I usually try to use whole wheat flour or buckwheat flour. Many recipes are fine with 50% white flour/50% whole wheat. Whole grain flours have more trouble rising though, so it's often trial-and-error for me to get rid of as much white flour as possible.

I've not looked into diabetic sugar substitutes, but that looks like a great place to go for low-sugar! (My boyfriend and I both NEED sugar with our metabolisms.)

And I guess when all else fails, there's always portion size control. :verysad: