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auburnchick
01-12-2007, 12:27 AM
Well, I almost made an A on the hardest test I've ever taken! To reward myself, I broke out the Options (for the first time!!!).

So, I took my needles to my dd's soccer game and had quite a difficult time figuring out how to hold four dpns. I felt very clumsy and stupid! :teehee:

Have y'all found an easy way to do this? I am not the most coordinated person in the world. Oh, and I've also been teaching myself how to knit Continental. I started out this summer as English. So, trying to coordinate everything is interesting.

I'm in the process of knitting my gauge swatch. I read in Sensational Knitted Socks that you will get a more accurate gauge by knitting in the round. But, I can't figure out how to join the stitches. I know how to join stitches on circular needles, but I've never used dpns.

Also, I'm having trouble deciding with pattern I'm going to use. I'm planning on making one of the four-stitch ribbing patterns in the SNS book, but I don't know which pattern will look okay with the Two Steps Dancing yarn I purchased from KP. I really don't want to do the garter rib down the whole sock either. Do you have any suggestions?

Thanks so much!! :muah:

auburnchick
01-12-2007, 08:34 AM
bump...

mulene
01-12-2007, 08:38 AM
I quit using dpns because I found them awkward and instead now I use two circs :)

Knitting_Guy
01-12-2007, 09:50 AM
I'll be interested to see the replies to this as well. I haven't even taken my DPNS out of the package yet but want to attempt socks soon.

mrs desert rain
01-12-2007, 10:18 AM
some folks really love their DPNs. i'm kinda in a love/hate thang with them right now. i'd love to learn how to use two circulars, but from the outside-looking-in, DPNs seems less complicated than wrangling two circs... :wall:

zkimom
01-12-2007, 10:19 AM
I use dpns quite often. Other than joining, which takes me a minute or two to figure out, I find it is like knitting on 2 straight needles. After a while, I don't really notice all the extra needles floating around. I flatten the needles I'm not working with down and just focus on the 2 needles I'm working with at the time. Then I rotate and do the same with the next 2 needles. C'mon people, my son made his first pair of socks in fifth grade! If fifth graders can use dpns, so can all of us so called "grown-ups!" :teehee:

I have Cat Bordhi's sock book but when I got it I was trying to avoid making anything on needles smaller than a 7 cause my wrists were killing me but that seems to have worked itself out somehow and now I'm thinking of pulling the book out and making socks on circulars. So far, I have only made toe up socks but since I got over my "kitchnerphobia" (thanks to Amy's video :happydance:) I think I can attempt a regular sock pattern now.

Best,
Susan

Webigail
01-12-2007, 10:50 AM
I'm a newbie to knitting, don't know why I decided to tackle socks so early on, but I don't regret it.

I took a sock class on Sunday; we are using 2 cirs for the socks. However, I decided that since I ordered an entire set of DPNs, I was going to dive in and learn to make socks both ways.

Initially, I was challenged by using the DPNs, not because it was so difficult, but becuase the thread is so fine, fragile and because the needles (#0) are so darn tiney (think tooth pick thickness).

Ok, so on to the actual knitting. It really isn't that different than knitting on straight needles. The hardest part is preventing the stitches from falling off of the other needles while you're knitting. I try to remember to make sure that the stitches are in the middle of the needle, as to prevent the stitches from falling off.

While, I am glad that I used the DPNs, I think that using 2 circs is much easier. Ironically, this experience has caused me to run into every major knitting disaster, but rather than rip, or abort my mission, I learned to fix just about every mistake.

Knitting socks on DPNs gets easier after about the 5th or 6th row http://raisinggiftedchildren.com/showimage.php?pid=67&filename=IMG_5701.JPG

http://raisinggiftedchildren.com/showimage.php?pid=67&filename=IMG_5699.JPG[/img]

Webigail
01-12-2007, 10:50 AM
I'm a newbie to knitting, don't know why I decided to tackle socks so early on, but I don't regret it.

I took a sock class on Sunday; we are using 2 cirs for the socks. However, I decided that since I ordered an entire set of DPNs, I was going to dive in and learn to make socks both ways.

Initially, I was challenged by using the DPNs, not because it was so difficult, but becuase the thread is so fine, fragile and because the needles (#0) are so darn tiney (think tooth pick thickness).

Ok, so on to the actual knitting. It really isn't that different than knitting on straight needles. The hardest part is preventing the stitches from falling off of the other needles while you're knitting. I try to remember to make sure that the stitches are in the middle of the needle, as to prevent the stitches from falling off.

While, I am glad that I used the DPNs, I think that using 2 circs is much easier. Ironically, this experience has caused me to run into every major knitting disaster, but rather than rip, or abort my mission, I learned to fix just about every mistake.

Knitting socks on DPNs gets easier after about the 5th or 6th row
http://raisinggiftedchildren.com/showimage.php?pid=67&filename=IMG_5699.JPG
http://raisinggiftedchildren.com/showimage.php?pid=67&filename=IMG_5701.JPG

sara_jayne
01-12-2007, 12:31 PM
I've only ever knit socks on DPNs and I love it! Getting the first round done is pretty hard, but with practice it will get easier.

What you can do is use your table. For your very first stitch, when you join all the stitches you'll just need to pull that stitch extra tight. Once you get done with the first round and knit the second row in to that first stitch you can pull the cast on tail and it will tighten that first stitch. Joining is similar to circulars, there is just that extra needle in there!

You can set the DPNs on the table, to give yourself a little more stability on those first few rounds. The needles will hold on to that triangle easier if you have a good surface to set them on.

As far as holding the needles, I try not to worry about them and just concentrate on the two needles I'm knitting with. When I do get "stuck" I put the two working needles (the backs of them) under the points of the needle I'm not working and then those points of the unused needles come through the gap between my thumb and index finger. More confused?

I hope you can figure it out! :heart:

Stiney
01-12-2007, 12:40 PM
Are you using metal DPNs? :shock:

I've only used bamboo so far, and I find them slide-y enough on some yarns that I've taken to using point-protectors so my stitches don't go flying off.

If you can join in the round on a circular needle, you can do it on DPNs. Just pretend it's one circular instead of 4 or 5 needles.

psammeadred
01-12-2007, 01:50 PM
Once you get used to DPNs, they're SO much easier to use. It's a breeze once you get the first bit of knitting done. Just keep plugging away at it, and it'll come to you!

HamburgKnitter
01-12-2007, 02:53 PM
I started knitting in mid-October and in mid-November I started the online Silver Sock Tutorial...I worked on the socks off and on and finished them at Christmas. And they even fit, wow. :happydance:

I used Regia cotton/bamboo mix yarn and US #1 bamboo needles.

I spent several hours wrestling with the DPNs and the first row was REALLY hard. But after that it got fairly easy...and practise does make, er, "pretty good". :teehee: I found the first row of the second sock quite a bit easier than on the first sock.

Last week I got really brave and started a pair of knucks! (from Knitty) Knitting those tiny finger-tubes on metal DPNs was another experience, lemme tell you....but I've got the first hand finished (except for sewing up the gaps between the fingers) and the second one will be done tomorrow probably.

So DPNs really just take some getting used to...then it's no problem. And it's great practise when you're trying to improve your knitting.

losnana
01-12-2007, 02:57 PM
I've done socks on DPNs and never felt comfortable with all those needles. I much prefer using one long circ.(ML). I never tried 2 circs.

auburnchick
01-12-2007, 03:16 PM
Thanks for the encouragement.

I am using my new Options (someone asked if they were metal).

I still want to know, though, how to join the stitches. I'm sure I do it after dividing the stitches among the three needles.

Do I take needle #3 (right hand) and knit the first stitch of needle #1 (left hand)? Would that give me one more than I'm supposed to have on needle #3?

Also, I'm still not sure about the pattern to choose. Can someone who has had more experience with patterns/yarn colors help me? I'm not in the fashion know-how. I really don't want my pattern to get lost in the color of the yarn. I have the KP Two Step Dancing yarn.

Thanks again!!!!

Stiney
01-12-2007, 03:20 PM
You join using needle #4. You'll have Needle 3 on the right with the working yarn, and needle 1 on the left. Use needle 4 to knit into needle 1, and wrap the working yarn tightly as you finish the knit stitch.

(Options are technically just the interchangables. ;) That's why I asked.)

auburnchick
01-12-2007, 03:41 PM
Thank you!!! :muah:

That's how I did it for my swatch, but I wasn't sure. It looked right, but I wanted to check.

Do you have suggestions about the pattern???

Stiney
01-12-2007, 03:51 PM
I'm new to sock knitting myself.

But I like the baby cable rib in the SKS book. It's easy to memorize. A bit tricky on the pattern row, but not bad once you get the hang of it.

ann in ma
01-12-2007, 03:56 PM
I'm currently knitting my first pair of socks .. like you, I chose the 4-stitch pattern from SKS. What I did was just use plain stockinette instead of any of the rib patterns. I did rib the cuff in 2x2 rib, but the rest was stockinette. I figured that just staring with dpns, I didn't want to get too complicated.

Following a tip I read here, I had success avoiding ladders -- something I'd never been able to do before when working with dpns. While knitting the cuff, I would knit 4 stitches extra (k2, p2) off of the next needle before starting again with the empty needle. So for instance, if I had 16 stitches on needle #1, I'd k2p2 across the 16, then use that same needle to k2p2 the 4 stitches on needle #2, just as if I were knitting with 2 straight needles. So now I have 20 stitches on needle #1. Pick up the empty needle and start knitting across needle #2 ... when I get to needle #3, knit/purl the first 4 stitches onto needle #2 ...

If you prefer to use a marker to mark the start of the round, you can do that -- I just go by the tail from the cast-on.

I did this each round for the cuff, and then also when I switched to stockinette until I got to the heel flap. In this way, the join of the needles was never lined up with the row before, avoiding obvious ladders.

One I got to the heel flap, I rearranged the stiches so that all of the heel flap stitches (1/2 of the total number of stitches) were on needle #2, with an equal number of stitches on #1 and #3.

Hope this helps!

auburnchick
01-12-2007, 04:13 PM
Ann,

Thanks for the easy-to-understand directions! I will certainly try your advice.

But I like the baby cable rib in the SKS book.

I was leaning toward this pattern as well. The K2tog makes me nervous because I haven't had much luck with it in the past.

In this pattern: "*k2tog and leave sts on needle, knit first st and slide both off needle, P2 rep from *" aren't I getting rid of one stitch?

Stiney
01-12-2007, 04:16 PM
Okay, normally, when you k2together, you wind up with 1 stitch instead of 2.

And normally, when you cable, you slip stitch 1 off the needle, knit stitch 2, knit stich 1.

This time, you will knit stitches 1 and 2 together, but don't slide them off the left needle (you know have one stitch on the right-hand needle.)

Reinsert your right needle into stitch 1 only, and knit it. You know have two stitches on the right needle.

Drop the stitches you just knit into off the left needle.

Purl 2.

Repeat.

Does that make sense?

I can try and make a video if it doesn't.

auburnchick
01-12-2007, 04:59 PM
Yes...I can see it in my head. BUT, if you wanna do a video (of the knitting, I mean :teehee: ) I'm up for that!

Stiney
01-12-2007, 05:00 PM
It might be tricky, because I've only got the iSight camera that's built into my laptop, and the digital camera only does 30 seconds. I'll have to knit with the laptop facing away from me and try and get it on the screen. :teehee:

HamburgKnitter
01-12-2007, 05:26 PM
And don't worry if you can't figure it out the first time...I redid the first row several times before figuring out what the heck I was doing.

Why don't you knit a simple sock for starters? Have you looked at the Silver Sock Tutorial link? If you need it, let me know and I'll dig it up for you (if somebody doesn't get here first :teehee: ).

You can do it!!!!

Stiney
01-12-2007, 07:57 PM
OH, durh, you should just start with the Class Sock in SKS. I did it and it really helped. I only made one, but I might make another and give them to my little sisters to play with.

auburnchick
01-12-2007, 10:31 PM
I do have the Silver Sock tutorial bookmarked, and I considered doing the class sock in SKS, but I decided to jump in with both feet (pun intended) and make a regular pair of socks. I can always frog the project if it doesn't look good.

Thanks for all of the advice. I'll post if/when I have more questions!

:muah: :heart: :muah: :heart:

Knitting_Guy
01-13-2007, 11:38 AM
Big dummy here. Am I understanding this correctly? You join the stitches by knitting th first cast on stitch and the last cast on stitch together onto the 4th needle? And then knit normally from that point on?

sara_jayne
01-13-2007, 12:16 PM
Big dummy here. Am I understanding this correctly? You join the stitches by knitting th first cast on stitch and the last cast on stitch together onto the 4th needle? And then knit normally from that point on?

You are not being a big dummy, Mason!!!!

If you can visulazie....you have three needles, put them in a tirangle, like this

_
\ /

(I know that is kinda small!)

This needle \ is #1 and this needle / is #3. Take needle # 4 (not shown) and insert it into the first stitch on needle one. The tail from your cast on will be hanging down from the end of needle #1 and the working yarn will be hanging off of the last stitch on needle #3. Use that yarn, hanging from needle #3 to knit that first stitch on to needle #1.

So, in a sense, you are "joining" the stitches by using that working yarn, but the joining actaully happens on needle #4. Once you have knitted all the stitches on to needle #4 that becomes needle #1 again and you are left with an empty needle.

Does that help at all?

Stiney
01-13-2007, 12:26 PM
Big dummy here. Am I understanding this correctly? You join the stitches by knitting th first cast on stitch and the last cast on stitch together onto the 4th needle? And then knit normally from that point on?

Amy's Video (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/videos//adv-tech/knitting-on-dpns-rds.mpg) explains it better.

But you cast on, then you spread the stitches out onto three or four of your needles. You pull them around to make a triangle or square, make sure that the cast-on edge isn't twisted (if it's twisted, you won't be able to make a tube.) You don't knit the stitches together (I think some people do, though?), but you hold it so the first cast-on stitch is on the left, and the last is in the right, with the cast-on edge. You insert the empty needle into the left needle's first stitch, and wrap the working yarn around to knit. Then you keep knitting all the stitches off that needle. Take the empty needle, and knit the stitches off the next needle, and so on.

But really, Amy's video is your best bet. :)

And you're not a dummy. I spend a good five minutes every time I cast-on for a project in the round trying to remember how to join. :teehee:

annomalley
01-13-2007, 03:55 PM
Why don't you knit a simple sock for starters? Have you looked at the Silver Sock Tutorial link? If you need it, let me know and I'll dig it up for you (if somebody doesn't get here first :teehee: ).

You can do it!!!!

This is how I decided to do this. I want to get the hang of DPN's and knitting in the round first and get comfortable with the actual construction of a sock. I am doing this on some cheapo acrylic yarn, so if I stretch it out and I make mistakes, it's on yarn that didn't cost me a whole lot of money (and I have a stash of cheap yarn I want to use up :D ) . When I get comfortable with DPN's and familiar with the construction of the sock, then I'm going to make actual wearable socks with the good stuff.