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new2knittinguy
01-12-2007, 02:05 AM
ok. i consider my self to be a some what inteligent person but, when it comes to reading a knitting pattern i feel really stupid.this consept is very hard for me because i can read clothing patterns no problem. so if some one can help me with basic abreviations in the patterns so i can have a base to start with that would be so very helpful. thank you. :shrug: :oops:

new2knittinguy
01-12-2007, 02:08 AM
dec row KO [0:3], K2tog, (K1, K2tog) 9 [11:11] times, K0 [0:3]. 19 [23:29] stitches



this is like a forien language to me so plz help.

suzeeq
01-12-2007, 02:36 AM
You can look at the Glossary tab at the top of the page for abbreviations - http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/abbreviations_explained/

Now, your pattern: "dec row KO [0:3], K2tog, (K1, K2tog) 9 [11:11] times, K0 [0:3]. 19 [23:29] stitches"

This is telling you how to do a decrease row. The numbers in just before and in brackets tell you how many sts and/or how many times for each size. The parentheses tell you to do what's inside them as a group - like a repeat. So, for the smallest size you don't K any (that's a 0 not an O), and go right into a k2tog followed by the the combination of k1, k2tog 9 time. Then you'll have 19 sts on your needle at that point.

sue

brendajos
01-12-2007, 02:37 AM
dec row KO [0:3], K2tog, (K1, K2tog) 9 [11:11] times, K0 [0:3]. 19 [23:29] stitches



this is like a forien language to me so plz help.

okay so you have chosen something that comes in various sizes. what you are seeing there is the instructions for three different sizes. The K0[0:3] is the instruction for small, medium, large (or whatever sizes they gave you) If you are doing the pattern in size small you would use the first instruction and ignore what is in the brackets there. So assuming you are doing a size small you would do the following:

K0, K2tog (k1, k2tog) 9 times, K0

the 19 stitches is how many you should have left when you have followed those instructions. The part in parenthesis you do 9 times.

K0 you skip btw...it is telling you not to knit anything. the reason it is there is because in the large size, you have to knit 3.


Hope that makes sense. Ask if you need any clarification and welcome to the forum!!

Jan in CA
01-12-2007, 02:37 AM
I'm not entirely sure I understand some of those abbreviations and I've been knittin for over a year! :??

Anyhoo... it seems someone else may be knitting the same thing... check this thread and see...
http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/forum/viewtopic.php?t=24292

Also..there is a glossary tab at the top of the forum. It has explanations and links to videos.

brendajos
01-12-2007, 02:38 AM
lol wow how's that for some fast answers for you! :rofl:

new2knittinguy
01-17-2007, 01:29 AM
i totally thank you for your offer to help and for u sharing your wisdom with me but i guess i am really slow because i'm totally still confused. i guess that i have no clue what that pattern is i pulled it off another convo strand as example of crazy abrv.

brendajos
01-17-2007, 01:43 AM
Well how about this, how about starting with a pattern that you might be interested in making. The line that you pulled off is a garment with multiple sizing options. It might be better to start with something a little easier to understand so that you know the abbreviations when you see them in a pattern that is more complicated like this one.

That being said, I will break it down as best as i can for you

dec row= Decrease row

KO [0:3], K=knit (of course) the 0's and 3 are how many stitches you would knit in that spot for the particular size pattern you are making.

K2tog=knit 2 stitches together

(K1, K2tog) 9 [11:11] times, here you are going to knit 1 and then knit 2 stitches together X number of times based on the size pattern you are making (9, 11, or 11)

K0 [0:3]. =Same as above

19 [23:29] stitches =this is how many stitches you should have when done with this row.

Yarnlady
01-17-2007, 08:20 AM
Print out the page of abbreviations and put them next to a printed out pattern and try to decipher it. It might help to rewrite it in "English" so you can see the flow of the pattern. One can't understand a foreign language without a Rosetta Stone of some kind! :teehee: