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Inis
04-13-2007, 05:56 PM
I think I blew my interview this morning. Feeling pretty bummed out as I really wanted this job.

O well - on to the next one I guess. I feel like a glass of wine.

stitchwitch
04-13-2007, 06:54 PM
Maybe not. I've gone on some interviews and once I got into the interview decided I really didn't want the job so I just sort of gave up trying and lo and behold those were always the ones that called me. I actually walked out of an interview one time and they called me back!! :rofl: I got tired of waiting, felt their office was in disarray and decided to split. Nobody even acknowledged I was there so I just left, sure enough, they called! Good luck but I'm sure you did better than you think you did.

syndactylus
04-13-2007, 06:58 PM
you know it's been a long day when someone says she feels like a glass of wine and you're left thinking... a glass of wine? what does a glass of wine feel like??

:roflhard:

anyway, I hope you're wrong and they call you on Monday!
& don't forget the thank you email reiterating why THEY need YOU!
good luck!

auburnchick
04-13-2007, 07:41 PM
So sorry to hear about that! But, I'm sure there's something better around the corner. God's plans are perfect...

:hug:

psammeadred
04-13-2007, 10:48 PM
So sorry to hear about that! But, I'm sure there's something better around the corner. God's plans are perfect...

:hug:

Amen to that!

When I was fresh out of college and looking for a job, I interviewed for one that sounded ideal. I completely flubbed the interview, but just a bit later (and on my dad's recommendation - major OUCH to the pride!) I got a much better job!

Knitting_Guy
04-13-2007, 11:29 PM
As someone who has spent a good many hours on the interviewer side of the desk I have to ask what makes you think that you "blew" the interview? (Yeah I know it sounds like an interview question LOL)

You might be surprised about what the interviewer is actually evaluating in an interview. It's probably not the things you think.

redwitch
04-14-2007, 01:28 AM
That's interesting Mason, can you tell us some of the things you or other interviewers you knew looked for beside what we'd think obvious (e.g. confidence, skill/ability at the required tasks for the job)?

Sarah

Knitting_Guy
04-14-2007, 12:42 PM
That's interesting Mason, can you tell us some of the things you or other interviewers you knew looked for beside what we'd think obvious (e.g. confidence, skill/ability at the required tasks for the job)?

Sarah

One of the big things an interviewer is looking for, other than the obvious skill sets, is whether or not they think the person will be a good "fit" with the company and staff. This is a very important aspect of hiring as it affects morale as well as retention. Someone who's personality will obvious clash with the other employees or the management is not a good hiring choice regardless of skill sets.

Quite often the interviewer has made up his or her mind about you within just a few seconds into the interview. Not always, but very often.

One thing many people often don't think about is their foot wear. It may seem odd, but a good many interviewers check out what's on your feet as you walk in. Are they appropriate? Are they clean and well maintained? Do they actually go with the rest of what you're wearing? These things can tell you a lot about the person you're interviewing before the first words are ever spoken.

I was always quite good at job interviews and have been hired for every position for which I applied. Sometimes they were even positions for which I wasn't even really qualified to fill, but I have always been very good at interviews. It's a skill set unto itself and is well worth developing. When I was teaching high school vocational electronics and applied mathematics way back when, interviewing for a job was an important section of my course.

Sanibelle
04-14-2007, 03:56 PM
I interview and hire people as well and I totally agree with everything Mason said. I have a great group that I work with so one of the most important things I always consider is how that person will fit in with the rest of my staff.

I also look at someone's willingness to learn a new job. In many case we can train someone to learn how to perform the job if they seem like they will be interested in learning.

I am amazed at what people wear to job interviews. I work for a relatively conservative bank. People come in for interviews wearing belly shirts and flip flops and shorts. I have never hired someone who did not come in dressed appropriately for the position they were interviewing for.

I am also amazed with how many people bring their children with them. If they cannot arrange for child care during an interview, who will watch their kids when they are working. Again, I have never hired anyone who brought their kids with them.

Try to learn a little about the company that you are interviewing. Ask relevant questions about the company and the position.

Always be on time. That is a big pet peeve of mine - if the job is important to you then act like it is and be on time.

And lastly, make sure that the job is right for you - try not to ever take a job that you know you will hate. You spend way too much time at your job to be miserable. The interview process is a 2 way street - this is your time to learn about the company and the position and decide if it is right for you.

Just my 2 cents.....

Lynn

hummingbird
04-14-2007, 06:38 PM
A big HUG to the OP. Good luck and maybe it wasn't that bad.

"One thing many people often don't think about is their foot wear. It may seem odd, but a good many interviewers check out what's on your feet as you walk in. Are they appropriate? Are they clean and well maintained? Do they actually go with the rest of what you're wearing? These things can tell you a lot about the person you're interviewing before the first words are ever spoken. "

Mason,
Why are someone's shoes so important? I know its important to dress appropriatly for an interview, but its an interview, not just a picture. What they say should be far more important. The shoes I'd wear are clean and match my clothes, and are a closed toe dress shoe. However, they are not brand new. What can you tell other than I'm dressing how I think I'm expeced to?

Knitting_Guy
04-14-2007, 07:27 PM
You're right Lynn, I have been amazed many times by how some people choose to dress for an interview. It really boggles the mind at times.

Hummingbird; the shoes are just one aspect and hardly the most important, but it's one many people fail to think about. I was merely using that as an example of some of the things that many interviewees don't think about. A person's choice of shoes to wear to an interview and their condition (not necessarily whether or not they are new) can give some insight into that person's habits and judgment. For example if they are wearing shoes that are obviously not appropriate, such as flip flops or sneakers with dress slacks, I will have some serious doubts about their judgment making skills.

If the shoes have been poorly maintained and aren't clean that may be an indicator of a person who is sloppy and doesn't pay attention to details, which would be reflected in their work habits.

While what someone says is indeed a big part of the interview, I have met many people who know how to say the right things but turn out to have very poor work habits. One must look at the whole picture, and not just what answers a person gives in an interview.

Interviewing and hiring the right people is not nearly as easy as some people may believe it to be and does require a great deal of skill and knowledge to do successfully. I personally hated doing it, but it was a part of my job when I worked in technical management.

Inis
04-14-2007, 10:45 PM
Well, I DID wear brand spanking new shoes -- LOL.

I botched a writing exercise at the very beginning of the interview. Me! I consider myself a very good writer, but the exercise they gave me was so vague that I hadn't a clue what they wanted. I tried to express as much to the panel when we moved on to the rest of the interview --- I just hope it didn't sound like an excuse.

I know the woman who would be my boss and worked with her on a nonprofit project. I like her and I THINK she likes me. The panel interview seemed to go well, but I'm pretty sure that botched exercise put me at the bottom of the pile.

We'll see. They're supposed to make a decision on Monday. I'm on pins and needles with fingers, toes and legs crossed.

Knitting_Guy
04-14-2007, 10:59 PM
Good luck!

Sanibelle
04-15-2007, 09:09 AM
I just wanted to add one more comment to my previous post on this topic. If you interview for a job that you really want, as soon as you leave the interview, right a short note to the person you met... just a short thank you note and mention how interested you are in the job.

Sometimes it is little things like this that may be the tie breaker between you and another candidate.

Good luck to the OP - I hope you get the job!

Lynn