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View Full Version : OT- homebased businesses?


jeanius80
05-06-2007, 09:26 PM
i am a stay at home mom, and i was thinking about starting some kind of business to make some cash, to ease the strain on our bills. i so i was wondering if any of you knitters are doing the same? what are your businesses? any tips or warnings? thanks!

roseybee
05-07-2007, 07:28 AM
I have been a family daycare provider since my oldest was a baby (almost seven years now.) When he was 3 months old I started taking care of a 4 month old, so it was almost like he was never an only child. Now I have four kids (my youngest is 2) and am getting state licensed as a group family daycare (14 daycare kids and an assistant). Even if you just had one daycare kid, depending on rates in your area, you could make some nice extra money. Then everything is tax deductible, too -- toys, wipes, cleaning supplies, food, any home repairs, phone, etc. So you get even more financial benefit than the weekly paycheck.

DQ
05-07-2007, 08:13 AM
My friend runs an ironing business from home :)

michellebreton
05-07-2007, 09:41 AM
Exactly what kind of home based business were you thinking? I'm a stay at home mom of three (ages 9, 7 and 2 1/2) and I have been in direct sales for 10 years. If you go that route, there are almost as many options as people! I represent a leading rubber stamp company. How much you make directly depends on how much effort you put into it. I have earned the last six incentive trips my company has offered and I am currently able to add about $500-$600 a month to our family budget. Again, it all depends on how much effort you want to put into it, and depending on your initial contacts, it can take time to build up to where you would like to be. I recommend going to the DSA website at www.dsa.org and looking at there member directory. Companies who belong to the DSA have to meet certain requirements and agree to hold to a standard code of ethics. Most of the companies in the list have websites where you can explore what each company has to offer.

If you'd like any more info just PM me!

Michelle Breton

auburnchick
05-07-2007, 09:47 AM
Look into mystery shopping. It's a very flexible job and can be a lot of fun. I did it for a few years.

marykz
05-07-2007, 10:22 AM
beware companies who want you to assmble things like jewelry and they pay by the piece.... if it doesn't meet their mysterious standards they won't pay. Check the better business bureau before investing in any home based business that requires you to buy in. Go with companies you have heard of, like the rubber stamp one or the famous cosmetics company or the famous scrapbooking company. you know they will be there for you if there is a problem.

Be aware, they all take significant time and activity on your part to make them successful. making contacts and using your friends to get contacts to sell them things isn't for everyone.

research the minimum order requirements to stay a consultant/ seller- can you have enough parties to meet those requirements? People can be fussy- can you suck it up and make them happy? Are you organized and can you keep track of orders, taxes, inventory, etc?

I have a great friend who does wonderfully well with the scrapbook company. but she works *very* hard, dedicated her finished basement to be the workshop/ inventory area, has people to her house every week, sometimes 2 x a week, takes her stuff to other people's homes for parties, makes lots of phone calls, tests all new products, tries to come up with new and interesting promotions and advertising ideas.....

Don't go in thinking its easy. It can be very successful- and rewarding- but it isn't easy.....

DianaM
05-07-2007, 11:57 AM
I don't have one, but I'm interested in doing freelance English-Spanish translation.

letah75
05-07-2007, 02:22 PM
I don't have one, but I'm interested in doing freelance English-Spanish translation.

Do you have your translator certificate? If so I know many Courts/Lawyers/etc. can always use translators. Often times you can do this on call, or part time. Sometimes parole or probation offices use translators too. But to work in the Court you'd have to be a certified translator.

Stiney
05-07-2007, 03:21 PM
My friend runs an ironing business from home :)

That's brilliant! I could use her services.

She's not moving to Boston anytime soon, is she? :rofl:

brendajos
05-07-2007, 03:32 PM
i have a friend who works for this company from her home.

http://www.workathomeagent.com/

I used to work for them in their call centers years ago and loved it until it was time to move upwards and onwards. It is a pretty decent company. they pay by the minute that you are on the phone i believe and they pay differently based on what program you are working for them. (They have one that is called "direct" which is taking orders for all of the infomercials you see on TV. That line group has always sucked and likely always wil but everybody has to start there i believe.) she doesn't make a ton of money and of course there are no benefits or any of that but it is extremely flexible because you truly can make your own hours. My understanding is that you have to work at least 15 hours a month but don't quote me on that.

if i ever quit my current part time gig, i would definitely consider doing this...i like working in my jammies! ;)

kellyh57
05-07-2007, 04:36 PM
I don't have one, but I'm interested in doing freelance English-Spanish translation.

One of my college instructors was a translator for the hospital. She would go in every day or so and go through stuff with patients and be on call for ER patients too. It seemed really cool, but it could have horrible hourse since she wore a pager for ER patients.

Back to the topic, I've done Tupperware and Tastefully Simple. You need a great support system for these- both at home and with the company. TW was awesome since we had monthly meetings with our team and area. TS wasn't as great, but that's just my experience.

Another thing to think about is if you have any friends or family that could use your services. My sister used to use people to proofread her documents. She paid per page and it was pretty simple, if you ask me. See if you know anyone that has a job they could let you do. Also, do you have a company that you've worked for that has at-home jobs. I think going locally first is the best bet. Going with some company far away that you've never heard of may get dicey. Just my opinion, of course.

Kelly

Inis
05-07-2007, 04:50 PM
i have a friend who works for this company from her home.

http://www.workathomeagent.com/

I used to work for them in their call centers years ago and loved it until it was time to move upwards and onwards. It is a pretty decent company. they pay by the minute that you are on the phone i believe and they pay differently based on what program you are working for them. (They have one that is called "direct" which is taking orders for all of the infomercials you see on TV. That line group has always sucked and likely always wil but everybody has to start there i believe.) she doesn't make a ton of money and of course there are no benefits or any of that but it is extremely flexible because you truly can make your own hours. My understanding is that you have to work at least 15 hours a month but don't quote me on that.

if i ever quit my current part time gig, i would definitely consider doing this...i like working in my jammies! ;)

This sounds very interesting. Would one need a second phone line? If you don't mind my asking, what is the pay range?

Please have your friend email me if it's okay with her. inislovely@yahoo.com

brendajos
05-07-2007, 04:59 PM
honestly i don't know exactly. i believe it usually ends up averaging somewhere around $8/hour so it isn't a TON of money but it really does vary depending on which group you are working on. some of the groups are direct sales (in general very easy, read the script, sort of stuff) to customer service. The customer service stuff usually pays more per hour but again, they pay per minute that you are on the phone so even if it says $14/hour you may only be on the phone for 15 minutes that hour ya know.

you don't need a second phone line in the house but you would be required to turn off call waiting while you are working and the phone would have to be dedicated to work only so if other people were getting phone calls while you are working that wouldn't work.

letah75
05-07-2007, 06:07 PM
Another idea is if you have a college near by if you can type quickly is rent out your fingers. I used to make extra money in college typing people's papers for them. They would write them, and I would type them up. I charged by the page. You could put a notice up on campus.

efsaturn
05-07-2007, 09:18 PM
I have what I found for me to be the best opportunity. :hug: It is an online mall, like Amazon, but with ownership. Their is a huge support system that helps you build your business. There is no inventory or anything like that to manage.

I can show you a brief overview of the business online and on the phone in about 10 minutes. Send me a private message is you would like to do that and we can set up a convienient time for you.

If you are not interested in building a business we also offer a membership, sort of like costco. Instead of shopping at costco or walmart and your grocery store you would shop online at wholesale and also get paid back cash. Some of the stores we are affiliated that give discounts or participate in the paybacks are Barnes N Noble, Joanns, Bass Pro, Disney, Dell, 1-800-Contacts, FTD and many many many more.

It is well worth your time to get the information.

Elizabeth in WA

DianaM
05-07-2007, 09:35 PM
I don't have one, but I'm interested in doing freelance English-Spanish translation.

Do you have your translator certificate? If so I know many Courts/Lawyers/etc. can always use translators. Often times you can do this on call, or part time. Sometimes parole or probation offices use translators too. But to work in the Court you'd have to be a certified translator.

Where could I get one?

I lived in Mexico for 23 years, where I received a Bachelor's degree, worked as a counselor, librarian and did 6 years of stage acting. I have a good handle on the language, and since my mother's american, I grew up with both English and Spanish at home. I can pretty much translate simultaneously.

I just don't know what kind of certifications I'm supposed to have other than being a native speaker.

letah75
05-07-2007, 10:33 PM
I don't have one, but I'm interested in doing freelance English-Spanish translation.

Do you have your translator certificate? If so I know many Courts/Lawyers/etc. can always use translators. Often times you can do this on call, or part time. Sometimes parole or probation offices use translators too. But to work in the Court you'd have to be a certified translator.

Where could I get one?

I lived in Mexico for 23 years, where I received a Bachelor's degree, worked as a counselor, librarian and did 6 years of stage acting. I have a good handle on the language, and since my mother's american, I grew up with both English and Spanish at home. I can pretty much translate simultaneously.

I just don't know what kind of certifications I'm supposed to have other than being a native speaker.

What I would suggest is either calling your local Court house, or the County personal office and letting them know you are interested. You will have to take a test to 'prove' that you can translate accurately and quickly. Sometimes it's written, sometimes verbal....sometimes both. Then you can generally set your own hours. I know where I live the translators are contract employees. There is one central location they call in every morning, to see if they have a job. Sometimes the juvenile hall or the jail need translators too.

Once you have your certificate, I would also contact, the local public defenders office and see if they need help. Every state is different as far as what they require, but I know that there you can never have enough translators.

In my county, when you are a county employee and can translate for your own department, you get $50 extra every paycheck.

Hope that's enough info. If not pm me and I'll check with my local human resources and see if they have anymore information.

Oh, just thought of something. I would also suggest contacting your local employment office...they might have some info too.

HeatherFeather
05-08-2007, 05:14 AM
when my kids were little I was a pet sitter. :)

I was able to take them with me, and it was fun to see all the different animals.

One 4th of July week I made 800.00

DQ
05-08-2007, 06:02 AM
My friend runs an ironing business from home :)

That's brilliant! I could use her services.

She's not moving to Boston anytime soon, is she? :rofl:

Well she is moving...but Boston might be a bit further than she was planning! :teehee:

DianaM
05-08-2007, 09:15 AM
Letah75: Yes, it does help, thank you! :hug:

I was checking out some places online that doo certifications and their prices are scary. Between rent and covering the summer classes my bank account has been hurt enough hehehehehe.

I'm going to give court houses a try, and I was also thinking about dropping by the regional hospitals (which is about a 5 min. walk from where I live). Maybe I can start out as a volunteer interpreter for patients and thus get my foot in the door.

Stiney
05-08-2007, 02:42 PM
My friend runs an ironing business from home :)

That's brilliant! I could use her services.

She's not moving to Boston anytime soon, is she? :rofl:

Well she is moving...but Boston might be a bit further than she was planning! :teehee:

Rats! Stuck with the dry cleaners. :teehee:

cando
05-08-2007, 03:45 PM
when my kids were little I was a pet sitter. :)

I was able to take them with me, and it was fun to see all the different animals.

One 4th of July week I made 800.00

That sounds like fun. How do you go about getting people to hire you? And how much did you charge? What kind of things do you need to know (apart from loving animals hehe)?

Sorry about all the questions, it just sounds like something I would love to do. Thank you :hug:

amyquilt
05-08-2007, 03:56 PM
If you are interested in selling your craft creations, here's a good place.

www.hyenacart.com

or

www.etsy.com

HTH,
Amy

chiricahuagal
05-08-2007, 09:25 PM
I also do virtual call center work from home, but for Arise. There are several of those companies, like West at Home, Arise, Working Solutions, Alpine Access...

You should check out

http://www.workplacelikehome.com/forum/

which is a lot like this forum except the topic is working from home. Lots of really nice folks, working from home in different capacities and sharing ideas. These are mostly virtual call center jobs, but they also discuss business opportunities, mystery shopping, paid to click/read, surveys, etc. This is a great place to find out if something you are looking at is a scam or not - the people here have seen it all.

Good luck in your search!