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Brrlracinbt
05-10-2007, 04:28 PM
Do you like knitting kits? The type in YS's with the yarn and pattern ready to be made (bags, scarves, sweaters etc) I am working with a LYS to create appealing and conveinient kits for their store front. I am wondering what you knitters think of them and what you would like to see in a kit. What types of items? What appeals to you?
Thank you for any feedback!
I personally love kits, its all there and ready!

lissalue
05-10-2007, 04:31 PM
The main problem I have with the kits I have seen is the price. I can buy the items seperately, sometimes the exact brands and everything for less, so why buy the kit? It seems to me that I should feel like I am getting a deal, and I usually don't. I could be wrong, but this is just what I have seen. :shrug:

DQ
05-10-2007, 05:16 PM
The only kit I've used was a scarf one that my mum got me when I wanted to learn to knit. What attracted me to it was the gorgeous colours in the yarn. The price wasn't too bad either (about 6.00 I think). Some kits I see now are really expensive though and they don't really appeal now I've learnt to knit properly.

RiverDaughter
05-10-2007, 05:16 PM
I love kits, but, once again, the price makes me think otherwise. That, and I usually like changing up the yrn I use for specific patterns, so meh.

TeenKnitter
05-10-2007, 05:38 PM
I like kits to be cheap, with high quality knitting needles and yarn, and a pretty pattern.

ChroniclesofYarnia
05-10-2007, 06:20 PM
Kim Hargreaves sells her pattern in packages with Rowan yarns, and it just makes me upset. I would pay up to $15 for some of her patterns, and would like to buy them! Pretty frustrating that I can't get them.


I don't like being forced to buy certain yarns with patterns. From what I have seen most knitters don't like that situation.

marykz
05-10-2007, 06:20 PM
I like kits that don't have needles- I already have all the needles I need. A beginner may want them though. I also like kits that have all the"extras" like whatever buttons, ribbons, trim you need to make the finished product REALLY look like the picture.

A good picture and/or sample of the finished item goes a long way.

I like kits where the pattern isn't something I'd find readily on line- or a kit for a specific item from a special magazine article. Ususual yarns help too. and as awlays a clearly written pattern is important.

if it is in a nice shop (not a JoAnns or something)- I want to be able to look at and feel the yarn- don't just shove it in a plastic bag for me to guess what it will feel like. (I bought a "kit" for a blanket for more money than I had planned because the yarn was just that irresistable, and the blanket ADORABLE: it came in a little plastic basket, with yarn, pattern, ribbon, and a the pattern had a list of a range of yarns that could be used later if you wanted to make it again)

To have a range of kits for a range of abilities may be difficult- most kits I seem to find in shops are for the absolute beginner, with the most basic pattern.

I'm so glad you asked! I bet you will get a lot of ideas... MKZ

Brrlracinbt
05-10-2007, 06:24 PM
Well in the past I have bought a lot of kits, and the reason being is you can get them with yardage almost exact. I do hate having to spend $20 for an extra hank of yarn that I use a smidge of!
Do you girls/guys feel the same way?
My thinking was to include needles in the beginner kits, but the more advanced would not need the needles.
We would also include everything needed (ie the ribbons, buttons and beads in order to completely finish the item)

ChroniclesofYarnia
05-10-2007, 06:37 PM
If you want everything together, then by all means by them. My aversion is a pre-packaged kit is xyz amount, while if you could buy the pattern, you could sub out a yarn, find the specific color you want, etc.

My big problem with kits is that they are overpriced and have very little choice involved. If you are going to package something, you are going to have a limited range or else it becomes cumbersome. I'd like to pick my own, but still be able to use the lovely pattern.

Mulderknitter
05-10-2007, 06:37 PM
I also think those specialty kits are neat. I like the one's that have everything included to make a pink scarf for breast cancer awareness, etc. I think the one's that include everything are good for gifts to people who have shown an interest in knitting but haven't picked it up yet.
I do like the idea of the blanket kit though. I might buy that even as a semi experienced knitter because of the presentation, yummy yarn, etc. I think if you do it right even the blanket kit could be a cool gift from one knitter to another, such as gorgeous needles, malabrigo yarn, a fancy schmancy pattern, fantastic basket with a bow... I would pay a bunch of $ for that to give to my grandma for mother's day :heart:

JudyD
05-10-2007, 07:31 PM
Nearly 50 years ago I bought a kit to make argyle socks for my dad for Christmas. The kit appealed to me because I didn't have to buy three full skeins of yarn just for the argyle design. The kit had ample yarn for the socks and design but not a whole lot left over.

JudyD

Nobones
05-11-2007, 05:04 AM
I was looking at kits in my local hobbycraft yeaterday, they seem very expensive for what they are, with no colour varation. (I'm not a big fan of pink, or orange). There was a fur scarf kit there for 11.99 NOT including needles. I went round to wool and could have got a scarf pattern,needles and wool for 7. Why would I buy the kit? Laughing hen had some lovely kits out around christmas but they were so expensive they weren't an option for me.

DQ
05-11-2007, 06:00 AM
I was looking at kits in my local hobbycraft yeaterday, they seem very expensive for what they are, with no colour varation. (I'm not a big fan of pink, or orange). There was a fur scarf kit there for 11.99 NOT including needles. I went round to wool and could have got a scarf pattern,needles and wool for 7. Why would I buy the kit? Laughing hen had some lovely kits out around christmas but they were so expensive they weren't an option for me.

The Hobbycraft kits are definitely overpriced imo! The only reasonably priced kits I've seen recently were in 'Instore' and I don't think they included needles.

Shandeh
05-11-2007, 08:19 PM
I've never bought a knitting kit, except for the ones I find marked down on eBay. But, I'm cheap. :teehee:

Actually, the kits I've seen in stores have never appealed to me, because I don't usually like the color of the yarn that is in the kit. I would prefer to choose my own yarn.

m448
05-11-2007, 09:24 PM
what about a pick your own kit? Pattern, notions, etc. and then "pick a yarn from X display". Or give them a price range or various price ranges on yarns (base kit=X price, upgrade to Y yarn for whatever amount is necessary). Of course, that may not work with exact yardage kits.

HeatherFeather
05-12-2007, 07:29 AM
except for the ones I find marked down on eBay.

must



not






look..........

mwedzi
05-12-2007, 08:48 AM
what about a pick your own kit? Pattern, notions, etc. and then "pick a yarn from X display". Or give them a price range or various price ranges on yarns (base kit=X price, upgrade to Y yarn for whatever amount is necessary). Of course, that may not work with exact yardage kits.

I think this would be a good idea. I don't like kits usually because I don't have a choice. And they are expensive. But I have bought a couple where the kit was on sale but the yarn wasn't. For example I got a BSA fitted tank kit for $21 which included 3 hanks and a pattern. :) But I think, especially for lots of beginners I have seen in stores, they really like someone to help them decide the yarn and suggest patterns and yarns that are good for those patterns. So if you made it more fun, like a multi-step process, it might be more successful. First pick your pattern, then pick your favorite color of the yarn or which yarn, then choose the needles if necessary. That way, they will have still gotten guidance, but had more of a choice in the way the kit came together.

Inis
05-12-2007, 12:31 PM
I've bought the "learn to knit" kits at Target last year -- but only because they were on clearance and they had the DVD (which wasn't very good BTW).

How about kits that use little bits of different types of yarn -- mosaic or sampler type patterns?

syndactylus
05-12-2007, 01:07 PM
I wish there were "bring the small bunch of confusing yarn you bought on a whim to an amount/group of yarn big enough to actually knit something with it, and here's something really cute to do in fact" kits.
that would be SO helpful. :teehee:

cathoo
05-12-2007, 11:14 PM
The Knit Picks "Mix and Mingle" kit looks really neat! It's like a sampler of their different yarns, you have your choice of 1 of 4 colour groups, and it's enough to make a nice big afghan. It's on my list of things to buy.

One LYS here had some sock kits over the winter, I don't know how well they did though. They weren't packaged very nicely, and I think that makes a big difference when buying stuff in the store. If it looks like someone just threw some yarn in a bag with a printout of a free internet pattern, I'm not going to buy it. If it was like a gift basket, with ribbon and cellophane, I would buy it.

Another store I went to would have the sample all made up, with a tag attached to it saying what you needed. The staff would help you choose replacement yarn, so it would be your own project, but it wasn't really a "kit".

Syndactylus, :rofl: let me know when you find a store that does that!

Liliyarn
05-13-2007, 02:20 PM
I think the only kits worth buying are:
Newbie knitting kits complete with an easy pattern and needles.
Charity kits like the breast cancer scarf.
Mix and mingle kits like the throws.
Kits with the correct yardage much like the bobble purse.
Small kits that aren't pricey.

I've never seen the point of kits for knitters in general. It takes away all the creativity that comes from choosing your own yarn and notions. They just seem cookie cutter and I don't think many people like that. Picking out the perfect yarn is all the fun!

RiverDaughter
05-13-2007, 02:34 PM
Charity kits like the breast cancer scarf.

Okay, I admit, I'll pay the extra to get those kits. No one (that I know of, large family) in my family has suffered, but it's still a good cause. Then I donate the scarf to charity because I just loathe the color pink. :teehee: