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View Full Version : Pick or Throw?


Hygiene Mama
07-16-2007, 12:33 AM
I throw, I've tried to pick, but I just can't get the hang of it!

suzeeq
07-16-2007, 12:37 AM
That's okay, you don't have to.

Jan in CA
07-16-2007, 12:41 AM
I throw. I find I can just work faster that way. Also less arm movement for me than picking.

Knitting_Guy
07-16-2007, 12:50 AM
throw.

Rhea
07-16-2007, 12:58 AM
When I knit, I pick. When I purl, I throw.

redheadrachel
07-16-2007, 01:35 AM
I'm a newly converted picker. :) Both definitely have their merits, though!

Lieke
07-16-2007, 04:17 AM
throw

lissie
07-16-2007, 05:07 AM
I'm a thrower. Many people have said picking is faster but I'm not really concerned about speed. I like to enjoy my knitting nice and slow but it'll be useful to know how to knit both ways. :)

Susan P.
07-16-2007, 05:44 AM
I have no idea what you guys are talking about as such :)

suzeeq
07-16-2007, 09:56 AM
In other words Susan, picking is continental, throwins is English.

Knit1Drop1
07-16-2007, 10:05 AM
"Pick" to knit and "throw" to purl. I am trying to convert to picking for purl but my stitches feel too loose and I always feel like I am in danger of dropping stitches. I don't know if I will ever make the switch.

Does anyone else dislike the whole "pick" and "throw" terminology? I don't know what rock I have been living under but I have been knitting for 16 years and only recently do I see these terms bandied around. Picking makes me think of a banjo and when people say throwing the yarn I see the ball rolling across the room. I just find it weird.

kemp
07-16-2007, 10:10 AM
Continental here. I think that seemed easier to me when I started since I already knew how to crochet.

Jan in CA
07-16-2007, 10:29 AM
"Pick" to knit and "throw" to purl.

Doesn't that take forever when you are ribbing or some other multi-stitch pattern?

Does anyone else dislike the whole "pick" and "throw" terminology?
I prefer "english" and "continental", but I've heard the terms.

I wouldn't sweat knitting one way or the other. Continental knitters always say it's faster, but who the heck cares. Just do what works for you and makes you happy.

IBAmyB
07-16-2007, 10:49 AM
I'm a "thrower".... I have tried "picking", but I haven't gotten the hang of it yet...

Knit1Drop1
07-16-2007, 02:10 PM
Doesn't that take forever when you are ribbing or some other multi-stitch pattern?

(with regard to throw to purl and pick to knit...)

I guess I could have been a little more explicit... I throw exclusively if I am doing ribbing or some other pattern type thing. And throwing exclusively still seems to make ribbing tedious, which is why I have been trying to learn to pick to purl... but I don't know. Just can't seem to get the hang of it.

Jan in CA
07-16-2007, 02:42 PM
(with regard to throw to purl and pick to knit...)

I guess I could have been a little more explicit... I throw exclusively if I am doing ribbing or some other pattern type thing. And throwing exclusively still seems to make ribbing tedious, which is why I have been trying to learn to pick to purl... but I don't know. Just can't seem to get the hang of it.

Ohhhh I see. :teehee: I can pick and I do it when I am doing fair isle because I use both hands, but I'm not comfortable with it. I figure I'm not in any speed knitting contests so I might as well do what works for me. ;-)

Slim
07-16-2007, 04:39 PM
I'm so relieved that so many other people knit English style ("throw"). I thought I was the only one. I learned that way as a child and it just feels right. I'm not in a hurry, and want to enjoy my knitting, so I've no plans to learn Continental.

Ellen Edwards
07-16-2007, 04:46 PM
I've knitted English since I started about 30 years ago (I didn't continue it all these years, but picked it back up about 3 years ago.) I didn't even know there were different methods, but I do remember my SIL telling me long ago that I was knitting "wrong". (But I was coming out with the same stitches as she, so how could it be "wrong", I reasoned to myself. I have since learned that Annie Modesette had the same problems.)
For the last month, I've been trying to knit Continental exclusively, because I got the Elizabeth Zimmerman DVD for Mother's Day and she really recommended the Continental way. If you can do both, you can do color-knitting much better, she says. SO I'm trying hard, but it's HARD for me to do it. My left hand hurts so much, from doing all the work--still I can see that "picking" has less hand motion than throwing. I just wish my guage would finally even out. If not, I guess I'l just go back to English!!

Braden
07-16-2007, 05:09 PM
Continental knitters always say it's faster, but who the heck cares. Just do what works for you and makes you happy.

I've always said it doesn't matter which style you use, it's just how comfortable you are with your particular method. :shrug:

DQ
07-16-2007, 05:24 PM
I'm an English ('throw') knitter :mrgreen:

wolfette
07-16-2007, 05:38 PM
I throw left-handed, even though I'm a righty.

Phaedra
07-16-2007, 08:10 PM
I throw. I'm left handed but can't seem to do anything with it other than write. I learned to knit from books and it was/is much easier to just follow what I saw/see.

Aliann
07-16-2007, 08:38 PM
I'm a thrower

cougarchick
07-16-2007, 11:19 PM
I am a thrower. I taught myself and that was what the book i picked up taught.

mkkl19
07-16-2007, 11:27 PM
Well I just have my own style I throw with my left hand. So I do a cross between them both.

jdee
07-16-2007, 11:27 PM
I'm a thrower. I've tried continental, but I just can't seem to get it. Then, one day, I decided to stop stressing over it, and just accept that I'm an English knitter....and it's ok. :lol:

Phretys
07-17-2007, 02:40 AM
Picker. I was a crocheter first so picking came more naturally. I tried teaching my daughter to pick, but she isn't really getting it so I'm going to teach her to throw the next time she wants to try knitting.

Debi

OryxRun
07-17-2007, 09:16 AM
I like both methods. I was taught by my mom who threw but about 16 years ago my left pointer was slammed in a safe and I couldn't hold my needles so...I taught myself another method. It has come in handy for me though. I knit for fun and enjoy knowing various techniques.

auburnchick
07-17-2007, 09:18 AM
I can now do both! I taught myself English but just recently learned Continental. I find that my hands don't get as sore using Continental, and I'd like to try fair isle sometime, which I've read is easier if you can knit Continental.

I'm teaching dd to knit, and she's a thrower. Whatever makes you happy is my motto!

nonny2t
07-17-2007, 09:22 AM
I knit left handed so I throw.

mulene
07-17-2007, 09:25 AM
I throw. I kinda throw in a strange way and my yarn is wrapped twice round my index finger. It makes people gasp and wonder how on earth I get the tension right!

I'd like to try continental

loveswildflowers
07-17-2007, 10:58 AM
I throw too. I can knit continental, but only do it when I get tired of throwing or when I am doing fair isle. I just cannot for the life of me figure out how to purl continental. I really think I am just as fast at throwing as I am at picking. It just feels better to throw. Plus I don't really "throw" the yarn with a big motion, I just move the yarn around the right hand needle using my right index finger. It seems like it is minimal motion for my strongly right-handed tendancies.

annomalley
07-17-2007, 06:44 PM
I'm a thrower. I'm trying to learn to pick because I have tendonitis in my right wrist and when it gets humid out (or the season's change or the weather changes), my wrist starts to ache, so I have to put the knitting down. I can do the knit stitch continental, but I still have a hard time trying hold onto the yarn in my left hand and maintain even tension. I've given up on trying to purl continental. I just can't get the hang of it at all.

Songbirdy
07-17-2007, 06:54 PM
I pick now, but just learned this past year. Before that I threw for 4 years.