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Knitting_Guy
08-07-2007, 08:13 PM
I was sitting at the counter in the truckstop a little while ago eating my dinner and chatting with the other drivers congregated there.

After I finished eating I pulled out the Irish Hiking Scarf I've been working on and started knitting. The driver on my left mentioned that he had been hearing about a lot of truckers taking up knitting recently. Seems they were talking about it on the XM Radio trucker's channels or something.

I explained how relaxing it is and he said he could see that it would be. Looked like he was seriously thinking about it.

The waitress walked over, she's very young - maybe late teens or early 20s tops, and said "That's really cool! How do you do that?"

I showed her the scarf and she insisted that I knit a little to show her how it's done. She then repeated that it was really cool and then asked me a question that almost knocked me off my seat. "What do you call that?"

"Ummm," I replied, "it's called knitting."

She said she had heard of that but had never actually seen it. I couldn't believe what she was saying. I thought everyone knew what knitting was.

An older lady, also a waitress, walked over and took a look. She said the seeing me knitting was a first for her, to which I chuckled a bit, and then she commented on how relaxing it is. She's a knitter herself.

I am just amazed to no end that someone would actually not know what knitting is or looks like. Very odd.

redheadrachel
08-07-2007, 08:18 PM
Yeah, that does seem pretty strange, just like you said - it seems like everyone should know at least what knitting IS, even if they know nothing about how to do it.
However, I think it is just so extremely cool that you're a trucker/knitter. Just that you can go to truck stops and knit and other truckers and inquisitve, wanting to learn more about the cool stuff you're making. And if you hadn't been knitting there, that poor girl may have NEVER been introduced to knitting - that's tragedy if I've ever heard one! A lot of props for you, awesome :thumbsup:

Sara
08-07-2007, 08:35 PM
I once had a job, working in a woolen mill, in a small town in the eastern US. My new co-workers were making fun of my accent and demanded to know where I grew up. They refused to believe there was such a place as Iowa, so I had to show them my IA driver's license.:doh: In their defense, they HAD heard of Ohio and knew that potatoes came from Idaho.:teehee:

Susan P.
08-07-2007, 08:40 PM
Gosh..an american had not heard of Iowa! But sometimes we find general knowledge really low on issues. I think it says a lot about what children encounter as they're growing up. If a child never had mum or dad etc sew or knit or crochet then they may not be raised to know what it is as such. And then if the person doesn't read much etc.....

I have found taking fruit and vegetables thru a checkout interesting. Umm..mammmm..is this a tomato? No, it's a persimmon. But I've had checkout people not know what pecan nuts are and so on and they've had to ask me.

newamy
08-07-2007, 08:55 PM
I am just amazed to no end that someone would actually not know what knitting is or looks like. Very odd.We have a very commercial society now where everything you need is just bought at a store and unfortunately there is very little education about where it comes from. There are people who think potatoes come from a box. The young woman could have loads of machine knitted sweaters at home but not know how they are made if it was never explained. People don't know how to sew either, but one hopes they know what it its. I was pleased that when both my kids were in kindergarten they learned about fibers, knitting, weaving, sheep, at least a little. They didn't learn to knit though. Gardening units in school are also good for knowing where food comes from. They just need to add the bit about how truckers bring all of these things we eat and wear to the store.

Knitting_Guy
08-07-2007, 09:00 PM
There are people who think potatoes come from a box.


That's just silly, everyone knows they come from a bag. :thumbsup:

Sara
08-07-2007, 09:07 PM
That's just silly, everyone knows they come from a bag. :thumbsup:
:teehee:

BinkyKat
08-07-2007, 09:09 PM
anybody have someone be flummoxed by the little cord hanging from the front of a car and assume that everyone in ND was way on the ball and already driving hybrid electric cars?
block heaters people...yeah, my 78 olds cutlass is actually green! :doh::teehee:

we learned in school all about where things come from on farms and so on. even hubby had more of that having gone to school in a rural area, even if he didn't grow up on a farm

Indygirl
08-07-2007, 09:24 PM
That's just silly, everyone knows they come from a bag. :thumbsup:
:roflhard::roflhard: Funny guy!

Ingrid
08-07-2007, 09:30 PM
Recently, I had a 4-year-old ask me what I was knitting. He's on the right track!

Knitting_Guy
08-07-2007, 09:31 PM
LOL it's like the old guy who decided to move from Wisconsin to a warmer climate. He packed up his old pickup truck and then strapped a snow shovel to it's hood.

His friend asked him why he strapped the snow shovel to the hood. He replied "I'm going to keep driving South until someone asks me 'What's that?' and then I'll know I'm there".

anybody have someone be flummoxed by the little cord hanging from the front of a car and assume that everyone in ND was way on the ball and already driving hybrid electric cars?
block heaters people...yeah, my 78 olds cutlass is actually green! :doh::teehee:

we learned in school all about where things come from on farms and so on. even hubby had more of that having gone to school in a rural area, even if he didn't grow up on a farm

Stiney
08-07-2007, 09:33 PM
anybody have someone be flummoxed by the little cord hanging from the front of a car and assume that everyone in ND was way on the ball and already driving hybrid electric cars?
block heaters people...yeah, my 78 olds cutlass is actually green! :doh::teehee:

Uh....what? :??


I guess the girl had never watched a cartoon before, either. :?eyebrow:

jpenguin
08-07-2007, 09:50 PM
Mason, you have too much down time from the road if you are knitting in truck stops at the dinner counter.:happydance: My DH owns a Logistics company so I know you guys have plenty of regulated down time. What a way to pass the time other than knitting. I love it! I have two kids who play travel softball (fastpitch) & baseball during the summer & my 17 yr old daughter plays fastpitch softball, basketball & lacrosse for her high school so I am always found inbetween softball games with knitting in my hands & knitting during the entire basketball games. It amazes me how many young girls & sometimes boys come up to me & ask me what I am doing. I tell them knitting & get either a "neat" or "cool" like you did and then they stand there & watch forever. Every so often I get the attention of an adult who tells me "I wish I could do that". I tell then they can. It really is ashame that kids of today's generations don't know these crafts that I saw my grandmother & mother doing. Tried to teach my 21 yr old daughter & 17 yr old but they have no interest in learning until this summer my 17 yr old learned to knit & purl. Still haven't gotten past practice squares but that is okay. One day she will pick it up again & remember the time that she learned it over the summer.

Happy Knitting Mason & if you ever get stuck in an Atlanta truck stop give me an email & I will come knit with you. :X:

Knitting_Guy
08-07-2007, 10:03 PM
Yeah actually I am having too much down time today. I unloaded this morning and have been sitting ever since waiting for them to find me another load. It happens sometimes as we do specialized hauling.

Ah well, at least there's knitting.

cristina61
08-07-2007, 10:35 PM
It really is ashame that kids of today's generations don't know these crafts that I saw my grandmother & mother doing. Tried to teach my 21 yr old daughter & 17 yr old but they have no interest in learning until this summer my 17 yr old learned to knit & purl. Still haven't gotten past practice squares but that is okay. One day she will pick it up again & remember the time that she learned it over the summer.


That's absolutely true, so don't feel too bad! When I was a teenager my mom (a lifelong Knitter) showed me how to knit and purl. I made myself a scarf out of yarn scraps and then decided that's all there was to knitting and forgot about it.

Thirty years later I was suddenly bitten by the knitting bug, and now I'm totally addicted! I have to thank my mom -- all her patience has paid off. When we saw the Yarn Harlot in Northern California recently my mom told her that she's proud of me for "FINALLY" becoming a knitter!:woohoo:

jpenguin
08-07-2007, 10:35 PM
Okay, getting OT, but I read your blog sometimes. I know you are stuck in TX today so if you need help looking for something give me a private email & I will give you the # for our logistics co. We have a lot out in TX usually. Until then. Keep knitting!

suzeeq
08-07-2007, 11:09 PM
In their defense, they HAD heard of Ohio and knew that potatoes came from Idaho.:teehee:

I'm from Idaho and a lot of people from the East get Iowa and Idaho confused. They grow a lot of corn in Idaho too....

phisch
08-07-2007, 11:51 PM
I kind of wonder if the reason why kids don't know is because their moms didn't really knit. Also, they used to teach those things in school didn't they? I'm not sure they still do?

suzeeq
08-07-2007, 11:57 PM
I went to elementary school 40-50 years ago and we sure never learned it.

kellyh57
08-08-2007, 12:17 AM
I'm from Idaho and a lot of people from the East get Iowa and Idaho confused. They grow a lot of corn in Idaho too....

I was born and raised in Iowa and when we traveled, people would always comment on those Iowa potatoes. I had a friend from Idaho and asked him if people always asked about Idaho's corn. He looked at me like a lunatic and then asked how I knew that! I reminded him I was from Iowa and we got a good chuckle out of it!

Kelly

Jan in CA
08-08-2007, 02:29 AM
I can't imagine not knowing the states even if you'd never been to them all, but the block heater? That's not something they teach you in school. I was born and raised in southern CA and I never even saw it snow till I was in my late 20s. I did visit my friend in Ottawa a few years ago in Feb and she may have had a block heater, but I don't remember it. :shrug:

That's strange that this young woman didn't know what you were doing! Again, even if you hadn't actually seen it you'd think she watched TV or read a book. :?? :teehee:

ADAllen
08-08-2007, 07:02 AM
My hubby and I use to go to an Akido class. Or class was going to a workshop in Nevada and one of the guys was asking if we were going to go. He told us that he was going to have to decide really quick because he still needed to apply for his passport. That's when we started to worry that the rumors about Arkansas were true.

dustinac
08-08-2007, 08:40 AM
My son's teacher last year didn't know what I was doing... she thought I was crocheting with 2 hooks...:teehee:

ohh I hope the older waitress teaches the younger one how to knit...that would be neat :thumbsup:

I seen my mom sew/quilt/crochet/emboridery/cross stitch the whole time I grew up... she would buy me little kits and try to teach me but I didn't want to... would rather be off in a tree somewhere... it wasn't till I moved out and had a family of my own I got interested... I wish I had learned when I was younger.. would have been easier instead of calling mom up and having her walk me through how to do everything over the phone... she didn't knit although she knew the basics when she was a child... I have brought her into the knitting world...

Also, I know mom would talk about having to take a home ed class...where she learned to sew and cook (I didn't want to learn this either)... we didn't have to by the time I entered the school system... dh prolly wishes we did after his first meal of Lasagna with philly cream cheese instead of cottage cheese...:ick:

Jax3303
08-08-2007, 09:16 AM
Not knowing what a block heater is isn't something everyone knows, they aren't used everywhere. I've never seen one IRL, and we get a decent amount of freezing weather and snow here in Ohio. AND I was basicly raised in a garage (my dad is a mechanic and own his own service stations). I didn't know such things even existed until a year ago when they were being discussed on another forum I frequent.

As for people not knowing the states (who live in the US).....there's no excuse.

Yarnlady
08-08-2007, 09:17 AM
That's strange that this young woman didn't know what you were doing! Again, even if you hadn't actually seen it you'd think she watched TV or read a book. :?? :teehee:People don't ask questions anymore or theyjust plain don't have any curiosity. I don't know if it's something about TV that slows the comprehension of something new or that curiosity is discouraged in schools...but it seems that people just don't have any drive to learn new things or at least learn what they are called. Or maybe because it's just that there is sooooooooooooooooo much information out there that people need to pick and choose where their minds rest and absorb.

I'm sure that waitress had seen knitting on TV or in a movie and because it had no place in her reality so dismissed it. :shrug::shrug:

zkimom
08-08-2007, 09:37 AM
A long time ago in another life when I was waitressing in a small cafe in Atlanta on a particularly busy, hectic day, a customer stopped me as I was bringing a sandwich to another table and said, "Pardon me, but what do you call that?" :whoosh:

Maybe it was that it was so busy and maybe it was just the way she asked me and maybe I thought "sandwich" was way too obvious, so I looked her straight in the eye and said, "Bob."

The look on her face was icy. But the view of my boss lady (very proper Southern Belle that she was) laughing her butt off in the back was great.

I like to think that I have learned to hold my tongue better than that these days but probably not.

Best,
Susan

Songbirdy
08-08-2007, 09:51 AM
:lol: "Bob!"

When I went on a class trip in grade 12 to West Virginia to do some volunteer work, we had the waitress at the highway McDonalds so impressed that we learned to speak American just for the trip.

But we simply couldn't explain to her that Canada wasn't another State.

And on 9/11 when I called my husband's work sobbing and hysterical his co-workers thought I was the biggest lunatic ever.

Its sad that we can't help people realize how big the world really is sometimes. The flip side is that there really are days that I wish I could have such a 'small' view on the world!

That being said, I've never met someone yet who didn't know what knitting was!

dreamsherl
08-08-2007, 09:51 AM
I think that many people are fascinated when they see a guy knitting (itís still seen as such a female thing). I have had a lot of people ask me if I was crocheting.


The waitress walked over, she's very young - maybe late teens or early 20s tops, and said "That's really cool! How do you do that?"

I showed her the scarf and she insisted that I knit a little to show her how it's done. She then repeated that it was really cool and then asked me a question that almost knocked me off my seat. "What do you call that?"

"Ummm," I replied, "it's called knitting."

She said she had heard of that but had never actually seen it. I couldn't believe what she was saying. I thought everyone knew what knitting was.


I am just amazed to no end that someone would actually not know what knitting is or looks like. Very odd.



I can believe that a young person would not know what knitting was. As a teacher I have found out that many of my students are not exposed to the many leisure activities. Their parents are working two or more jobs, parents havenít been exposed, or they just donít take the time. I learned about these activities from my Mother (sewing and crochet) and from art class at school (the public schools are closing many of these programs). Oh yeah, letís not forget the video games. The video game agers are in the work force now.

Knitting_Guy
08-08-2007, 09:54 AM
A long time ago in another life when I was waitressing in a small cafe in Atlanta on a particularly busy, hectic day, a customer stopped me as I was bringing a sandwich to another table and said, "Pardon me, but what do you call that?" :whoosh:

Maybe it was that it was so busy and maybe it was just the way she asked me and maybe I thought "sandwich" was way too obvious, so I looked her straight in the eye and said, "Bob."

The look on her face was icy. But the view of my boss lady (very proper Southern Belle that she was) laughing her butt off in the back was great.

I like to think that I have learned to hold my tongue better than that these days but probably not.

Best,
Susan
:yay: Sounds like the sort of smart-arsed answers I am prone to giving out.

auburnchick
08-08-2007, 10:09 AM
I learned about these activities from my Mother (sewing and crochet) and from art class at school (the public schools are closing many of these programs).


I took Home Ec in high school (gosh, I can't believe it's been almost 20 years!).

We learned so much...from how to properly set a table to how to sew (we made aprons...of which I still have mine). Unfortunately, parents don't provide this kind of instruction anymore, and school budgets simply don't allow for it.

Sara
08-08-2007, 11:31 AM
I was born and raised in Iowa and when we traveled, people would always comment on those Iowa potatoes. I had a friend from Idaho and asked him if people always asked about Idaho's corn. He looked at me like a lunatic and then asked how I knew that! I reminded him I was from Iowa and we got a good chuckle out of it!

Kelly

When we get tired of having to explain the difference between the three states, we just start calling them "Ohidowa". :teehee:

newamy
08-08-2007, 11:36 AM
I took Home Ec in high school (gosh, I can't believe it's been almost 20 years!).
In 7th grade (more than 20 years ago!) we rotated manadatory classes including sewing, and cooking, wood shop, and drama. We all had to do it like it or not. In high school I took two sewing classes as electives. Mom made me. I can sew some if I want. If they had taught knitting I'm not sure I would have signed up. No one in my upbring knitted or crocheted but I was exposed to sewing, embroidery, needle point and latch hook!

My son is entering 7th grade and there is a cooking elective- but he isn't taking it. I asked him and he said he knew sort of what knitting was before I started. Grommit knits in Walace and Grommit shows!

Stiney
08-08-2007, 11:39 AM
They don't call it Home Ec anymore, they call it "Life Skills." And it was an elective at my school, but I didn't take it. I don't really feel like I missed out on too much, though I wish I could sew a button. :shrug: (I just don't understand sewing. My grandmother was a seamstress and tried to teach me. I was just all :zombie:)

cookworm
08-08-2007, 12:06 PM
I took Home Ec in high school (gosh, I can't believe it's been almost 20 years!).

We learned so much...from how to properly set a table to how to sew (we made aprons...of which I still have mine). Unfortunately, parents don't provide this kind of instruction anymore, and school budgets simply don't allow for it.

How ironic--my kids and I were just talking about this last night! I think a lot has to do with a mindset too that a lot of this stuff seems "outdated", so there's not a feeling like there's a need for it to be taught in schools, which is too bad, because just about everybody needs to know how to properly set a table at some point, or cook a meal, or sew a button back on. Unfortunately, electronics (t.v., video games, DVD's, CD's) have overtaken reading and other non-powered, productive activities like embroidery, crochet, tatting, and knitting. It's sad to that a lot of these beautiful arts are being lost because people either aren't being taught or don't have the time, or won't make the time. Okay...I'll get off my soap box, now. :teehee:

feministmama
08-08-2007, 12:21 PM
Jumping on the soapbox here(and saying this with great love and respect for all of us). I think the fact this girl didn't know what knitting is, shows how well sexism has worked to eradicate "womanly arts" and having women feel good about them. This is one of the major downfalls of feminism (nad I can say that as a professional feminist) Rejecting things like knitting, feminists thought that women didn't need to take pride in a historically powerful act. Women making cloths and providing warmth for our fmailies should have been something to take pride in. But feminists of the 60's wanted us to shed this. THat is sad. One of the contradictions about Martha Stewart is that on the one hand she has revived these "womanly arts" yet at the same time has made them so commercial as to be irrelevant again. So as far as I am concerned, knitting and other needle crafts, scrapbooking (preserving an iportant personal history. I mean who wouldn't give thier right arm to have a scrapbook of our great great greats?) and other importatnt acts that women have historically done to keep our families together is an important part of our history that everyone should be proud of.

OK stepping down from my box now

newamy
08-08-2007, 01:01 PM
shows how well sexism has worked to eradicate "womanly arts" and having women feel good about them. This is one of the major downfalls of feminism (nad I can say that as a professional feminist) Rejecting things like knitting, feminists thought that women didn't need to take pride in a historically powerful act. Women making cloths and providing warmth for our fmailies should have been something to take pride in. But feminists of the 60's wanted us to shed this.Oh, wow. I agree 100%. Feminism should be about being equal and having our indidividual talents and skills respected regardless of gender. Not about acting more like men to gain respect. Motherhood, child bearing, care giving professions, and knitting should not be looked down upon as womanly. Feminine and womanly activites shouldn't even be looked down at. But they are. Oh I could go on and on and on.

Sorry for misdirecting Mason's original thread. But I think you are right in conjuction with what I previously said about this being such a commercial world. And what other people have said about the lost art of home making- they are still important arts- but just not acknowledged in a postive equal light. And therefore not taught.

MrsJSD
08-08-2007, 01:01 PM
I'm always a little taken aback when a young cashier in a grocery store doesn't know what certain items of produce are. I have gotten questions like, "Is this lettuce?" or "What are these?" on a bag of plums.

I knitted a bit when I was much younger (early 20s), and I remember a guy friend of mine calling the yarn "strings", which seemed pretty dumb to me at the time. He was a guitarist, but that doesn't excuse him.

LBoater
08-08-2007, 01:08 PM
I was lucky enough to be exposed to all sorts of needlework in high school through an elective class called "creative stitchery". It covered quilting, knitting, crochet, needlepoint, embroidery and whatever else the teacher wanted to throw in there.
It does seem like children now more than ever are not being taught "life skills" either through the schools or at home. I work in a college housing complex and many of our freshmen arrive with little or no knowledge of how to do laundry, cook a simple meal, write a check, address an envelope (true!). If they can't use their cel phone or the internet to do it, it's beyond their realm of understanding.

debinoz
08-08-2007, 01:09 PM
In this school district, Life Skills is a required subject in the 7th grade. In high school it's called something super fancy with "sciences" on the end. DS took it last year and loved it because he got to cook and make his own set of PJ's. DD on the other hand, refused to take it saying that if she wanted to learn to cook and sew, I could teach her. She opted for cabinetmaking (woodshop) instead.

PammieJR
08-08-2007, 01:10 PM
I once had a job, working in a woolen mill, in a small town in the eastern US. My new co-workers were making fun of my accent and demanded to know where I grew up. They refused to believe there was such a place as Iowa, so I had to show them my IA driver's license.:doh: In their defense, they HAD heard of Ohio and knew that potatoes came from Idaho.:teehee:

Totally off topic, but there was a news story, when I was still living in Atlanta. Apparently when people were buying tickets for the 1996 Olympic events in Atlanta, they had MANY callers from New Mexico calling to buy their tickets. No problem...right? They were told they to buy them FROM THEIR OWN COUNTRY. The dorks working at the call center [based in Atlanta, I might add] did not believe that New Mexico was a state! :doh:

There was such a joke about it, that as other countries rented houses, etc. for "embassies" in Atlanta, one guy actually turned his house into the "New Mexician Embassy" NO JOKE!

PammieJR
08-08-2007, 01:15 PM
anybody have someone be flummoxed by the little cord hanging from the front of a car and assume that everyone in ND was way on the ball and already driving hybrid electric cars?
block heaters people...yeah, my 78 olds cutlass is actually green! :doh::teehee:

we learned in school all about where things come from on farms and so on. even hubby had more of that having gone to school in a rural area, even if he didn't grow up on a farm

OK, another one...I admit to being a bit of a dork, but hey, I grew up in the south!

When I moved to New York state to go to grad school, I was perplexed by all the tall poles attached to the fire hydrants...why would stick a 6 ft + pole on a fire hydrant. :shrug:

Before the first snow I did come to the realization and quite to my horror, that they were there so they could be found in the snow:noway: I thought LORD, what HAVE I gotten myself into!

kellingsen
08-08-2007, 01:20 PM
We have a yarn shop the next town over, and they have a "Men's Knitting Night". Last time I knew, there were a few selectmen, a bartender from the local watering hole, and a few musicians. Being a home health aide, I see a large number of clients (male) who still knit

losnana
08-08-2007, 01:30 PM
Jumping on the soapbox here(and saying this with great love and respect for all of us). I think the fact this girl didn't know what knitting is, shows how well sexism has worked to eradicate "womanly arts" and having women feel good about them. This is one of the major downfalls of feminism (nad I can say that as a professional feminist) Rejecting things like knitting, feminists thought that women didn't need to take pride in a historically powerful act. Women making cloths and providing warmth for our fmailies should have been something to take pride in. But feminists of the 60's wanted us to shed this. THat is sad. One of the contradictions about Martha Stewart is that on the one hand she has revived these "womanly arts" yet at the same time has made them so commercial as to be irrelevant again. So as far as I am concerned, knitting and other needle crafts, scrapbooking (preserving an iportant personal history. I mean who wouldn't give thier right arm to have a scrapbook of our great great greats?) and other importatnt acts that women have historically done to keep our families together is an important part of our history that everyone should be proud of.

OK stepping down from my box now

I'll just adopt your "soapbox" It expresses my feelings too; and I'm the first female lawyer in my town, as well as being the first woman in Virginia to work as a "reimbursement representative" for the dept. of mental health.

Riss
08-08-2007, 01:35 PM
I had the same issues going to college. I had an hour and a half train/subway ride each way, so I'd bring a scarf to crochet with me (didn't knit back then). People would sit next to me and just watch for the whole ride. I'd look up, smile invitingly as if to engage them in conversation, but most wouldn't respond. And if they did? They'd ask me what I was knitting.

Not once did anyone ask me what I was crocheting. Most people have no idea that all those granny square afghans their grannies made aren't knitting...

Then again... It was Boston... so its a wonder anyone spoke up at all. :)

Sara
08-08-2007, 01:41 PM
OK, another one...I admit to being a bit of a dork, but hey, I grew up in the south!

When I moved to New York state to go to grad school, I was perplexed by all the tall poles attached to the fire hydrants...why would stick a 6 ft + pole on a fire hydrant. :shrug:

Before the first snow I did come to the realization and quite to my horror, that they were there so they could be found in the snow:noway: I thought LORD, what HAVE I gotten myself into!

:roflhard: I'm in NY. I'm looking for a job, and I'm worried about having to drive out of town for work when the weather gets bad. :doh: Then I realized that I was worrying about SNOW on one of the hottest days of the summer. :teehee:

Stiney
08-08-2007, 01:51 PM
I'm in Boston, and I'm using that as my main criteria for apartment. "Oh, no, can't live there, too far to the subway." "Can you imagine walking down that sidewalk after a blizzard?!"

I call it practical. :teehee:

cftwo
08-08-2007, 02:14 PM
In another geography story... My first week of college, the students in my first year seminar were getting to know each other, doing the usual "Where are you from?" type questions. I was from Indiana, there was a guy from Illinois, etc. One guy from Connecticut asked, "Where's Indiana?" This wouldn't have been nearly so funny if we weren't at college in OHIO. I still remember saying, as the guy from Illinois and I looked at each other in dismay, "Um, it's the next state west." My mom, who grew up in Massachusetts, just laughed and commented that New Englanders didn't learn geography of places west of the Hudson River.

(I've also lived in Iowa and Ohio both and heard the Idaho/Iowa/Ohio thing.)


But I did think that most people had at least seen people knit.

Riss
08-08-2007, 03:16 PM
I'm in Boston, and I'm using that as my main criteria for apartment. "Oh, no, can't live there, too far to the subway." "Can you imagine walking down that sidewalk after a blizzard?!"

I call it practical. :teehee:

What sidewalk after a blizzard? :roflhard:

letah75
08-08-2007, 03:28 PM
I'm always a little taken aback when a young cashier in a grocery store doesn't know what certain items of produce are. I have gotten questions like, "Is this lettuce?" or "What are these?" on a bag of plums.


Lol, I was going to post something similar to this. I think there are many things that "young people" aren't taught anymore. I went shopping the other day and bought a few hamhocks, to make greens. The cashier (probably about 19) asked me "what are those?" I told her, "They're hamhocks, I'm going to make collard greens", she looked at me without blinking for about 30 seconds, and then said "oh, do you eat them?". I was a bit shocked as we were at a grocery store, they were still cold from the refrigerated section, and had a use by date stamped on the front.

I'm constantly amazed at things people aren't exposed to. I was talking to a co-worker, and mentioned my BF is from Belize, she wanted to know what country that was in....Sheesh!

Stiney
08-08-2007, 03:42 PM
You know, I hear a lot of "adults" complaining about how much us "young people" don't know.

So teach us. ;)

letah75
08-08-2007, 03:49 PM
You know, I hear a lot of "adults" complaining about how much us "young people" don't know.

So teach us. ;)

He he, I'm having enough trouble teaching myself.....:??

Stiney
08-08-2007, 04:11 PM
:teehee: Fair enough. I only used quotes because I'm technically an adult (:??) but definitely still "young people."

orcoastknitter
08-08-2007, 04:12 PM
I believe our middle school here has a small knitting group. There are a few ladies volunteer to come to the school and teach kids how to knit. My LYS will sometime donate yarn for them. I think it's great!

stitchwitch
08-08-2007, 04:53 PM
You know, I hear a lot of "adults" complaining about how much us "young people" don't know.

So teach us. ;)
Don't worry, there are plenty of (I hate to use the word) dumb adults. :teehee:

redheadrachel
08-08-2007, 04:58 PM
I feel the same way, that adults SHOULD be touching the young ones the stuff they need to know.
But for those of us who weren't fortunate enough to have knitting parents/grandparents, we always have KnittingHelp.com! lol And at my college, a few people have been getting together for a knitting group - so we're doing what we can!

MellieThePooh
08-08-2007, 05:28 PM
If we're discussing ignorant yungins, I have a story from my sister's Spanish class after they watched a movie about bullfighting, paraphrased:

Teacher: Does anybody have any questions or comments?

Silly girl: I think it's horrible that they do that to bulls! (etc) What do they do with the bodies?

Teacher: I, um, assume they eat the meat...

Silly girl: They eat bull? Gross!

My sister: Don't you eat hamburger?

Silly girl: That's cow! Duh.

So apparently she was under the impression that cows and bulls are from different species. I wonder what would have happened if they'd tried to discuss the differences between heifers, steers and cattle as well?

Knitting_Guy
08-08-2007, 06:15 PM
womanly arts

Umm, yeah, Womanly. Men invented it. Last I checked I'm not all that "womanly". :tap:

Sara
08-08-2007, 07:01 PM
My grandmother's mustache rivaled yours, Mason, but you make an excellent point.:teehee:

auburnchick
08-08-2007, 07:29 PM
They don't call it Home Ec anymore, they call it "Life Skills." And it was an elective at my school, but I didn't take it. I don't really feel like I missed out on too much, though I wish I could sew a button. :shrug: (I just don't understand sewing. My grandmother was a seamstress and tried to teach me. I was just all :zombie:)

I've worked at a middle school for the last two and a half years, and I've got to say that "Life Skills" is such a bogus class. What a waste of time for the kids who are in it. The counselors basically put the disruptive kids in these classes, and all they do is read newspapers and watch videos all day. I would be livid if my children had to go through this. A true Home Ec class would be okay, but not this time filler.

Another class they are doing away with is typing. Many kids cannot properly type. My daughter was fortunate to be able to take this class in 6th grade, and it really helped a lot. I remember taking these classes years (on a manual typewriter) and years ago with a former military guy as my teacher. You never, ever looked down at your keys. :teehee:

Oh, and the woodworking reminds me of "Shop" class when I was in elementary school. What fun it was to build things!!! Totally cool!

Such basic skills...sigh...

auburnchick
08-08-2007, 07:36 PM
Umm, yeah, Womanly. Men invented it. Last I checked I'm not all that "womanly". :tap:

The Mason Dixon Book has a hilarious knitting time line that runs along the bottom of a couple of pages. You should check it out.

Rorshach
08-08-2007, 07:56 PM
Well ironically, it's becoming more and more commonplace, to see a man knit. For example, I was waiting for my wife and son to get out of a therapy session whilst I was working on a project. Funny thing about it was, I was sitting near two women and three guys who all pulled out THEIR knitting after seeing me unabashedly start knitting, nobody else in the waiting room said anything negative.

:gah:As far as knitting being a "womanly art" sad to say there is no such thing, and pardon me for saying so, unless you count giving birth. Knitting is a craft, who really cares whether a man or a woman started it? It's something we all enjoy, let's just leave it at that.

MrsJSD
08-08-2007, 11:54 PM
It could be that Freud guy again. Is there an expert on Freudian theory in this crowd?

People don't realize, or tend to forget, how much that cokehead's imagination has shaped our view of ourselves. His legacy persists even though his psychological theories have been convincingly challenged and discredited by so many since his time. He asserted that certain activities were feminine and others masculine. Weaving is the most commonly cited example, which he classified "feminine".

MrsJSD
08-09-2007, 12:06 AM
People always talk about the weaving thing and Freud because it's so amazingly ridiculous. He refers to it as probably the only thing women invented. He supposes that women feel shame about lacking a certain thing on their bodies (the famous "p___s envy"), and that the sight of the naturally plaited and matted hair which hid the location of the cause of their shame inspired them to teach themselves to imitate the effect of it in weaving.

This is the result of a brain on drugs.

Stiney
08-09-2007, 09:40 AM
I've worked at a middle school for the last two and a half years, and I've got to say that "Life Skills" is such a bogus class. What a waste of time for the kids who are in it. The counselors basically put the disruptive kids in these classes, and all they do is read newspapers and watch videos all day. I would be livid if my children had to go through this. A true Home Ec class would be okay, but not this time filler.

We didn't have Life Skills in my middle school, just Art, Computers, and Music. Life Skills in high school I don't THINK was a bogus class, but I'm not talking from personal experience, so I can't be 100% sure. I know that they sewed, and did some cooking, and probably did a unit with the Teens'n'Tots program (my high school runs a day care in the school for teacher's kids/kids in the community.) :shrug:

I think it all depends on individual schools/teachers. One of the US History teachers showed so many movies we referred to his classes as "Cinematic History 101."

I agree with what's been said about there being no womanly arts. :shrug:

Arielluria
08-09-2007, 10:30 AM
Mason you will have all the truckers in the country knitting in no time!
:cheering:

I'm working on an Irish Hiking Scarf myself, my 2nd......see avatar for my first ;), and people (non-knitters) always stare when I'm doing it in public as if it were brain surgery or something! I chuckle at that. They have no idea how satisfying AND easy it is..................oh, and ADDICTIVE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

debinoz
08-09-2007, 01:51 PM
Life skills must be different from school to school. The one here is definately not a "fluff" class. I guess though if you already know how to cook, do laundry, iron, sew, keep finances, nutrition and basic interior design, I'd say you could skip it. They are even given a certain amount of money ($25, I think) and taken to the local market with the assignment of planning and buying things for a complete nutritional dinner.

auburnchick
08-09-2007, 09:29 PM
Debi,

I think it's different from teacher to teacher. Some people put more effort into it than others. Or perhaps the budgets are different, which can affect how much you can do.

michellebreton
08-10-2007, 09:15 AM
LOL it's like the old guy who decided to move from Wisconsin to a warmer climate. He packed up his old pickup truck and then strapped a snow shovel to it's hood.

His friend asked him why he strapped the snow shovel to the hood. He replied "I'm going to keep driving South until someone asks me 'What's that?' and then I'll know I'm there".

:roflhard::roflhard:

OMG! That is too funny, Mason. I'm from Maine, and I've lived here all my life. I don't think I'll ever get used to the cold winters, and I've often dreamed about where I would move if I didn't have such strong family ties. I'll have to keep that one in mind!

Thanks for the laugh!

Michelle

ArtLady1981
08-11-2007, 04:03 AM
I was sitting at the counter in the truckstop a little while ago eating my dinner and chatting with the other drivers congregated there.

After I finished eating I pulled out the Irish Hiking Scarf I've been working on and started knitting. The driver on my left mentioned that he had been hearing about a lot of truckers taking up knitting recently. Seems they were talking about it on the XM Radio trucker's channels or something.

I explained how relaxing it is and he said he could see that it would be. Looked like he was seriously thinking about it.

The waitress walked over, she's very young - maybe late teens or early 20s tops, and said "That's really cool! How do you do that?"

I showed her the scarf and she insisted that I knit a little to show her how it's done. She then repeated that it was really cool and then asked me a question that almost knocked me off my seat. "What do you call that?"

"Ummm," I replied, "it's called knitting."

She said she had heard of that but had never actually seen it. I couldn't believe what she was saying. I thought everyone knew what knitting was.

An older lady, also a waitress, walked over and took a look. She said the seeing me knitting was a first for her, to which I chuckled a bit, and then she commented on how relaxing it is. She's a knitter herself.

I am just amazed to no end that someone would actually not know what knitting is or looks like. Very odd.

Do you think the waitress's name was Paris Hilton? Sounds like an episode of "The Simple Life" to me! :teehee:

Arielluria
08-12-2007, 03:12 AM
LOL! We were when I moved (from a tropical country no less) to Canada as a kid.
:roflhard:

Uh....what? :??


I guess the girl had never watched a cartoon before, either. :?eyebrow:

Jan in CA
08-12-2007, 01:49 PM
Do you think the waitress's name was Paris Hilton? Sounds like an episode of "The Simple Life" to me! :teehee:

:shock: :roflhard::roflhard::roflhard::roflhard::roflhard: