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Jan in CA
08-09-2007, 02:01 PM
I think "saving the planet" is on a lot of peoples minds lately what with global warming, polluted oceans, etc being popular topics in the news. I'm starting this thread for you to share what environmentally friendly products you have used and how they work for you..good or bad.

To keep this topic easy to read for everyone I've got a few guidelines.


NO discussion about global warming, pollution, etc. This is a topic for products. Start another topic if you want to debate.
Make your product names only in bold black so when scanning this thread they are easy to find.
Please link to a product whenever possible and list retail stores that may sell them as well.
Review the products you have tried so we can get an idea of how well they work.
Try to keep your lists to products you have tested yourself or know of others that have used them.Okay, I think that will keep this thread easy to read. I'm really looking forward to finding some new products. ;)

stitchwitch
08-09-2007, 02:12 PM
http://odoban.com/MenuEarthChoice.html

I use the shower control and I love it. Cleans hard water spots, soap scum and doesn't gas you out of the shower while you clean it. I bought mine at Home Depot and it's a little more pricey than other cleansers but I got tired of the fumes produced with such cleansers as Lysol bathroom and Tilex. I'll definitely look into their other cleaners. I hope they really are earth friendly and it's just not a marketing ploy though.

cftwo
08-09-2007, 02:39 PM
I use Seventh Generation laundry detergent. http://www.seventhgen.com/our_products/laundry.php It's working well (I have the lavender scent, but will try the free and clear if it's at my health food store next time I need it). Clothes are getting as clean as they were with All Free and Clear.

Riss
08-09-2007, 02:45 PM
We use Simple Green at the barn I work at. It is completely non-toxic, biodegradable, and environmentally safe. It's the only thing we can use to clean the horse's water bucked and feet tubs because it won't hurt them if it doesn't get washed out completely. And it smells good too.

You can get a gallon jug of it at your local Home Depot.. But I'm sure they have smaller sizes too. :)

http://consumer.simplegreen.com/cons_prod_fam.php

Julie
08-09-2007, 03:50 PM
The first thing that comes to mind is my daughters' lunchboxes from Laptop Lunches (http://www.laptoplunches.com/). We had started using waxed paper bags in lunches instead of plastic last year, but I was still really bothered by all the waste so we bought these. The amount of garbage generated in school lunch rooms is staggering. :shock:

It was funny -- the week of Earth Day they had "waste free lunch week" where everyone was encouraged to pack lunches that didn't generate any garbage -- and we didn't even have to think about it 'cause aside from paper napkins our lunches are waste-free :)

syndactylus
08-09-2007, 05:29 PM
I also love the Seventh Generation dishwashing soap (for handwashing), shower cleaner, toilet cleaner... basically everything they make is awesome.

All at trader joe's and whole foods too.

And my all-time favorite: meyer's lemon scrub stuff (only the ending is a real name, it's like a substitute for comet, only it smells good too). Also available at whole foods, and probably normal supermarkets too.

Jan in CA
08-09-2007, 05:52 PM
I forgot that we use canvas lunch bags from reusablebags.com (http://www.reusablebags.com/). I've machine washed and drip dried them and other than some shrinkage they've been great!

I just love some of the bottles at the reusablebags.com (http://www.reusablebags.com/store/reusable-bottles-sigg-bottles-c-19_33.html) site so I plan on getting a few of those, too.

Knitting_Guy
08-09-2007, 09:00 PM
I use canvas totes for shopping bags.

Simple Green and some sort of all natural citrus cleaner the name of which escapes me at the moment.

I think riding a bicycle instead of driving a car is probably the single biggest thing I do that has any impact. Not a specific product, but a product class.

I do try to breath natural air as much as possible, but that can be kind of tough around these truckstops. :hmm:

brendajos
08-10-2007, 01:06 AM
I am a BIG fan of www.reusablebags.com (http://www.reusablebags.com). I buy from them all the time and when I give a gift I always include a reusable bag in the package if I remember.

I have used their Chico Bags (http://www.reusablebags.com/store/chicobag-colorful-compact-reusable-shopping-p-450.html) and their Acme Bags (http://www.reusablebags.com/store/acme-bags-workhorse-style-1500-p-1.html). In the end, I would say the Chico bags are better. The Acme bags feel better when carrying them... the material is silkier... but the material has gotten runs in it where the Chico bags have not. The Acme bags are still perfectly useable so the runs are NOT a problem, but it just makes me believe the somewhat stiffer material of the Chico bag is stronger. It also is less expensive AND comes in GREAT colors. I plan on giving everybody at least one bag for Christmas this year, and may actually use them for wrapping instead of paper.

brendajos
08-10-2007, 01:16 AM
Oh, I also use Seventh Generation products. I use their TP and their Paper Towels. I do rarely use paper towels in an effort to not add more stuff out into the world but when I do they work just fine. The TP has not been a huge change for me either.

I don't use the detergent products because I still have some to go through. I do want to try making my own laundry detergent though. I also got some dishsoap from Whole Foods that is refillable. I can't remember the name of it off the top of my head at the moment but I will edit this when I get home on Sunday (or Monday;)) to let you know.

I have switched to Ecover (http://www.ecover.com/us/en/Products/Laundry/20050707+Fabric+Softener+USA.htm) Fabric softener too. It smells delicious and my clothes feel just as soft as they do with the big name brand stuff. I am very pleased with this product!

I am also trying to switch many of my cleaning products to Vinegar and Baking soda. Works like a charm and no nasty allergens.

Oooh... and the COOLEST thing ever was using vinegar and baking soda to unclog a slow drain. Lemme tell ya... My bathroom sink was VERY slow. I read a tip to put baking soda down the drain, put white vinegar down after it, and close the drain for a minute or so. So I tried it. After you do that you are supposed to run hot water through it for a bit. Let me say that my drain has NEVER run so clear. I also plunged it a bit to see if I could get any residual stuff out and boy did I. So gross and yet I was just giddy with the results...lol.

Oh another thing you can do with all those dish clothes you like to knit... Use them at the end of your swiffer type mops. This will allow you to wash out the cloth when you are done and not add more of those cleaning clothes into the world. :thumbsup:

must stop now cuz i am pretty sure I am not following Jan's rules for this thread...sorry. :teehee:

auburnchick
08-10-2007, 08:18 AM
Hey y'all. Just wanted to say thanks for the inspiration. I do use some products that have already been mentioned, but I'm really inspired to try to do more. I really love the looks of the Chico bags. The bonus is that they fold down small enough to carry with you. No excuses. :thumbsup:

Thanks for helping me be a more responsible, earth-dwelling resident. ;)

brendajos
08-10-2007, 08:48 AM
I am not kidding when I tell you that I usually have at least five of them in my bag at any given time. They fold down so small.

I am also not kidding when I say I wandered over to reusable bags last night after playing on this thread and nearly bought a ridiculous amount of new bags...lol. :doh:

mulene
08-10-2007, 05:17 PM
GREAT thread Jan! Thank you =D

newamy
08-10-2007, 06:52 PM
Wow, Jan, I discovered I can list lots of things we do to be environmentally friendly- so here is a long list:

For years we have used cloth table napkins. Instead of paper. Avaialble at any department store, Goodwill or even garage sales. Several styles need ironing-but I don't bother. Just wash dry and fold and put in a basket on the table. They don't always match each other either. I just choose ones I like when I buy more. Which is not very often, they last for years. I've been considering knitting some linen ones for nice meals...or one could sew themselves napkins.

Also I use an outdoor clothesline from May till about September here. Availabe at hardware stores. We have the retractable style where you mount the unit on a wall and pull the lines out and mount the other end on a post or a tree. Our other end is on an extneded piece of wood from the shed; my husband rigged it up. Here is a place that sells them. http://www.clotheslineshop.com In the summer it off sets the cost of running the air conditioner.

My husband uses a push mower, the kind with a rotating blade. Like they used in the old days. We've used that for 10 years now. We do have a relatively small lawn in the front and the back. These are available at hardware stores-usually smaller independent ones. Here is a link http://www.cleanairgardening.com/reelmowers.html for some. No mowing over electric cords. No gas to buy. The emissions from gas mowers are worse than from cars.

We ride bikes lots of places and on another thread I posted a pic of our new electric car. We are also seriously considering adding solar to our house, maybe next year. We also recycle extensively, we have a worm compost bin, but I admit I leave the management of that to my husband and kids primarily. http://www.composters.com/verm.php?gclid=CKap-4-B7I0CFRK2YAod2iC4vg

When the kids were small I put them in cloth diapers. We also have flourescent light bulbs in most of the house. Oh and last fall we bought a front loading washing machine, we have an LG and our water use, according to our bill dropped dramatically. We also got an Energy Trust rebate and a state tax rebate and a rebate from the city! http://us.lge.com/products/category/list/home%20appliances_laundry.jhtml

MoniDew
08-10-2007, 09:13 PM
http://www.biokleen.com/

Similar to Ecover and 7th Gen is the BioKleen company. Very good laundry and dishwashing products.
________
Buy Grinders (http://www.vaporshop.com/grinders)

feministmama
08-10-2007, 10:59 PM
I do try to breath natural air as much as possible, but that can be kind of tough around these truckstops. :hmm:

So as a truck driver, do you notice truckers turning thier engines off at rest stops? I heard something about this on NPR. SOmeone is trying to get truckers to use electrical hookups at truck stops so they can run heaters/AC or laptops or whatever instead of relying on the electrical systems when the engines running. Any thoughts?

feministmama
08-10-2007, 11:03 PM
For years we have used cloth table napkins. Instead of paper. Avaialble at any department store, Goodwill or even garage sales. Several styles need ironing-but I don't bother. Just wash dry and fold and put in a basket on the table. They don't always match each other either. I just choose ones I like when I buy more. Which is not very often, they last for years. I've been considering knitting some linen ones for nice meals...or one could sew themselves napkins.My husband uses a push mower, the kind with a rotating blade. Like they used in the old days. We've used that for 10 years now. We do have a relatively small lawn in the front and the back. These are available at hardware stores-usually smaller independent ones. Here is a link http://www.cleanairgardening.com/reelmowers.html for some. No mowing over electric cords. No gas to buy. The emissions from gas mowers are worse than from cars.

I still have my son's old cloth diapers. We use them for napkins. So soft and washable. Also have a push mower (gotta get the blades sharpened :roll: ) We have a car but I use the bus a lot and my son's dad rides his bike everywhere. I would love to get a car that runs on vegitable oil. Anyone know how to do that? There;s a way to clean up old McDonalds fryer oil and use it do drive cars. You smell like french fries but it burns clean. Either that or an electric car.

auburnchick
08-11-2007, 11:46 AM
So here's a question...

What do you do about your trash? Given the responses here, I'll assume that you don't use plastic bags. I know that some of you compost. For those of us who don't, what do you suggest?

brendajos
08-11-2007, 03:48 PM
So here's a question...

What do you do about your trash? Given the responses here, I'll assume that you don't use plastic bags. I know that some of you compost. For those of us who don't, what do you suggest?

I actually do use plastic right now. I also use the paper bags I still have from the store. Once I run out of garbage bags I am not sure what I am going to switch to. I don't have a real opportunity here to compost since I live in an apartment with limited space right now and extensive recycling options are pretty limited too. I believe there are products out there that are more biodegradeable but I am still researching that. I would definitely like to hear what people are using too. :thumbsup:

stitchwitch
08-11-2007, 04:35 PM
So here's a question...

What do you do about your trash? Given the responses here, I'll assume that you don't use plastic bags. I know that some of you compost. For those of us who don't, what do you suggest?


We compost and recycle most of everything so we only have like one garbage bag a week and we use plastic biodegradeable ones. Food stuff goes into composter, large yard wastes that can't be recycled gets picked up by our local recycle organization to be composted and sold, newspaper gets picked up by them too as do the hard plastics. Surprisingly, our area has a pretty decent recycle system.

Susan P.
08-11-2007, 09:56 PM
Not to be silly but...

Lemon
Vinegar
Baking soda
Soda water
Dried herb and flower leaves and petals

I use a product for clothes washing that is probably not sold there.

I do use the old fashioned cleaner here called Gumption I admit - for stubborn stains on tiles etc. It's like a thick paste but you only need a little and I would buy one a year only at most.

My son had a foul drain in his apartment and I poured baking soda down it and then hot water...left it a while and re-did it. No smell. It fizzed up and did a wonderful job.

Re the dried herbs etc. SO many commercial bathroom/room scents etc are made with throw away plastic and chemical compositions. If you have a really good assortment of dried leaves and flowers with a stick of cinnamon this often does a fine job as an air freshener. I love lavender too for this. Hanging a bunch up and it looks pretty.

newamy
08-11-2007, 11:15 PM
Lemon
Vinegar
Baking soda
Soda water
Dried herb and flower leaves and petals

I use vinegar and water on my floors and Bon Ami powder cleanser on sinks/toilets.

Jan in CA
08-11-2007, 11:21 PM
Re: trash... Our city requires us to have recyling, trash and green waste bins. We always have far more recyclables than trash and some weeks we only put out the recycle bin.

I'm using up my plastic trash bags right now, but want to get some biodegradable soon. I bought some bags for reusing at Target. $1 each..couldn't pass them up so I have 3 now.

auburnchick
08-12-2007, 12:20 AM
Hmmm...no recycle program where I live. This was one thing that was difficult to adjust to after moving from south FL, where recycling is huge.

Here's (http://www.ecoproducts.com/Home/home_biobags/home_index_biobags.htm) a site that sells biodegradable bags (along with a bunch of other stuff).

Susan P.
08-12-2007, 01:36 AM
Obviously not near metals but a cheap effectively cleaner can be salt at times...few drops of water and a small soft bristled scrubbing brush. Salt water is also quite a good mouth rinse.

Susan P.
08-12-2007, 01:38 AM
Baking soda was incorrect actually. My apologies. It was bicarbonate of soda (which is also in baking soda). It was bicarb I used on the drains.

KnittingNat
08-12-2007, 05:04 AM
OMG, you overwhelm me! Here in Israel recycling is so under-developed, there are barely special bins for plastic bottles on the streets. Nobody recycles paper. And i'm using all the regular laundry stuff and detergents. You all got me thinking! I can't really recycle my trash, i put it in plastic bags i get from the supermarket, it's cheaper than to buy special plastic bags for trash. and i suppose if i'll find biodegradable (sp?) ones they will cost a fortune here. I did find stores that sell Ecover products and i'll go and check it out. It's hard and extremely expensive to be enviromentaly aware in a country that doesn't give a d...n about it's nature, killing the Dead Sea little by little and lots of other examples. You're great enablers:hug:!

stitchwitch
08-12-2007, 09:25 AM
Made the pilgrimage to this place yesterday. :woohoo:http://www.wildoats.com/u/home/

Lots and lots of earth friendly products there.

newamy
08-12-2007, 10:24 AM
What do you do about your trash?

If there isn't a good recycle program through your garbage company some local natural food stores might take some items. In our town the recycling program is awsome. But the local Co-op takes frozen food boxes, aseptic containers-like soy milk comes in, and styrafoam. So we take all that sort of thing over there since it can't be taken at cub side. Mailing companies often will take and reuse styrafoam packaging "peanuts" too. There are also new peanuts out there made of cellulose that break down in water.
The other idea- though it takes some planning is don't buy items with excessive packaging in the first place. We never buy things like Lunchables and try to avoid other products that have 3 layers of packaging before you get to the item.

Jan in CA
08-12-2007, 01:46 PM
OMG, you overwhelm me! Here in Israel recycling is so under-developed, there are barely special bins for plastic bottles on the streets. :hug:!

Nat, if you don't have recycling there are things you can do to help that don't really cost money or much at all anyway. If you work take your lunch in something like tupperware so you don't have any trash waste. Use vinegar and baking soda for cleaning when you can, etc. Every little bit helps. You might also if you can send a letter or get all your earth friendly friends to send letters or approach a city council..not sure how your country works.

KnittingNat
08-12-2007, 02:22 PM
Nat, if you don't have recycling there are things you can do to help that don't really cost money or much at all anyway. If you work take your lunch in something like tupperware so you don't have any trash waste. Use vinegar and baking soda for cleaning when you can, etc. Every little bit helps. You might also if you can send a letter or get all your earth friendly friends to send letters or approach a city council..not sure how your country works.
Thanks, Jan! I do actually take my lunch in a box :teehee:. The problem is that Israel is lots of years behind on the recycling issue. People are like "oh, we have plastic bags - cool! Let's use them as much as possible!". When i mentioned that i'd prefer to get cloth diapers whenever i have a baby (i can get some on eBay), everyone looked at me like i dropped from the moon or something... Nobody can realize the mount of diapers each baby produces :hair: There is a "green" student society in my university, but the biggest thing they've achieved was that the cafeterias won't sell coffee in plastic cups:shrug:. But I promise to try my best!

debb
08-12-2007, 02:37 PM
Just came across this today

http://www.greenerchoices.org/

I subscribe to http://www.motherearthnews.com/

and they have a sister site with lots of info

http://www.motherearthliving.com/

zip
08-12-2007, 05:25 PM
Something I began in February is the following, recommended by a friend and detailed at natureskills.com (http://www.natureskills.com/feeding_wild_birds.html). So far, I'm only saving the grease in the freezer. When the weather turns, I'll mix up a batch.

Make your own home-make suet cakes. I save all the bacon fat in a coffee can and when itís nearly full I melt it down and add corn meal, peanut butter, honey, and chopped fruit or nuts, then pour this in tuna cans, let harden in the refrigerator, and nail the can to a tree. Donít use seed in this mixture because birds that are attracted to suet are insect eaters, not seed eaters. Most commercial seed cakes have seed in it and the birds attracted to the suet drop the seed to the ground which eventually gets eaten by a ground eating birds so why bother? Home made suet mixture is very popular with lots of birds, but the squirrels love it too. Put one tuna can on the window sill platform just for the small birds and one out on the tree for the squirrels and woodpeckers.

KellyK
08-13-2007, 11:43 AM
This thread is AWESOME, Janny!! :hug:

Re: the plastic bag issue, we use Seventh Generation (linked to several times above) garbage bags... they are biodegradable.

We also use Seventh Generation TP, napkins, dishwasher detergent & rinse agent, baby wipes (for DH... dont ask. :roll: ) , and several other things that I cant remember at the moment. We shop through Gaiam.com.

Does anyone know of any good eco/wildlife-friendly solution to algae growth in fountains/birdbaths?

debb
08-14-2007, 01:11 AM
I don't have any product knowledge, but you might try www.realgoods.com, it's now a Gaiam company and they used to carry things like this.

Jan in CA
08-14-2007, 01:17 AM
Does anyone know of any good eco/wildlife-friendly solution to algae growth in fountains/birdbaths?

Hey look what I found! Maybe these will work?
http://faunasafe.com/detail.html
http://www.planetnatural.com/site/xdpy/kb/algae.html

I guess I have to try this Seventh Generation stuff since so many of you use it! Next time I go shopping for sure! I am also making note and bookmarking sites you've give me for all the products! :cheering:

brendajos
08-14-2007, 02:33 AM
Don't forget to go to Seventh Generation's website... They do have coupons on their site that you can download.

stitchwitch
08-14-2007, 08:10 AM
This thread is AWESOME, Janny!!

Does anyone know of any good eco/wildlife-friendly solution to algae growth in fountains/birdbaths?


I got some at Lowes or Home Depot. They can be used in fountains with fish. They're made by Jungle called Fountain Block. They're also made in the USA, something I've started looking for since all the Chinese junk has been coming out and recalled.

Susan P.
08-14-2007, 09:30 AM
Have more natural shampoos and conditioners had a look in yet? Again, I do buy a commercial brand..sort of..from a health food store and it has none of the sodium elements and parabens etc.

This is one recipe for homemade shampoo. I would not use the oils and rubbing alcohol tho. I would simple boil up the herbs and add them that way:

http://www.happynews.com/living/haircare/make-shampoo.htm

Castile soap is mentioned in many many homemade shampoo recipes. Even if you think..nope..have to buy shampoo..these recipes are good for scented bath oils and then of course you would use essential oils perhaps. But I love the smell of steamed or lightly boiled lavender and chamomile.

To make good bath salts you can buy..gosh..what is the basic ingredient of say radox..gone clear out of my head..anyway..you buy that LOL and add fresh ground herbs to it and make it up into little dunkable sachets..cheese cloth or similar..and those are nice little gifts too. A friend once found these rather giant gel capsules..empty ones..and filled those. The gel simply melted away in the hot water and she used to throw a handful into the bath and it was dreamy.

Kaydee
08-14-2007, 10:11 AM
My parents always buy Dr. Bronner's castile soap (http://www.drbronner.com/soaps.html) and its great because it can be used for a million different things. They get the pepermint one, and you can use as shampoo or even to brush your teeth! They also make the bottles out of recycled plastic.

msoebel
08-14-2007, 11:33 AM
Well, we have several bags that remain in our car now and we use those instead of plastic shopping bags. We bought them from Ikea for like 65 cents a piece and they hold an ENORMOUS amount of stuff!

We do not buy the individually packaged products...you know, those single serving snacks? Instead, we buy the larger bag, and give our dd her snacks in reusable storage containers (tupperware). We also do not use sandwich bags or ziploc bags for any reason...we use our tupperware.

These are two ways to be ecologically respsonsible without spending more money. We also own just one car and I either walk to work or my dh drops me off on his way to work. Dd goes to preschool in the same building as his office, so that makes it easy.

We recycle aluminum cans religiously, although it's very difficult to recycle anything else in our town. They have really made it a chore to do, so sometimes we get lazy and don't.:gah:

Misty

cristina61
08-18-2007, 08:50 PM
Someone mentioned Simple Green earlier in this thread, and I wanted to let everyone know, this stuff makes a terrific ant killer for kitchen counters and other sensitive areas. It kills them pretty much on contact.

I've also used Avon's Skin-So-Soft bath oil spray to kill ants. Plus, if you can find the area where the ants are actually coming inside, you can spray SSS right around that area, and that's it for the ants -- they won't cross the stuff. It doesn't take a lot of the product to be effective. I really love it for this use.

Kaydee
08-22-2007, 01:02 PM
I'm not sure if anyone's ever posted about this, but I found a pattern in Simple Knits with a Twist (http://www.amazon.com/Simple-Knits-Twist-Projects-Creative/dp/1584793619) that uses pastic bags that you basically cut into long strips and tie the strips up together to use as "yarn" to make a tote bag. It looks pretty neat, and its a fun way to recycle and knit all in one!

letah75
08-23-2007, 01:56 PM
a local product that is great, and can be bought online are Chico bags (http://www.chicobag.com/). They are wonderful, small, and reusable! I have them all over my car, attached to my purse, in the house, and use them for Christmas presents every year!

Jan in CA
08-24-2007, 12:47 PM
Hmph! I went to Target last night because I HAD to get laundry detergent. The only EF deterg they had was one for HE machines. :doh:(the name eludes me right now) Anyway I'll go to Home Depot or somewhere else next time.

newamy
08-24-2007, 10:32 PM
Sometimes High Efficiency detergent can go in both kinds of machines. In an HE machine it just takes less. I think the 7th generation liquid is like that. The opposspite is not generally true. We are still working on a big box of Arm and Hammer detergent that we had when we got the HE machine last October. I use 1 tsp full! too much and it will suds too much in the machine. Sometimes I add an extra rince to make sure all the detergent is getting rinsed from the machine.

Jan in CA
09-05-2007, 07:47 PM
Does anyone make environmentally safe sm trash bags? I am sick of putting the scoopable cat litter in a bag and knowing it's not going to degrade for a million yrs..or whatever is. :doh:

I would like to be able to get them locally if possible.. Trader Joes, Whole Foods, etc. Thanks!

brendajos
09-05-2007, 08:46 PM
Hmph! I went to Target last night because I HAD to get laundry detergent. The only EF deterg they had was one for HE machines. :doh:(the name eludes me right now) Anyway I'll go to Home Depot or somewhere else next time.

I am totally planning on making my own once i get through this bottle that i already have. of course that doesn't mean that when the time comes i won't change my mind....lol.

I use Ecover fabric softener and LOVE it. The smell is delicious and the cost isn't that out of line compared to regular brands. So I may very well abandon my dreams of making my own detergent but we'll see :teehee:

Jan in CA
09-05-2007, 11:56 PM
Yeah! I made it sticky! :cheering:

figaro
09-06-2007, 05:04 PM
I just bought 3 bento boxes for my girls lunches! :woohoo:

http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i25/hum39/Image708.jpg

auburnchick
09-06-2007, 05:36 PM
Yeah! I made it sticky! :cheering:

Thanks a bunch, Jan!!!! :hug:

brendajos
09-06-2007, 06:11 PM
oooh i have to look at the name of the product i bought here a while back. I got mine at whole foods but they are available at target too. They have little lunch boxes, salad containers, breakfast containters, etc... and they have a freezer pack thingy that fits right in there to keep the food cold. I can't remember the name off the top of my head right now but I will try to look when i get home. very cool! (uuh...literally :teehee:)

ecb
09-07-2007, 08:30 PM
I'm starting this thread for you to share what environmentally friendly products you have used and how they work for you..good or bad.

at my Summer job, an Ecology Summer Camp, we use something called H2 Orange 2 it is an H2O2 and orange oil Product. You dillute it to 2 different strengths (Red and Green) and use it according to the severity of the staining Substance. It cleans very well on Biohazard, and needs very little Rinse-ing after it sets. It cleans up Finger Smudges, blood stains, Dirt, Food, Mold, Mildew, Various Bodily Secretions, and the like. That Company has a Great Degreasing agent whose name I do not know, but my Friend who worked in the Kitchen SWEARS its the best she has ever used (she also runs a Cleaning Buisness).
the best thing about it is, when its done its job, it leaves NO scent, not Orange, not Soap, not any (this is a good way to know if you missed some Vomit or Feces on a REALLY bad clean up job).

just my own Product Plug (and I buy mine from the distributor at camp, not a website)

My County has Mandatory Recycling with a "Pay-as-you-throw" program, recycling is free, but to throw away trash you have tobuy special Trash bags at $1 each, so we use less than one bag a week, Compost all food, and natural Fibers that cannot be reused. Box Board, Cardboard, Junk Mail, magazines, Various Plastics, and all cans (tin and steal get seperated by a magnet), Scrap metal and appliances have their own Bin, Milk cartons and Plastic Jugs, and glass is seperated by Color. A bit of work, and initail expense to make bins at home to make seperation at the Dump easier, but its well worth it after all.

Oh, BTW, Great Thread

hemmingway
09-15-2007, 07:34 PM
most of this has been said already, but i'll add to it:

my roommate uses a foldable nylon bag when she shops. It's sort've like this
It folds up into a small pouch and then she keeps it in her purse and always has it with her. She's in the process of sewing me and our friends some. It's really sturdy and larger than the one i linked. (i found the one she uses at Claire's on a clearance rack)

We live in a dorm, so it's hard for us to compost, but the university has a garden with a compost pile off campus. We put all our compost stuff in the freezer until we can make it out to the garden to deposit it.

A really simple thing is to use all of the paper (write everywhere, print two sided) before you recycle it. I started doing this and was amazed at how much my paper use decreased.

letah75
09-17-2007, 12:13 PM
most of this has been said already, but i'll add to it:

my roommate uses a foldable nylon bag when she shops. It's sort've like this
It folds up into a small pouch and then she keeps it in her purse and always has it with her. She's in the process of sewing me and our friends some. It's really sturdy and larger than the one i linked. (i found the one she uses at Claire's on a clearance rack)

We live in a dorm, so it's hard for us to compost, but the university has a garden with a compost pile off campus. We put all our compost stuff in the freezer until we can make it out to the garden to deposit it.

A really simple thing is to use all of the paper (write everywhere, print two sided) before you recycle it. I started doing this and was amazed at how much my paper use decreased.

sounds like the chico bag (http://www.chicobag.com/) I mentioned in an earlier post! I have one that is clipped to my purse. On the plus side it makes a great knitting bag too!

marykz
09-27-2007, 11:43 AM
I have a question about compact fluorescent bulbs- before I buy a bunch then find myself a crazy person.... do they have the same sort of "hum" or "buzz" that the fluorescent tube lights have? do they have that same sort of "flicker"? (anyone know what I mean? maybe I am just crazy but I hate the overhead fluorescents that are in office buildings etc. when I have to sit in a room with one all day I'd rather sit in the dark.)

And, should I just replace bulbs as they burn out, or throw away the perfectly good working bulbs to replace them with new energy effecient ones?

Jan in CA
09-27-2007, 01:46 PM
I would replace them with CL bulbs as the others burn out myself.

As for noise and flicker.. We have one right now (using up old bulbs) and it doesn't seem to flicker or make noise.

My concern with CL bulbs is are they bright enough. The one we do have is not, but I know they have improved tremendously over the years.

One thing to note, Mary.. they seem to be larger and can hit a lampshade if it's close. You might buy a couple and see how it goes. Oh and read this -
http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=cfls.pr_cfls
http://www.greenlightsusa.com/index2.html?gclid=CJ2k6ImZ5I4CFRZNYQodCzrhxg

marykz
09-27-2007, 01:52 PM
Thanks Jan! and I'm glad to know about the size warning too- wouldn't want to start a fire while trying to save energy!

I'm thinking of buying a few for lights we use a lot, like the hall, and the bathrooms, and see how it goes. the little one just doesn't turn out the lights when she leaves a room... I know its a kid thing. I distinctly remember being told all the time to turn out the lights as a kid....

madametj
10-14-2007, 08:10 PM
Does anyone know where to find compost bins?:??:think:

Sorry, I don't really know of any environmental products, but http://www.thedailygreen.com has great tips for everyday living.

madametj
10-14-2007, 08:12 PM
I just bought 3 bento boxes for my girls lunches! :woohoo:

http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i25/hum39/Image708.jpg

figaro, i :heart: laptoplunches.com. i never actually bought their lunchbox, but i did stop using a paper bag everyday, and i'm eating nearly wasteless lunches everyday!:cheering:

Jan in CA
10-15-2007, 01:15 AM
Compost bins.. :think: I don't know, but I'm sure someone will. Have you searched on Google yet?

madametj
10-15-2007, 07:24 PM
Compost bins.. :think: I don't know, but I'm sure someone will. Have you searched on Google yet?

yes, i've look online, but all i've seen are hundreds of dollars with a hefty shipping charge slapped on 'em. I'm pretty much just wondering if any well recognized stores (Home Depot for example) have them.

stirsmommy
10-15-2007, 07:53 PM
Home Depot guys or any nursery should be able to tell you how to make one. I know my dad has made several that range anywhere from easy to the kind that you turn a handle and it flips the bin for you to mix it up I guess.

madametj
10-16-2007, 07:45 PM
Home Depot guys or any nursery should be able to tell you how to make one. I know my dad has made several that range anywhere from easy to the kind that you turn a handle and it flips the bin for you to mix it up I guess.

great i'll ask when i get the chance.

some bins turn in order to get more oxygen throught the pile so that it decomposes faster.

mommie*3
11-14-2007, 08:22 PM
I love the Seventh Generation diapers and wipes. The diapers run small but they work great. I buy them online at 1800diapers.com.

Jan in CA
11-14-2007, 08:56 PM
I tried Simple Green for bathroom cleaning, but unfortunately it doesn't do much to soap scum, etc. I'll have to check out the Seventh Generation products if I can find them.

Orangey
11-15-2007, 04:08 AM
Jan, Babies R Us has started carrying Seventh Generation and also Whole Foods and Henry's.

VictoiseC
11-15-2007, 10:52 AM
Great topic Jan! Well, this is my problem: I really want to switch over to carrying my own bag to the grocery store because of all the deaths being caused by plastic (birds etc) but, we can't figure out what we will put our trash into because that's what we use. When we're in the country we compost but we can't in the city... but there's still bottles and stuff that have to be put in plastic.

I didn't see an answer to your question. Think I'll google it. (about garbage bags)

Appreciate all the other tips esp those Chico bags! (thanks for the link)

VictoiseC
11-15-2007, 10:54 AM
Well I found this but it's kind of hard to move into buying garbage bags when they're free.

http://www.thisnext.com/item/236FA521/637CB67A/BioBag-Biogradable-Trash-Bags


This is interesting too:

http://www.idealbite.com/tiplibrary/archives/our_trashiest_tip_yet

Jan in CA
11-15-2007, 01:50 PM
Thanks for the info, Orangey! I do shop at Henrys so I'll check there next time I go. Whole Foods isn't far either.

Vic, I know what you mean. Right now I already buy bags for the large trashcan in the kitchen, but I use store bags for the recycle bin. I figure that is okay though and a good use for them because I am recycling them. When my box of trashbags is gone I intend to buy something biodegradable though.

I think these were listed elsewhere in this thread, but I'll post them here, too. These are the ones I have bookmarked.
http://www.seventhgen.com/index.php
http://www.1000bulbs.com/Screw-In-Compact-Fluorescents/
http://www.greenerchoices.org/
http://www.ecover.com/us/en/Products/Laundry/20050707+Fabric+Softener+USA.htm
http://www.reusablebags.com/store/acme-workhorse-reusable-shopping-p-42.html

VictoiseC
11-15-2007, 05:47 PM
Thanks Jan for the links! That's so funny, right after posting here we went to lunch and the Whole Foods in the building where we ate were giving out green cloth bags. We got two... there was a big line of people, everybody grabbing 'em.

Miley384
11-18-2007, 12:59 AM
I recycle whatever I can. Paper, cans, and even yarn! :happydance: When I finish a project I use that extra yarn for another project like scarfs. In the end, all of that yarn goes to good use!:)

knitncook
11-25-2007, 11:19 AM
I thought I'd ask here rather than start a new thread. Does anyone have a good natural commercial shampoo and conditioner that does not contain tea tree oil? I tried the Jason's, but forgot that I was allergic to tea tree oil. It made my scalp break out in hives! I'm having so many problems with regular shampoos and am having some sort of allergic reaction to something in the shampoos. My head just itches all the time. I thought at first I had gotten lice, but after relentless searching and combing that isn't the case. I quit using hair spray and hair gels a couple of years ago because they really made my scalp itch and now I can't find a shampoo that doesn't drive me batty.

What do you use. I saw there were some suggestions to making your own and I would as a last resort, but would muc prefer to purchase something already made.

Jan in CA
11-25-2007, 02:17 PM
I saw shampoo at Henrys the other day, but I didn't take it down to read the ingredients. I'll keep my eyes open when I'm out.

Is baby shampoo a problem, too?

brendajos
11-25-2007, 07:23 PM
I am liking this website too. http://www.greenfeet.com/ They have the chico bags 5 for $20 and they have a deal right now where if you spend $75 or more on any thing in the store, you get to pick a present worth up to $20.

Method brand has a soap scum cleaner that seems to work pretty well.

I found biodegradable garbage bags not long ago... i need to go find them again. Will try to look tonight. ;-)

btw... i am absolutely in LOVE with Ecover's fabric softener. it smells so delicious. Their stain stick, though, is NOT color fast. I am not sure how long it takes but i put it on a spot on an off white shirt and let it sit for a few days until i washed it. the spot came out VERY clear... the rest of the shirt is a darker off white though...lol.

Jan in CA
11-25-2007, 09:41 PM
Good to know about Method. I am trying Seventh Generation shower cleaner and I'm not sure it's cleaning soapscum all that well. I'll continue with it for now, but I'll try Method, too. They have a lot of products in Target.

brendajos
11-26-2007, 01:15 AM
Ah yes, here it is (http://tinyurl.com/2fxq9h). Bio Bag.
BioBag tall kitchen bags are 100% biodegradable and 100% compostable. They contain no polyethylene-based ingredients and are fully certified by the US Composting Council and the International Biodegradable Products Institute (BPI). Much like paper towels, BioBags are shelf stable yet biodegrade quickly when exposed to nature's elements and micro-organisms leaving behind no harmful residues. Certified under ASTM D6400-99 and OK Compost. Each .66 mil. bag measures 24 in. wide by 28 in. high.

They have a couple of other options on that page too. I am sure there are other place you can buy them as well. This was just the shop where I found them.

boyforpele13
11-30-2007, 12:48 PM
what an awesome thread!

I only made it through 6 pages so far so if these have been repeated somewhere, forgive me.

I LOVE Heather's All Purpose Soap (http://www.heathersnaturals.com/products/index.php). I dilute and put into spray bottles and the stuff lasts FOREVER. I use it on my tile floors, cabinets, hamster accessories, desk, really everywhere, and I adore it. It smells great too. I have also used the oxygen cleanser and window cleaner and i was pleased with those also.

seventh generation has been mentioned a bit already and thankfully, it is becoming more readily available to me at local markets, so i've been using the dishwashing liquid.

also readily available at Target and CVS near me is method http://www.methodhome.com/ who makes a full line of home care products, all cruelty free and plant derived ingredients, no chemicals and speaking of environmentally friendly, they have a promotion for a free canvas tote with $20 purchase here (http://www.givegreener.com/). i have used their hand soap, tub and tile cleaner, detergent, fabric softener, fragrances, and I can't think what else right now, but i LOVE them.

and speaking of canvas bags all of the markets here, even some of the smaller health food stores, are now offering very inexpensive canvas grocery bags, for around $1 typically, and i am LOVING them. i forget them a lot, though, in which case i use paper because i always find a way to reuse paper efficiently. the best ones are from Sweetbay/Hannaford, IMO anyway as they fold up and snap shut in a cute little rectangle that fits in my shorts pocket. and it's HUGE. i use them for traveling too, they're awesome and multifunctional. :)

and let's see.... natural spider prevention: essential citrus oils, orange, grapefruit, etc. but make sure it's an essential not a fragrance. be careful, though, about potential contact with pets/skin as essentials can be an irritant. place a few drops near windowsills/entryways where spiders can enter or place a few drops on a cottonball.

freshen your vacuum: essential lemon oil on a cottonball placed inside your vaccuum cleaner bag or bagless container makes for an all natural antibacterial /antiviral that also leaves the air smelling fresh and clean.

borax placed in inconspicuous (and safe) areas of kitchen counters will eliminate roach problems. borax rocks all around.

diotomaceous earth can be used both in your yard and in your home to kill and prevent fleas. make sure to get food grade, not the kind at the pool store, though, in case of ingestion secondary to contact occurs, either you or pets. it is safe to eat, actually has health benefits! for outside, place in an empty coffee can making small holes in the lid for a pseuo-shaker effect, and sprinkle throughout the yard. due to the flea's life cycle, this isn't an instant fix, but it's worth the short wait to avoid using poison. in your home, use a similarly fashioned pseudo-shaker and mix with salt, borax, and baking soda. sprinkle all over carpets, upholstery, etc. after 24 hours, use a broom to embed the mixture in. don't vacuum for a full 7 days. (most people hate that part, sorry!)

okay i'm totally babbling and some of this may have been addressed already, so i'm shutting up! wonderful thread, thanks to all!!!!!!

Jan in CA
11-30-2007, 03:10 PM
Thanks for all the great info, Sean! :thumbsup:

ETA: Where can I buy the Heather's products?

knitncook
12-10-2007, 03:00 PM
Not sure if this has been mentioned yet or not, but there is an organization called Catalog choice (http://www.catalogchoice.org)which allows you to opt out of catalogs you recieve. It isn't an all out "junk mail opt out" but just catalogs. I never realized how many catalogs I recieved until I started adding them to my opt out list. Criminy! That's a lot of paper I'm recycling each month (that I'd just as soon not get!) I just tried to add a new catalog to my list, but the server is acting up. So if you get a server error, try again later. It really is wonderful. They were talking about this on NPR a few weeks ago.

boyforpele13
12-10-2007, 03:46 PM
i feel like this may have been mentioned, but i can't find it. for the pet people reading, i found that there are several pet waste cleanup bags that are 100% biodegradeable. the brand that i found locally is Bags on Board (http://www.bagsonboard.com/)

of course pet waste is a great way to recycle those plastic grocery bags, too! i just don't grocery shop enough to keep up. :)

ETA: The package says they are 100% biodegradable *except* for by California regulations. I know they have very stringent environmental laws in place, but am not sure what makes these not okay.

Jan in CA
12-10-2007, 07:32 PM
I don't see any info about CA, but whatever. That's just silly. If they are biodegradable, they are biodegradable! Thanks for the info!

feminine_earth
12-27-2007, 04:51 PM
Hi Everyone! Just thought I'd share how I try to do my part (though there's MUCH more I need to be doing!) to help our Earth Mother. :aww:

First of all, we use only recycled toilet paper and paper towels. We buy them from our local Publix grocery store. Eventually, I would like to stop using paper towels altogether, but my husband likes to have them on hand.

We use Ecover Dish Soap to wash our dishes, which we buy at our local health food store (support small businesses!!). We also use Ecover Bleach instead of regular chlorine bleach. Ecover Bleach is just expensive peroxide, but shhh...don't tell my husband. :teehee:

To wash our laundry, we use Seventh Generation Laundry Soap, but honestly, this is (also) just to satisfy my husband! All you really need is some baking soda and vinegar! When I wash clothes, this is all I use, but the hubby thinks clothes need soap to get truly clean. A friend is sending me some soapnuts to try in the washing machine, and I've heard good things about them (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sapindus)!

Speaking of laundry, we do not own a clothes dryer! We hang all our clothes on a clothes line. "But Missy," you say, "you're in Florida! You can hang your clothes all year round! We can't do that up North!" Ah ha, but you can. When I lived in Ireland with my husband and his mom, they did not own a clothes dryer either. They hung their clothes on heaters or on a Clothes Horse (you can get clothes horses at Lowe's, Home Depot, Target, or really crappy ones at Wal-Mart).

To do our grocery shopping, I use the cloth Greenbags that my local Publix sells, and they are BIG and absolutely wonderful. However...I forget them all the time! This works in my husband's favor, though, because he is obsessive compulsive, and won't put food in the regular trash bag. He doesn't want it to get smelly...so he uses the grocery store plastic bags to put food in, ties them up, and THEN puts them in the regular kitchen trash. I don't like doing this, though, and when we move, I'm hoping to compost almost all leftover food and never use plastic bags from the grocery store again. :mrgreen:

Speaking of food...we try to buy mostly organic dairy and produce, free-range eggs, and natural meat grown without hormones and antibiotics (for my husband--I am a vegetarian). This not only helps our health, but helps our Earth Mother, as well.

I do not use shampoo! I use what I like to call Hair Soap bars from Chagrin Valley Soap (http://chagrinvalleysoapandcraft.com/), and I "condition" my hair with 1 tblsp. apple cider vinegar in 1 cup of water. Detergent is very harmful to hair (and to the environment!), and I cannot tell you all how much better my hair looks since switching to soap. I used to have frizzy hair and lots of split ends...my hair would be greasy a couple hours after I washed it!! Now, I haven't seen a split end in over a year, my hair is soft and shiny, and I can go two days without washing it before it gets greasy!

For the kitties, we use a biodegradable, scoopable, flushable cat litter called Swheat Scoop. It is awesome stuff made completely out of wheat, very low on dust, doesn't have that awful clay cat litter smell, and is very environmentally friendly! We buy it either at Publix, or Target, but I'm pretty sure you can also buy it online. We used to use Feline Pine (natural pine litter), and really liked it, but one of our cats wouldn't use it, so we had to switch to the wheat litter.

Someone mentioned Diatomaceous Earth, and I have to agree! We use it for fire ants outside, and also sprinkle it around the outside of our house to deter fleas and other bugs. It's good stuff, but it's getting harder and harder for us to find in the stores. :pout:

Oh, we do not use any spray air fresheners in the house. I burn essential oils in an Oil Burner, or put a few drops of my favorite essential oil in a bottle of distilled water, shake it up good, and spray it around the house. When we want to burn candles, we use only beeswax with 100% cotton wicks (no lead!). I buy all my essential oils and supplies from Mountain Rose Herbs (http://www.mountainroseherbs.com).

And finally, I use Cloth Menstrual Pads and my Diva Cup for my monthly bleeding. Cloth pads are wonderfully comfortable, easy to wash (I just soak mine in the bathroom sink and then throw them in the washer with the rest of the dirty clothes!), and last for a really long time. I make my own (lots of free patterns online!), and buy from Mimi's Dreams (http://www.saucytots.com/catalog.php?category=31). No yucky disposables taking up space in landfills! The Diva Cup (http://divacup.com/) is wonderful for those who don't want to be bothered washing pads, and who prefer internal protection. It's comfortable and convenient, though I prefer external protection most of the time. Another option is Sea Pearls (http://www.jadeandpearl.com/catalog/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=9&products_id=18) (or click here (http://www.seapearls.co.uk/) for a UK site), which are natural sea sponges. They offer another type of internal protection, but I have never tried them.

*********************************

When I look over this list, it looks like we do a lot...but honestly, we are so wasteful in other areas of our lives. :pout: We use lots of plastic zip lock baggies for storing food in the freezer, and regular plastic trash bags. We own two cars, as my husband and I work in different directions, and we use them a lot. They are little cars...used, and good on gas, but they are still polluting the environment. We spend WAY too much money on things we don't really need (namely, going out to dinner or sweets from the grocery store), and both my husband and I are in a REALLY bad habit of running the water while washing dishes! I also spend too much time on the computer while I could really be knitting or reading a book by candlelight!

My goal is to one day be completely self-sufficient...growing our own food and producing our own power (solar and windmills). I really wish I could completely get rid of both cars, but hubby won't have that. Maybe one day we can go electric. :mrgreen:

knitncook
12-27-2007, 08:25 PM
Question about Swheat cat litter: Does it clump? I see that you said it is scoopable, but does it clump? I hate regular clay litter because you can never get the wet litter all out and it eventually stinks. With clumping litter it is easy to just scoop and go.

brendajos
12-27-2007, 09:34 PM
I don't know this about that litter but she does say it is flushable and from my understanding you can't, or really really shouldn't, flush clumping cat litter as it will do a real mess to your pipes. :shrug:

Love that list of stuff though. I am excited to check that stuff out when I get home tonight. A lot of sites are blocked here at work so many of them don't come up. Will defniitely have to check it out when I get home! :happydance:

Oooh and I have a link for what I thought was a good deal for some 7th Generation products. It is $18 and you get a full size dish soap, Fabric Softner, Laundry Detergent, Garbage Bags, and Paper Towels. Got mine in the mail the other day and I was just giddy with delight. Comes with the tote bag in the picture too. :)

http://tinyurl.com/yurbox

feminine_earth
12-28-2007, 12:00 AM
Question about Swheat cat litter: Does it clump? I see that you said it is scoopable, but does it clump? I hate regular clay litter because you can never get the wet litter all out and it eventually stinks. With clumping litter it is easy to just scoop and go.
The clumping aspect of the litter is kind of hard to explain. It clumps, and it doesn't. If the kitty goes pee, and you try to scoop it right away, it is still wet, and will fall apart all over the place. So...what we do is let it dry for about 15 minutes, and THEN scoop it. By that time, it has formed a pee-pee pancake that is easy to scoop, falls apart once it hits the toilet water, and flushes down quite easily. :mrgreen:

The Feline Pine is different. It does not clump at all, but is flushable. However, the purpose of Feline Pine is not to scoop the pee. Liquid turns the pellets into powder, and the powder does not smell (I guess from the pine?). Once all the litter has been turned into powder, it's time to trash it, and fill up the pan again. I really liked the pine litter, but our cat George didn't like it because the pellets were too big. He's very spoiled. :nails:

Darcia
01-18-2008, 09:19 AM
We too use Method, Seventh Generation, and Simple green art first, it was hard because you'd have to go to specialty shops to buy earth friendly cleaners, and they were very expensive. But now one can find them in all major grocery stores. This is encouraging.

PEI is nick-named Canada's Green province, and that is not just from all the gorgeous rolling green fields. We are an island and must be conscious of where our garbage is going. We have the best garbage program I have ever seen in Canada. Compost, Recycling and garbage is all picked up at curbside. We sort and have it all ready on the day required. It is amazing how little actual garbage we have. Our bin takes over a month to fill.

I always struggled with what kind of diapers to choose. I ended up using disposable. :sad: But now both are potty trained so we are diaper free.

cds11
01-20-2008, 05:09 AM
I'm gonna have to second the use of the Diva Cup, and reusable menstrual pads mentioned by feminine_earth. I absolutely love my diva cup, I've had it for well over a year now (maybe even close to two?) and it's awesome, you only need to pack one or two things if you go on vacation and you're expecting your period.
Other than that, unfortunately, I do not do a lot for helping the earth... I use all my plastic bags for my garbage, I do recycle my paper, cardboard and empty bottles and cans... I haven't quite gotten myself into the biodegradable soaps and stuff (I'm still a student, so I have to watch my money a bit, and usually it appears that anything good for the earth costs more money)

debb
01-20-2008, 07:48 PM
Here's a nifty idea for the craftsters among us

http://www.marthastewart.com/portal/site/mslo/menuitem.3a0656639de62ad593598e10d373a0a0/?vgnextoid=37b1b744dd165110VgnVCM1000003d370a0aRCR D&autonomy_kw=recycled%20t%20shirt&rsc=header_1

evona
01-29-2008, 01:50 AM
I use good ol' Dr. Bronner's http://www.drbronner.com/index.html religiously. I take it backpacking, use it for delicate laundry, wash my face with it, wash dishes with it etc. You can get Dr. Bronners at Whole Foods or any of their stores and Trader Joes. I also use Seventh Generation for regular laundry and dishwasher detergent. I use cloth bags for shopping for the most part and try to buy produce at Farmers Markets as often as possible. I still use plastic bags for trash but I recycle more and more of my refuse. I live in an apartment and I have no place to compost and no garden :^( Hopefully, I'll be moving on up within the next few years and I'll be able to do those things :^)

evona
01-29-2008, 02:00 AM
Oh - I also use Feline Pine for my kitties!!!! I use Natures Gate shampoo and conditioner. I haven't gone to cloth napkins yet, but I'm gearing up for it. My DS has been wanting me to. He also put up a clothes line so we are going to start hanging out our clothes to dry.

http://www.natures-gate.com/

Jan in CA
02-13-2008, 02:30 AM
CONSUMER REPORTS COMMENTS:

"Biodegradable" detergents. Seventh Generation Automatic Dishwashing Gel is said to break down in the environment. But the claim broke down when we found that the product contains a petroleum-derived agent that doesn't readily biodegrade. A spokeswoman said the company would remove the claim and review its product line and labeling. Biodegradability of two other detergents--Earth Friendly Product's Wave automatic dishwasher gel and Planet Ultra Dishwashing Liquid--was certified by reputable independent groups.

brendajos
02-15-2008, 04:11 PM
Just as an FYI- www.greenfeet.com (http://www.greenfeet.com) has a special going on right now for a free earthday chico bag with a $40 purchase. I love the chico bags and been holding off buying new ones for a while. This was a good enough excuse to buy some though. 10 bags is exactly $40 so that worked for me...lol.

You have to put the word ELECT in the comments section when placing an order. I don't know how long it is good for, I didn't see that anywhere in the newsletter, but I just got the e-mail yesterday.

Dangles
02-21-2008, 04:09 AM
Hi everyone,

I was sent this email and would like to pass it onto you all.

This is what Oxi clean is... 3% peroxide; did you Know that????This was written by Becky Ransey of Indiana

"I would like to tell you of the benefits of that plain little old bottle of 3% peroxide you can get for under $1.00 at an y drug store. My husband has been in the medical field for over 36 years, and most doctors don't tell you about peroxide, or they would lose thousands of dollars."

1. Take one capful (the little white cap that comes with the bottle) and hold in your mouth for 10 minutes daily, then spit it out (I do it when I bathe)

No more canker sores and your teeth will be whiter without expensive pastes. Use it instead of mouthwash (Small print says 'mouth wash and gargle' right on the bottle)

2. Let your toothbrushes soak in a cup of "Peroxide" to keep them free of germs.

3. Clean your counters, table tops with peroxide to kill germs and leave a fresh smell. Simply put a little on your dishrag when you wipe, or spray it on the counters.

4. After rinsing off your wooden cutting board, pour peroxide on it to kill salmonella and other bacteria.

5. I had fungus on my feet for years - until I sprayed a 50/50 mixture of peroxide and water on them (especially the toes) every night and let dry.

6. Soak any infections or cuts in 3% peroxide for five to ten minutes several times a day. My husband has seen gangrene that would not heal with any medicine, but was healed by soaking in peroxide.

7. Fill a spray bottle with a 50/50 mixture of peroxide and water and keep it in every bathroom to disinfect without harming your septic system like bleach or most other disinfectants will.

8. Tilt your head back and spray into nostrils with your 50/50 mixture whenever you have a cold, or plugged sinuses. It will bubble and help to kill the bacteria. Hold d for a few minutes then blow your nose into a tissue.

9. If you have a terrible toothache and cannot get to a dentist right away, put a capful of 3% peroxide into your mouth and
hold it for ten minutes several times a day. The pain will lessen greatly .

10. And of course, if you like a natural look to your hair, spray the 50/50 solution on your wet hair after a shower and comb it through. You will not have the peroxide burnt blonde hair like the hair dye packages, but more natural highlights if your hair is a light brown, reddish, or dirty blonde It also lightens gradually so it's not a drastic change.

11. Put half a bottle of peroxide in your bath to help rid boils, fungus, or other skin infections.

12. You can also add a cup of peroxide instead of bleach to a load of whites in your laundry to whiten them. If there is blood on clothing, pour directly on the soiled spot. Let it sit for a minute, then rub it and rinse with cold water. Repeat if necessary.

13. I use peroxide to clean my mirrors, and there is no smearing which is why I love it so much for this.

I could go on and on. It is a little brown bottle no home should
be without! With prices of most necessities rising, I'm glad there's a way to save tons of money in such a simple, healthy manner.

knitncook
02-21-2008, 02:24 PM
Please note that Snopes lists this letter as "mixed" in that there are some true and some false comments in this letter. H2O2 should never be swallowed and in high concentrations can cause more harm than cures.

knitncook
02-21-2008, 02:28 PM
I can't remember from reading through here and dont' feel like going back through all the messages :teehee: Is anyone else using their own cloth reusable menstrual pads? I've been thinking of making some wool "soakers" for my daughters who have much heavier flows being young with larger uteri (I had a large part of my uterus removed during my third and final c/s - long story) Anyway, I was thinking about making some felted soaker pads to go inside some of the pads. Anyone done this? There is a group at Ravelry devoted to cloth pads, but most of what I'm hearing on the knitting forefront is making the whole pad from wool. Uhm, maybe I'm more "sensitive" than others, but does anyone else go "ouch" when they read that?

KnittyLynn
02-22-2008, 07:52 PM
I'm going to check out the seventh generation site, the products sound great!
I make a cleaner from equal parts white vinegar and water with a bit of lemon juice that works well and I use baking soda as a cleaner too.:mrgreen:

KnittyLynn
02-22-2008, 07:57 PM
Hey!
great idea! peroxide for cleaning. I've used alcohol but it looks like peroxide has many more uses.

Jan in CA
02-23-2008, 02:39 PM
Knitncook - I don't remember either, but you can use the "search this thread" to find info about it if it's here.

sakura-panda
02-27-2008, 11:41 AM
Here is an interesting perspective on reusable grocery bags: Be careful on the Reusable Bags Bandwagon (http://www.fakeplasticfish.com/2007/08/be-careful-on-reusable-bags-bandwagon.html)

I will confess that we bought 10 bags from the grocery store -- 5 for each car -- and I have a fold up one from Target that I keep in my purse.

What I love about the grocery store bags is that they have a flat, sturdy bottom and seem to be the same dimensions as paper bags -- they are strong, have handles and can carry more than those silly plastic bags, so that we also don't need as many of them.

(The Target bag is different -- its dimensions are more like the plastic Target bags -- but it folds up and zips into it's own pouch so it is very easy to keep with me.)

Here's a link (from that blog) for a site that has patterns for knitting/crocheting or otherwise making shopping bags: http://makeabag.blogspot.com/

knitncook
02-28-2008, 07:33 PM
I think the main point in the article is to consider what bags you already have at your disposal before purchasing trendy, cute bags with a large environmental footprint. We have 4 from our grocery store and 2 of the large Target ones that fold up (these hold a TON of groceries) We can get an entire week's worth of groceries for a family of 5 in those 6 bags. But we have others that we carry all over the place of other shopping. They range from the "free" bag you get with your Books-a-Million club membership to bags we've recieved as "gifts" for attending conferences and seminars to ones we've just picked up over the years. We have several good sturdy canvas bags that we got at the grocery store we used to shop at in Oregon and they must be 20 years old! Still have them. Still use them. They've been washed and reused SO many times. We joke about "the bag" because someone will ask me where something is and I'll say, "It's in 'the bag'" "which bag?" "The one with the red handles" "Which one with the red handles?" It goes on and on. Really the only reason that I even bought bags at my local grocery store was because my dh said he felt "weird" using other store bags without buying some first. So we bought more bags.

I will admit that I still use plastic grocery bags to bring my meat home in. There is just something icky about meat that I don't want it in my cloth bags. (yeah, it's something I have to get over living with all these omnivores).

princess
03-04-2008, 05:40 AM
i dont know if this has ever been posted on kh, but i find it to be a pretty good motivator to being more green :)

http://www.storyofstuff.com/index.html

Spikey
03-05-2008, 08:06 PM
Thanks, Katie. That was a very interesting perspective.

panchita
06-09-2008, 12:09 AM
Here's a nifty idea for the craftsters among us

http://www.marthastewart.com/portal/site/mslo/menuitem.3a0656639de62ad593598e10d373a0a0/?vgnextoid=37b1b744dd165110VgnVCM1000003d370a0aRCR D&autonomy_kw=recycled%20t%20shirt&rsc=header_1

I :heart: reusable bags.

I made two of these T-shirt bags out of my old college T-shirts. I was very sentimental about them and they had been in a box under the bed for *ahem* about ten years. I modified Martha's pattern so the front and back overlap and form a double layered bottom. The clerks at the stores I go to always comment on them.

I've also knit my own turkish string bags (http://tiajudy.com/stringbag.htm). I made one for my mom, sister, dbf's mom, sister-in-law, best friend, plus two for me... some hemp, some cotton. A checker once told me I should sell them, but each one takes about 8-10 hours. I get paid $40/hour for off-contract time at my work.. that's a $320-$400 bag. :) Fine for a gift, but not to sell. I don't think anyone would buy one


Other products:
I love my Sigg water bottle (http://www.mysigg.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=592). I used to have a Nalgene, but the number 7 plastic is the kind that is probably carcinogenic. The Sigg is aluminum, lightweight, and comes in many colors. I had a hard time finding one that was a 1.0L size locally (couldn't actually.. the news about carcinogenic plastic had just come out) so I bought online. My dbf has a Klean Kanteen (http://www.kleankanteen.com/) that he adores. he likes the wide mouth so he can put ice cubes in it. We reuse our old Nalgene bottles to mix up organic fertilizer from our local nursery with water to water our potted patio plants and veggies. I don't buy flats of water anymore.. yay! No more plastic.

I also have switched to either Natracare (http://www.natracare.com/products/the_natural_choice.htm)or Seventh Generation organic cotton tampons without applicator. I was very uncomfortable using them at first and would only use them if I was at home (the bathrooms at work have the sink outside the toilet room.. if you know what I mean). Now, I'm a pro and don't have any problems using them all the time. Way less waste than the plastic applicator ones I'd been using before.

I just bought some Biokleen (http://biokleenhome.com/products/household/laundry) laundry detergent. The citrus liquid is ULTRA concentrated.. I use a Tbsp in my front loader. I also have their dishwashing powder and am happy with it.

DBF and I do battle over eco-friendly vs. wallet friendly... so if I'm shopping, I'll spend a little extra to get the eco-friendly (I still only get it on sale) while he gets the cheapest kind available... no matter what. :gah: It makes me crazy! :hair:

Something I'm doing for my classroom is buying a class set of used tupperware tumblers off of ebay or at local thrift stores to use for juice. Parents often donate styrofoam cups, but even if it were paper, the wasted pile of cups for 30 seconds of juice is appalling. We'll see if it works. I might just start saving the containers from my yogurt if I can't get enough cups.

A lot of the other products I use are already listed by other contributors. Love this thread... thanks Jan!:muah:

Jan in CA
06-16-2008, 08:17 PM
I saw this site today and Time's best websites of 2008.
http://www.carbonrally.com/

I'm already doing various things to do my part, but will check this out more.

Being environmentally responsible is helpful whether you believe in climate change or not.

figaro
06-28-2008, 08:39 AM
Our older water died, it was about 12 years old and it just quit heating water. So I called up a plumber and it would cost about $1500 for one similar to the one that died, then I asked him about a Tankless Water heater. They do install them, I guess they are not that popular over here on the east coast. My husbands parents in Holland had to replace their tankless after 25 years back about 10 years ago so that gives you a idea of how long they have been around. I love it, it only heats the water when you need it, no more heating a 40 gallon tank all the time. And

Then there was half of our basement that desperatly needed to be painted and there are only 3 small windows down there. I saw a new paint called The Freshaire Choice (http://freshairechoice.com/), it has 0 VOCs which is great and a ton of other things, it is real a green choice. Even the paint chips are recyclable.

Jan in CA
06-28-2008, 10:44 AM
That's fabulous, Debbie!

Is your new tankless for the whole house? I know they make them for small areas like a bathroom or kitchen, but wasn't sure about the whole house. If it is does it heat quickly? Right now it takes what seems like forever to get hot water to the back bathroom or kitchen which really wastes water.

Also... does anyone have know about biodegradable trash bags? I bought some Bio-bags for the cat litter trash can, but the only small ones they have are intended for food waste and composting. They fit the can, but they allow heat and moisture to escape and really aren't ideal for my intended use. I can't flush the litter because of our low flow toilets so I need to use some type of bag.

figaro
06-28-2008, 12:49 PM
The tankless is for the whole house, it might take a minute or 2 for the water to get up to the top floor (it is in the basement) but I use that time to get my clothes and towel together. They did say that you can install something like a circulator on the pipes to get the water to you faster but we felt it was not a big deal.

kristaj
06-28-2008, 07:58 PM
I absolutely LOVE this thread! Thanks Jan! I've been on here for a good three hours reading all the wonderful ideas and linked sites, so I can't remember if anyone answered the question about CFL bulbs. After slowly replacing burned out bulbs with CFLs we now almost have a houseful of them. At first they bugged me a little (not bright enough, different color of light, etc.), but we are now used to them. The only one that took a little longer to get used to was the one in the bathroom. I had a harder time putting my makeup on, it seemed to change my skin tone. Now I don't have a bit of a problem with it and we are seeing a difference in our electric bill, too.:cheering:

Thanks to the suggestion for the Chagrin Valley soaps. Having dry, frizzy, naturally curly hair, I have never found a shampoo I am happy with. I also hate all the waste that plastic hair care bottles create. I can't wait for my order to come in. I also learned while I was on that site (for those with young children) that the tear free shampoos use an anesthetic chemical to make them tear free. Not something I really want going in my kid's eyes.

Tropicflower24
07-08-2008, 10:01 PM
Hmmm..... Being a green girl, I saw so many things I was like, OH I use this or that.... I should have written them all down.

Compost bins can be made with 4 pallets of the same size. These can be wired together and the air flow from the gaps actaully helps the process along.

I make reusable bags.

We buy raw milk.

We make our own detergents.

I recycle almost everything I can....

We grow our own food, pesticide free.

We raise our own animals for meat and by products (we are meat eaters, but this is so much more humane than slaughter houses.... But don't get me started on that one. :teehee:)

We use Jason hair products (for my mom and I who are caucasian.... I really don't know of any hair products for AA hair..... My sister is chocolate and there are a few things *better* than others...... But saying that some things are sorta organic/eco is like saying "the corn is organic, just not the pesticides on it.".... If anyone knows of anything for AA hair, let me know please! I do her hair myself, and I can do the stuff she needs.... cornrows, poofs (not sure what they are really called). I do use Abaya hair conditioner on her hair tho.)


We use Dr. Bronners.

I try to reuse shoes as much as possible..... And sometimes I just go barefoot. (Yes, I know that isn't the greatest choice.... And I have a cut in my foot right now to show for it)

We grow our own herbs.

We make our own kombucha and kefir (but I let our kefir die)

We buy locally.

Greenkarat.com has a really cool program for wedding rings.

We do a lot of other things, and I have some pretty interesting theories, but I will follow the rules and not get into that. :)

Tropicflower24
07-09-2008, 12:04 AM
Oh yeah..... We also use Bonded Logic recycled denim insulation and Fresh Air and Mythic paints.

Jan in CA
07-13-2008, 03:09 PM
I just tried a new cleaner for the tub/bathroom. It's called Green Works and I got it from Target. I love it!
http://www.greenworkscleaners.com/?WT.srch=1

auntcrafty
07-13-2008, 09:06 PM
I've gone eco-friendly & organic for purely selfish reasons -- I have allergies to sulfites, soy, and corn derivatives.

I've had great success with just using baking soda to clean with -- especially my fruits & veggies. I also use the Seventh Generation cleaning products.

Plastic & paper bags are a "no-no" so I carry my canvas bags and washable insulated bags with me everywhere. I found some fun bags at Wal-mart recently that are sort of a t-shirt material made out of organic cotton. I'm going to use one to carry my knitting around & the other for the beach because it's washable.

I am starting to use storage containers more, instead of zippered plastic bags & use a Pur filter pitcher for cooking. I still have to buy bottled water, because the city water is treated with corn derived products & buy bigger bottles to pour into my travel cups (the bottles have deposits when purchased & can be returned for $).

Feminine hygene products are almost all exposed to corn (corn starch dusted, fragrance, or the adhesive is corn derived), so my new best friend is a Diva (http://www.divacup.com/) cup. Love this because I have heavy periods and don't have to worry about leakage.

I use more dish towels instead of paper towels, have cut back on using one time use cups (take out at Starbucks -- but am going to invest in one of their insulated iced coffee cups), don't use paper plates, and only do full loads of laundry in cold water.

That's all I can think of.

Jan in CA
07-13-2008, 11:17 PM
I also use the Seventh Generation cleaning products.



I tried the shower cleaner and was not impressed. I found that the Green Works worked better for me. Can't say about the other products though.

That's great that you are doing so much. It helps both you and the planet!

I'm changing more and more things as I run out of old products I buy better ones. Green Works for instance. Plus I bought some Biobags (http://www.biodegradablestore.com/pp/bags/kitchen%20_compost/pp_bio_bags_3g_C_B.html) for the cat litter. I use the composting bags since they are the only ones they have that will fit a small trashcan. I feel better dumping it in the trash now knowing that the bag will biodegrade. :thumbsup:

auntcrafty
07-14-2008, 01:45 AM
I tried the shower cleaner and was not impressed. I found that the Green Works worked better for me. Can't say about the other products though.

That's great that you are doing so much. It helps both you and the planet!

I'm changing more and more things as I run out of old products I buy better ones. Green Works for instance. Plus I bought some Biobags (http://www.biodegradablestore.com/pp/bags/kitchen%20_compost/pp_bio_bags_3g_C_B.html) for the cat litter. I use the composting bags since they are the only ones they have that will fit a small trashcan. I feel better dumping it in the trash now knowing that the bag will biodegrade. :thumbsup:

The SG products aren't the best I have found, but the only ones I can use. I do get better results with baking soda & SG non-chlorine bleach (peroxide). Some of the other corn avoiders use potato vodka for disinfecting. Not sure that is cost effective or not.

My employers have used a pit method for disposing pet waste in the past, but with the kiddos & lava landscape, we can't really do that now.

Jan in CA
07-14-2008, 10:18 AM
You know, I had never looked at the composition of the Bio-bags and they are made from corn. Interesting. Not having many allergies I've never had to think about that, but it must be hard to have to deal with that!

Are you on the Big Island? I was there once and was amazed at how much lava there was!

auntcrafty
07-14-2008, 11:24 AM
I haven't seen it yet, but others have recommended the movie "Corn King" to show others how much corn is used. I'm hoping to rent it sometime.

I'm on Maui -- just arrived Saturday and am currently watching the sunrise & listening to the roosters make sure everyone is getting ready for work.

Jan in CA
07-14-2008, 11:47 AM
I just looked up the movie on Netflix and it's "King Corn". I put it on my list. ;)

I love Maui! We stayed in Kaanapali and Napili, but have visited other areas.

Tropicflower24
07-15-2008, 01:43 PM
Not sure where you stand on this, but Green works uses ethenol.

We also use Tom's of Maine products. (They've gone green!)

Jan in CA
07-15-2008, 02:04 PM
I think it's important for a product to work as well as as be as biodegradable as possible.

Greenworks are 99% petrochemical free which I feel is a good start and a much better alternative to the chemical loaded products. AND it works. ;) If I find something even better that works, I'll use that one for sure.
http://www.greenworkscleaners.com/products/definition.php

Tropicflower24
07-16-2008, 11:04 AM
LOL, yeah that is a plus!

Jan in CA
07-17-2008, 09:54 PM
I've used a Nalgene bottle for years, but am switching to stainless steel. I like patterns on the Sigg bottles (http://www.mysigg.com/), but these are cheaper and I like the message. ;)
http://www.projectearthh2o.com/products.htm

brendajos
07-17-2008, 10:43 PM
I love my ridiculous collection of Sigg bottles. (Yeah... do I need 4 of them?) If you are looking for something from Sigg, though, you need to find them online fast or at a store. Sigg has stopped supplying most internet retailers because their demand is so high, they can't keep up right now.

Jan in CA
07-18-2008, 12:41 PM
Yeah, I saw that. I can always get one of those later. ;)

brendajos
07-21-2008, 02:32 AM
sooo... I Craig's Listed all my wrapping paper recently. It was the only thing that was going to force my hand in getting rid of single use packaging. I had bought a bunch of fabric last year after christmas to make bags for this year. I haven't started on any of that fabric yet but I have some gifts that I am giving soon so I started playing the last few weeks. They are currently really simple, reversible bags but they MAY get more complex once I can actually sew a straight line. So here's the first set... The "nerds rock" fabric is my favorite, and as luck would have it, some of the gifts are for supah geeks! :teehee:

http://i5.photobucket.com/albums/y200/brendajos/Misc%20Craftiness/FirstBagset.jpg

Tropicflower24
07-21-2008, 10:26 AM
Oh yeah! That is really neat. I saw some fabric gift bags at Wal Mart awhile back, but I mean, who wants to buy from them??? I'll make some. THANK YOU for the great idea!!

Jan in CA
07-21-2008, 01:03 PM
Fabric bags for gift bags. I never would have thought about that! That's a good idea and those are really cool! Nice that they can use them again for something. :thumbsup:

I was also looking at some fun reusable bags that would make nice gift bags..sort of a gift within a gift! ;)

http://www.bangalla.com/grocerybagsntotes.php?gclid=CK2t4tK_z5QCFQwxiQodNw Kekg
http://www.reusablebags.com/store/shopping-bags-modern-totes-c-2_41.html

BTW - I know you can get those cheaper ones, but these are prettier for the gift bag idea. :teehee:

brendajos
07-21-2008, 10:44 PM
Fabric bags for gift bags. I never would have thought about that! That's a good idea and those are really cool! Nice that they can use them again for something. :thumbsup:

I was also looking at some fun reusable bags that would make nice gift bags..sort of a gift within a gift! ;)

http://www.bangalla.com/grocerybagsntotes.php?gclid=CK2t4tK_z5QCFQwxiQodNw Kekg
http://www.reusablebags.com/store/shopping-bags-modern-totes-c-2_41.html

BTW - I know you can get those cheaper ones, but these are prettier for the gift bag idea. :teehee:


Yeah I love those for gift bags too but I couldn't bring myself to spend that much on them I don't think... well for some gifts I could I suppose. I have used the Chico bags as gift bags too. They don't look as pretty but everybody who has gotten them has absolutely loved them. It makes me a little giddy that they actually "get it" too. :heart:

panchita
07-22-2008, 01:45 AM
sooo... I Craig's Listed all my wrapping paper recently. It was the only thing that was going to force my hand in getting rid of single use packaging. I had bought a bunch of fabric last year after christmas to make bags for this year. I haven't started on any of that fabric yet but I have some gifts that I am giving soon so I started playing the last few weeks. They are currently really simple, reversible bags but they MAY get more complex once I can actually sew a straight line. So here's the first set... The "nerds rock" fabric is my favorite, and as luck would have it, some of the gifts are for supah geeks! :teehee:




Love your bags... Did you have a pattern for them or did you just wing it?

I have a fine collection of paper gift bags that I save and re-use. My friends and I joke about who will get "the striped bag" next. I find them at thrift stores a lot, too. I've also taken to decorating and re-using coffee cans and other cylindrical containers with beads or ribbons and giving gifts in those... it's fun, crafty, and thoughtful. It's fun to find old tins or boxes at thrift stores or yard sales, clean them up, and use them to wrap, as well.

brendajos
07-22-2008, 02:37 AM
This pattern happened to be on my iGoogle page one day and I used it as the springboard to finally get started doing the bags. I have played with it a bit to move the draw string down a little further on the ones that have the little cuff. i have other patterns, just need to get them out and play with them. :)

http://www.wikihow.com/Sew-a-Reversible-Bag

kristaj
07-22-2008, 06:47 PM
What a wonderful idea. We too recycle our gift bags over and over again, but what a great way to add some variety to the bags we have been using for probably ten Christmases.

I also received my order from the Chagrin Valley Crafts (natural soaps and shampoos) that was put on this thread quite a while ago. I absolutely love them. I can't wait to try more of them and am ecstatic that we won't be using anymore plastic shampoo bottles :cheering: . It's also going to help greatly on our camping trip in Colorado next week. I have always hated packing bottles that can leak and now we have a solution.

Jan in CA
07-23-2008, 01:02 PM
Good news for people who loved their Nalgene bottles! They now have a new BPA free line that includes stainless!
http://www.nalgenechoice.com/index.html

Tropicflower24
07-23-2008, 02:39 PM
These are not organic, but they are all handcrafted...... I'm thinking that's greener than mass production, but I may be wrong.

http://swedefarmnaturals.com/index.html

This the site of a friend of mine. :)

brendajos
07-24-2008, 11:49 AM
The bags are on sale! Including some of the supah pretty ones. :)

http://www.reusablebags.com/store/specials-s.html

Jan in CA
07-24-2008, 05:37 PM
The bags are on sale! Including some of the supah pretty ones. :)

http://www.reusablebags.com/store/specials-s.html

Weeee! Thanks for telling me! I just ordered 4 sets of the Envirosax! One for me and 3 for Christmas gifts! :yay:

Jan in CA
08-01-2008, 01:31 PM
I got the bags and I love them!!! I hate that I have to wait till Christmas to use them or give them to my daughters. :teehee:

Tropicflower24
08-01-2008, 08:16 PM
:teehee:

figaro
08-07-2008, 07:41 PM
A while ago I asked about which clothesline people had (a T or umbrella style) and I finally bought one! I bought it from http://www.clotheslineshop.com/ and I just love it. We chose a umbrella for the compact size. It was so easy to install, you just shove the sleeve into the ground then slide it in and done. I have it right outside on the porch in the side of a small flower bed. It also comes with a cover to protect it. Here is a picture of it with my daughters clothes on it

(please ignore the greeness of the pool in the background, we are still trying to figure it out!)http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i25/hum39/275-1.jpg

Jan in CA
08-07-2008, 11:09 PM
Maybe the pool needs chlorine? :?? Looks like a great clothesline! Our yard is really small so I have a chain (literally) strung across the patio.

figaro
08-07-2008, 11:14 PM
I am learning that pools need more than just chlorine, I am taking a sample in to the local pool store tomorrow and they will let us know what we are doing wrong! Finally! ;)

Jan in CA
08-08-2008, 01:00 AM
I am learning that pools need more than just chlorine, I am taking a sample in to the local pool store tomorrow and they will let us know what we are doing wrong! Finally! ;)

Oh okay, I've never had a pool. That's a good idea to take a sample in.

MoniDew
09-19-2008, 12:38 PM
I bought several of the compact fluorescent light bulbs a while back. Supposed to last 7 times longer than regular light bulbs, use far less wattage, lower your power bills, etc.
I had one burn out the other day, in just about the same amount of time that a normal light bulb would have. Made me feel pretty ripped off. It's just the one, so far, but if I see any more burned out bulbs, I'm gonna be P'd.
By the way, I have also heard that these CF bulbs contain mercury, making disposal of them hazardous. Anyone else heard the same?
Is this a good way to be environmentally conscious or not?
________
Volcano Vaporizer (http://vaporizers.net/volcano-vaporizer)

Jan in CA
09-19-2008, 03:13 PM
Nothing is perfect all the time. I have to say though that mine have lasted a really long time so far. I have several and I don't think I've replace more than one and it's been many months.

Yeah, they do contain mercury and I wondered the same thing. I guess they can't be tossed in the trash when the go bad. I should look that up.. I'll be back if I find something.

debb
09-19-2008, 03:23 PM
the most recent issue of consumer reports is a 'green' issue. they did address this, I'll see if there is a portion i can post when I get a chance.

Jan in CA
09-19-2008, 04:20 PM
I just found an excellent article on CFL's! It also gives info one what to do with them.
http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/promotions/change_light/downloads/Fact_Sheet_Mercury.pdf

Here is some more info.
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/hazard/wastetypes/universal/lamps/index.htm

panchita
09-19-2008, 11:03 PM
I
I have also heard that these CF bulbs contain mercury, making disposal of them hazardous. Anyone else heard the same?
Is this a good way to be environmentally conscious or not?

It is true. You can't throw them in the trash. You must take them to the hazardous waste/household toxics roundup. It's a pain in the patootie. If they break on the floor, you're supposed to evacuate the room, open windows, sweep with stiff cardboard into a zip bag, pick up the residue with duct tape (no brooms allowed) and put that into the zip bag, too. Mercury is toxic, so it's not to go into the landfill.

I wish this info were printed larger on the CFL packaging.

Plus, they're all made in China and shipped to the USA.

I have them in all my lamps and light fixtures. :doh:

Jan in CA
09-20-2008, 01:40 AM
Fortunately it's a good thing they last a long time.

panchita
09-20-2008, 12:48 PM
Fortunately it's a good thing they last a long time.

I'm hoping that by the time most folks' bulbs are burning out there will be easy recycling available at grocery stores, hardware stores, etc.... everywhere... and people won't have to put them in the trash.

I did click on your link, Jan, and I do see the benefit to the environment because of less mercury contamination due to less coal powered electricity.

It's hard to have the mercury contamination possibly coming from one's home rather than being farther removed at an coal powered electric plant. I guess it makes us more aware of our impact on the environment... supposing one actually knows there is mercury in the bulbs.

sue in canada
09-20-2008, 04:33 PM
If anyone lives near an Ikea, they have boxes for the return of the light bulbs, also batteries. I am in Canada but I assume that Ikea in USA would do the same.

On a side note, years ago we used to play with mercury in school in science class and it was great fun if a thermometer broke.

panchita
09-20-2008, 10:09 PM
If anyone lives near an Ikea, they have boxes for the return of the light bulbs, also batteries. I am in Canada but I assume that Ikea in USA would do the same.

That is good to know. I'm over an hour from an IKEA, but it's still good info.


On a side note, years ago we used to play with mercury in school in science class and it was great fun if a thermometer broke.

I played with it when I was a kid, too. My mom has a little vial of it in her jewelry box that her father had given her. I think it had been some kind of machine lubricant? It's very cool stuff. Too bad it's so toxic... lol.

Jan in CA
01-22-2009, 02:03 PM
Just wanted to let anyone who cares know that my daughters and I all absolutely love our Envirosax (http://www.reusablebags.com/store/advanced_search_result.php?search_in_description=0&q=envirosax) reusable bags! They are beautiful and they hold a lot of stuff. They also fold up really small so it's easy to toss one in your purse or coat pocket. I keep the whole set in my car for easy access, too. I highly recommend them! :thumbsup:

Oh, I got us the Mikado set. :yay:

auntcrafty
01-23-2009, 10:10 PM
Just wanted to let anyone who cares know that my daughters and I all absolutely love our Envirosax (http://www.reusablebags.com/store/advanced_search_result.php?search_in_description=0&q=envirosax) reusable bags! They are beautiful and they hold a lot of stuff. They also fold up really small so it's easy to toss one in your purse or coat pocket. I keep the whole set in my car for easy access, too. I highly recommend them! :thumbsup:

Oh, I got us the Mikado set. :yay:
Think it's tacky to get these for my boss for Mother's Day? The county where we live has passed a no plastic bag law to go into affect I think in 2010 & I thought this might help her get ready.

Jan in CA
01-24-2009, 03:46 PM
Think it's tacky to get these for my boss for Mother's Day? The county where we live has passed a no plastic bag law to go into affect I think in 2010 & I thought this might help her get ready.

Not at all! These would make a beautiful gift! I know you can get a lot of bags in stores now cheaper, but for gifts these are great. :thumbsup:

I wish our county would outlaw plastic!

newbieknit
01-25-2009, 04:28 PM
:grphug:

This topic is going to make me go broke! Aside from knitting my passion is being environmentally friendly, and it doesn't have to cost an arm and a leg to do so... unless you're like me and you can't get enough cool things people show you. :whistle:

I use all Method products (http://www.methodhome.com/). Love their cleaning products for wood, stainless, all purpose. They have free and clear cleaners for those of us who are allergic to everything. Their floor cleaner set up is wonderful. Hand soaps are wonderful. I could honestly go on and on about their products.

Kat

themonkeygirl
05-18-2009, 01:49 PM
I am a BIG fan of www.reusablebags.com (http://www.reusablebags.com). I buy from them all the time and when I give a gift I always include a reusable bag in the package if I remember.
I absolutely love my Acme bags from reusablebags.com (http://www.reusablebags.com/)!!
We use tons of concetrated household products from Melaleuca (http://www.melaleuca.com/ps/), all are non-caustic and made from nothing harmful.

Jan in CA
05-18-2009, 02:16 PM
We use tons of concetrated household products from Melaleuca (http://www.melaleuca.com/ps/), all are non-caustic and made from nothing harmful.

Your link went to your business site for some reason. I changed it so it went to the Melaleuca product site.

BettyLuvs2Knit
08-26-2009, 01:26 AM
When my daughter was 2 years old she got these nasty red, dry, splotches behind her knees and on her legs. The doctors were all to informative about it and weren't really helpful with it either.

I found Melaleuca (http://www.melaleuca.com) just by browsing around on my own.

I can tell you what a miracle company they are. Not only did the lotion ReNew (http://www.melaleuca.com/ProductStore/Product.aspx?sku=3600) work miracles on her skin. I also read that changing the way the house was being cleaned: eliminating aerosols, and caustic and toxic chemicals- along with what the clothing was being washed in made a HUGE difference in her skin condition.

So I would say HANDS DOWN that Melaleuca is quiet possibly THE BEST around when it comes to environmentally friendly. Not only are the products free of all that harmful stuff they clean brillantly! And to top it all off, they come in concentrated form and you use water from your own house to dilute them. (Didn't know you were paying for water when you bought them from the store did ya? Ya, even Seventh Generation has you paying for water. Man, that's some expensive water!!!!)

Go check them out, and see for yourself. You only live once. Why would you be skeptical of something that is so natural... and economically sound? These days we need both!

I'm not a salesperson for them, but I am not shy about what they have done to help control my daughter's skin condition and to help keep my family healthy and well.

We all LOVE Melaleuca!!!!

:muah: :woohoo: :yay:

tofuxx
10-08-2010, 11:06 AM
i love using my ecotools make up brushes. theyre super soft and affordable. (about $12 for a set of 5) i use them pretty much everyday :)

panchita
10-08-2010, 10:38 PM
i love using my ecotools make up brushes. theyre super soft and affordable. (about $12 for a set of 5) i use them pretty much everyday :)

I have them, too, but don't use make-up much. I do love them, though!

Microwench
02-22-2011, 01:08 PM
I love anything by Mrs Meyers!!

http://www.mrsmeyers.com/

My favorites are the countertop spray and the surface scrub, both in lavender.

I have to admit, I started using these for purely selfish reasons. I am super sensitive to chemicals, the smell gives me an instant headache and I break out something horrid!

These work very well, smell awesome, and are nice on your skin!

boyforpele13
02-22-2011, 11:33 PM
I fell in love with Ms. Meyers too!!! One of the things I really love is that all of the products are available in each scent line so you can have "matching" scents throughout your home, I really dig that a lot. Rockin the Lemon Verbena at the moment. :)

Another cool thing is their products seem to be becoming available in "mainstream" stores, like the nicer grocery store chain in my area, so I don't have to make special trips anywhere.

bambi
07-16-2011, 10:38 PM
Cleaning:

I like using swiffer products but we are moving to Switzerland and I wasn't sure about the availability of the covers so after an internet search I found out that there are lots of knitting patterns on Ravelry for swiffer mop and duster covers. I also found sewing patterns for the same!

I found on a video on youtube of how to refill those bottles for the swiffer, too.

fatoldladyinpjs
07-17-2011, 10:55 PM
On the compact light bulbs, yes they work great. They use a fraction of the energy the old light bulbs did. I didn't notice any difference in the amount of light. I have a lamp we use every night. I was replacing bulbs every two months. The compact bulb lasted two years. The second one in my lamp is about two years old now and still going strong.

Spraying undiluted white vinegar around doorways and in front of attached garages keeps ants out of the house. I spray once a week and more often when it rains. My son used this successfully at his restaurant, since they can't use chemical sprays around the food. It's great around children and pets.

Lamers Dairy (Dairyland's Best) in our local area offers milk in half gallon glass milk containers like the kind we used to get in the 1950's and 60's. You pay a deposit and bring them back when you're finished.

My sons leave the cars home and drive a motorcycle and moped. They get around 100-150 miles per gallon of gas.

fatoldladyinpjs
07-17-2011, 11:48 PM
One of my favorites is Mr Clean Magic Erasers. They don't have any chemicals in them. You use your own cleaners. They're great for getting soap scum out of bathroom sinks and a great alternative to harsh powders like Comet that leave a residue behind.

http://www.mrclean.com/en_US/magic-eraser.do

fatoldladyinpjs
07-18-2011, 09:07 AM
Slow growing grass that needs little mowing.
http://money.cnn.com/2011/07/07/smallbusiness/pearls_premium_grass/index.htm?iid=EAL

Kit to teach your cat to use the toilet and stop using litter.
http://money.cnn.com/2011/07/18/smallbusiness/cat_toilet/index.htm?ncid=webmail

Hsiaokuo62
02-29-2012, 03:49 PM
I hate "super glue" since I always glue my fingers together, and I am sure it is terribly toxic for the environment.

Anybody have any ideas for good glue for yarn projects that require something stuck onto plastic? I am making index file boxes decorated with crochet flowers and wrapped in yarn - sort of like those "yarn mobbing" things. :eyes:

Hsiaokuo62
02-29-2012, 03:59 PM
Unfortunately compact light bulbs have been linked to problems for people who have autoimmune diseases or other issues.
http://www2.canada.com/health/doctor+compact+fluorescent+bulbs+pose+risks+autoim mune+disease+sufferers/4299565/story.html?id=4299565