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Lady Violet
08-15-2007, 04:35 PM
i was just reading one of the old threads and discovered that alpaca is supposed to be a good substitute for wool with people who have wool allergies. (hypo-allergenic) i want to knit something for my grandmother for christmas (probably lace), but she can't wear wool and other similar fibers. i think her skin is just really sensitive to it, but i'm thinking she also has a problem with the actual fibers. she has a real sensitivity to things in the air. i seem to remember her saying something to the effect that the loose fibers get up her nose (or something like that). would alpaca have the same problem, or are the fibers more compact?

LoAnnie
08-15-2007, 05:42 PM
Well, if I'm not mistaken. She could still have a problem with it, if it's an allergy. I would definitly stay away from the brushed alpaca, from what you've said. It's very fuzzy like mohair. I would buy one skien to make something small for her first and see how she reacts to it. If it bothers her, then you haven't spent tons of time and money on something she can't use. Alpaca can be very expensive. Hope this helped.

LoAnnie

Ingrid
08-15-2007, 06:35 PM
I love alpaca, but I can't tell you how many times I've pulled fibers out of my eyes when knitting with it.

Lady Violet
08-15-2007, 06:45 PM
I love alpaca, but I can't tell you how many times I've pulled fibers out of my eyes when knitting with it.

bummer. that's exactly the thing that would keep it from working. any suggestions on non-animal fibers that i could use instead? how about specific yarns?

Lady Violet
08-15-2007, 06:47 PM
Well, if I'm not mistaken. She could still have a problem with it, if it's an allergy. I would definitly stay away from the brushed alpaca, from what you've said. It's very fuzzy like mohair. I would buy one skien to make something small for her first and see how she reacts to it. If it bothers her, then you haven't spent tons of time and money on something she can't use. Alpaca can be very expensive. Hope this helped.

LoAnnie

instead of risking it, i could make something for myself and then see if she would like something similar. that way nobody loses out! :teehee:

Ingrid
08-15-2007, 06:48 PM
How about silk or bamboo?

Silver
08-15-2007, 06:51 PM
Silk's a good idea. The fibers are very long, so they do not fluff up and fly away. But a lace weight silk anything would be really luxurious!

Lady Violet
08-15-2007, 06:59 PM
silk sounds perfect! :yay:
i only have one lys near me, and it's not really that convenient to get to. my only other options are the big chains. last time i was at michaels i got to *fondle* the new bamboo they're now carrying. that felt really good and soft. i also got to break in a friend of mine with her first trip ever to a lys. i don't remember if they had any 100% silk (i fondled a lot, so it's hard to remember what it all was :teehee:), but what they did have that had silk in it was extremely soft and, well, silky. so if 100% silk is any softer than that 100% bamboo, i'm completely sold. thanks everybody!!! :hug:
:woohoo:

ashley b
08-15-2007, 07:40 PM
I read online that bamboo is supposed to be hypo-allergenic..although.. it probably depends on the brand and the specific amount of bamboo..i think the one i was looking at was 70-80% bamboo or something like that..anyway..its really nice and soft ...maybe you could try something like that?

Wahlee
08-15-2007, 10:40 PM
If you want some really cheap silk yarn, go to Colourmart.com. Their prices can't be beat.

dreamsherl
08-15-2007, 10:50 PM
I have wool allergies also. My LYS owner suggested that I hold skeins to my chest to see if I react. (now don't do this without permission besides it usually burns my hands if it's too wooly) I don't react to all wools. The superwash wools and alpacha agree with me. I'm also knitting a CPH for my DD with virgin lambs wool without a problem. I would test different yarns if it won't harm her.:think: