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scout52
08-16-2007, 11:36 PM
So i went to get my oil change and i was knitting while i was waiting. They have a tv in the waiting room which is nice. So i'm watching sharkweek while i'm working on my baby blanket and all the mechanics proceed to come out and look at my blanket. They are like wow you can make that. I've always wanted to learn how to knit but leaning close to me and whispering so the other guys doesn't hear "i'm a guy so you what guy knits". They then tell me about so and so knitted them this and they loved it. and how they loved the blanket that i was making. and if they thought they could learn. I'm like you can fix a car of course you can learn. It was so funny they would each wait until the other would walk away and then come talk to me. they each thought the last guy was flirting but they each asked about my knitting. LOLOLOLOL ironically there is a LYS 2 blocks from there so i told them to go there since i knew neither of them would actually sit down right then and there so i could show them how.

too funny how they each hid from each other the fact that they wanted to learn. they all said it looked so relaxing. so i told them to head to the LYS and to start on a scarf.

dakatzmeow
08-16-2007, 11:50 PM
very cool

redheadrachel
08-17-2007, 01:29 AM
Awesome!! I'm a big fan of knitting evangelism :happydance: Rock on!

Rhea
08-17-2007, 01:35 AM
That's totally cool.

I love boys!!
*G*

MaleKnitter
08-17-2007, 01:37 AM
well, I am a guy who knits and I love it, it's one of the things I can see myself doing my entire life. I havent told many in my town (some of the girls know) but it's a pretty redneck town (i was not born here b.t.w.), and i dont think that their reaction would be very nice, but I would not deny it if they asked me

blueeyes28
08-17-2007, 06:54 AM
I was thinking of giving some knitting lessons in my home this winter to supplement our income and at first I was thinking of offering mother/ daughter classes but then I thought why not parent/child classes I would love to be responsible for teaching some men/boys knitting plus I think it is a great way to find some quality time and common ground with our children.What do you guys think?

BostonBecca
08-17-2007, 07:28 AM
My boyfriend knits (as many of you know). I think one of the selling points for getting men to knit, for men you already know, is that you are not teaching them how to knit, but about a hobby you enjoy. That way, they can say it is for you they are learning this if they get their masculinity questioned.

Personally, I think we need to get over the whole male/female hobby thing and all just do what we enjoy without having to put people down for doing something they love.

GardenGirlKnitsToo
08-17-2007, 08:25 AM
I've been trying to convince a friend of mine that he should learn to knit. I think he would really enjoy it, but since he sees it as somehow less than macho, he won't even consider it. If anyone has any tips for combating this irrational fear of his, I'd love to hear them!

SusanMarie1956
08-17-2007, 09:00 AM
I think is neat!

Guys in te NAvy had to knit in the 30's I THINK. ;-) There are about 3 patterns on the web that they made. They all had to make the very same tihng so it was all alike.

Susan

scubasinger
08-17-2007, 09:50 AM
And I'll insert my usual rant at this point....(grin!)

I think one of the barriers to guys knitting is the lack of decent patterns. In most pattern collections, the male stuff seems to be almost an afterthought. There are some specialized books, true, but VERY few compared to patterns for women.

And some of the male patterns are described as patterns for women to knit for 'their man'. As in the book, "Never Knit Your Man a Sweater..." It's a collection of male patterns, but the assumption is that it's a woman reading the book. Totally overlooked is the concept that a man might like to knit a sweater for himself.

Or note the pictures in knitting magazines or catalogs. How many men do you see as creators/producers of the various items vs. recipients? How masculine are the advertisements?

Even on this board I've occasionally seen comments like "What do you think, ladies?" or "I need some help, girls" And I realize it isn't deliberate, but it still points out that automatically, reflexively, knitting is thought of as something for women.

All of this just kinda adds up to a 'this just really isn't a boy thing' message.

I've received a TON of welcome and help on this board and I LOVE this community. And I LOVE knitting. I just wish sometimes that I didn't have to look so hard to find a sock pattern and yarn that works well with a business suit!

Vic (as in Victor, as in 'somewhat frustrated boy knitter')

the rant is now over...you may return to your regularly scheduled knitting (grin!)

Jan in CA
08-17-2007, 10:15 AM
Scubasinger...I don't think it's the lack of patterns that cause men not to knit, I think it's the other way around. If more men knit and were open about it book writers and publishers would be all over it as a new market.

I think the reason most men don't want to knit or knit openly is because they still perceive it as a "girly thing" or a woman's hobby. It's the macho thing.

I think that's a great idea, Blueeyes!

That's so funny, Scout! I hope they do go to the LYS to check it out. ;)

scout52
08-17-2007, 03:14 PM
I'm am an Emphatic Evangelistic Knitter. I may have convinced one of the guys at work to learn to knit again. apparantly his grandmother had taught as a child. we both have a shared interest in martial arts so he was surprised to find out that i had knitted as well.

to the male knitters how did you get started?

here is a link to the sweater I made my boyfriend. he really liked it.

http://www.helloyarn.com/cyclingaran.htm

I had ordered a bunch of interweave knits along with the fall issue and now i can't remember which issue and a really nice sweater that i was going to make my brother that he could wear to work at very stuffy lehman brothers. are we allowed to share patterns here from magazines? if so I will scan it in and pm it you any of the male knitters here.

kemp
08-17-2007, 03:32 PM
Good point about the "ladies" and "girls" references...you'd think women would be a little more sensitive about being "sexist"...I know it's not intentional at all. I'm just as likely to say "what do you guys think" when addresssing women so maybe it's just tendency in speech more than it is anyone meaning to leave anyone else out.

Speaking from a designer stand point...I would love to do more stuff for men, but my model (my husband) is 6' 4" and it takes forever to knit stuff that big :roflhard: I'm not tiny but it's much easier to design for me.
And I'll insert my usual rant at this point....(grin!)

I think one of the barriers to guys knitting is the lack of decent patterns. In most pattern collections, the male stuff seems to be almost an afterthought. There are some specialized books, true, but VERY few compared to patterns for women.

And some of the male patterns are described as patterns for women to knit for 'their man'. As in the book, "Never Knit Your Man a Sweater..." It's a collection of male patterns, but the assumption is that it's a woman reading the book. Totally overlooked is the concept that a man might like to knit a sweater for himself.

Or note the pictures in knitting magazines or catalogs. How many men do you see as creators/producers of the various items vs. recipients? How masculine are the advertisements?

Even on this board I've occasionally seen comments like "What do you think, ladies?" or "I need some help, girls" And I realize it isn't deliberate, but it still points out that automatically, reflexively, knitting is thought of as something for women.

All of this just kinda adds up to a 'this just really isn't a boy thing' message.

I've received a TON of welcome and help on this board and I LOVE this community. And I LOVE knitting. I just wish sometimes that I didn't have to look so hard to find a sock pattern and yarn that works well with a business suit!

Vic (as in Victor, as in 'somewhat frustrated boy knitter')

the rant is now over...you may return to your regularly scheduled knitting (grin!)

suecq
08-17-2007, 03:47 PM
My 15 year old son knits amd he is not afraid to tell his peers. He uses his knitting as a magnet for girls as he knits very nice scarves for them. He usually has a waiting list of girls that want one. Of course the girl he happens to be dating has first dibbs on his creation.

Rorshach
08-17-2007, 05:29 PM
Jan, I would agree with you. Though personally, I think since there is a lack of male-oriented patterns out there, I do think that the guys should get together and start writing patterns. Yeah, that's a bit harder, but on the other hand, if they do most, if not all, the design work, then knit it up. I think the whole process would be a bit more in tune with the way most guys think.

For example, my dad's a woodworker. Anytime he wants something made, it has to be to his exact specs, so he'll design it himself, then he'll go out and build it.

Though thinking back on it, I think it's more about being seen playing with string and a couple of sticks and about learning patience. Just my 2 cents.

BillSpace
08-17-2007, 07:24 PM
I too bemoan the lack of good patterns for men. But then I think that men's clothing choices in general are more circumscribed. Pants, shirt, sweaters, jackets. That's about it for menswear. The world of women's clothing is much richer, and women can wear various effects (lacework, cropping, odd angles) that open up opportunities for designers. The restrictions our world puts on men's clothing options percolates down to a paucity of knitting options for men.

There's nothing inherently male about plain, boring clothing. In the court of the Sun King, for example, men's clothing was every bit as splendid as anything the women were wearing. Of course, the ancien regime gave a bit of a bad name to foppery.