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View Full Version : Felted potholder info to share!


Jan in CA
09-18-2007, 01:02 AM
I made two felted potholders to test and discovered that a single strand of wool is not enough to keep out the heat. The double stranded one is excellent! Based on these results I wouldn't use anything but felted wool either. You need to have the density felting gives you and any other fiber is just asking for a burn.

Hope this helps someone. :hug:

Limey
09-18-2007, 03:42 AM
Every time I see that word 'potholder', I always think of macrame and geraniums.:eyes:

For the first couple of times, I wondered why people needed thick wool to transplant cuttings!

Ah well, I'll go and plant some seedlings in my oven mitt and see if I can get a begonia in an oven glove.:teehee:

Thanks for the info.

PurlyGyrl
09-18-2007, 08:12 AM
Thanks for the info Jan. I discovered the hard way (or maybe I should say the HOT way) that one strand of cotton doesn't make for a good pot holder either. OUCH!:shock:

:roflhard:Limey!:roflhard: You (and your begonia oven glove) make me giggle :teehee:

Susan P.
09-18-2007, 08:39 AM
Gosh.. in the 70's, a pot holder was a bong. Or a hippy of course.

Limey
09-18-2007, 09:11 AM
Hello my little Marsupial

Are you down from your gum tree again?

I think you mean Pot Head - that's what I (think) I remember anyway :zombie:

Susan P.
09-18-2007, 09:21 AM
By the look of those eyes and aspects of your memory I wouldn't be pointing the finger at me! :)

Personally, I can only whistle on a gum leaf (that part is true).

Susan P.
09-18-2007, 09:22 AM
Limey..pssstttt..I was waxing poetic with the interpretation re the hippy doncha know.

Limey
09-18-2007, 09:26 AM
Susan

There's no need for you to point a finger at you - if you don't know where you are by this time, lass, you're beyond help.:wink:

Nice to know you had a giggle Purlygyrl :)

newamy
09-18-2007, 12:17 PM
Jan do you have a picture of your successful pot holder??

WandaT
09-18-2007, 02:06 PM
LOL - you all are too funny! One question though - I just did a felted oven mitt (pattern here (http://www.madisonknittersguild.org/aanderson_fryingpan.pdf). It calls for one strand and size 9 needles. I admit it's not as thick as my Pampered Chef mitts, but I think it would hold up under basic heat. I mean, sometimes I just double a dish towel to pull something hot from the oven. So my question is do you think one strand is enough using size 9 needles? if not, what pattern are you using that uses double strands. I'd much rather use double strands and larger needles. TIA!

Jan in CA
09-19-2007, 12:28 AM
Ehh..well here it is. It's at an odd angle so it looks even wonkier than it already is. :teehee: I just too some left over wool and knit a large square and then felted it. I don't remember the needle size. No pattern. Sizing was luck really.

I don't know if your oven mitt will work or not. From my own experience I'd have to say no, but go ahead and try it. It might work well enough for you.

panchita
09-19-2007, 12:30 AM
I've been making potholders with double strands of Sugar 'n Cream cotton and size 9 needles. I do find that I need to do a seed stitch or some kind of ribbing to make it think enough to avoid burns (stockinette wouldn't do it).

Sunny_Singer
09-19-2007, 03:02 AM
Thanks for the info - it helps a lot

WandaT
09-19-2007, 06:51 AM
OK thanks, I guess I'll play with a different pattern that requires double strands.

MrsDavis3
09-19-2007, 10:36 AM
just now on a whim I googled
"knitted bong cozy"
and actually found a reference

Jan in CA
09-19-2007, 01:09 PM
I've been making potholders with double strands of Sugar 'n Cream cotton and size 9 needles. I do find that I need to do a seed stitch or some kind of ribbing to make it think enough to avoid burns (stockinette wouldn't do it).

Well...if it works for you then go for it. Wool is generally used though because of it's insulating properties. Just like a sweater..if it's cold and you put on a cotton sweater you won't stay warm, but if you put on a wool one you will. Felting really ups this because there are no places to stick your fingers through. Maybe I'm just a clutz...:think::teehee:

panchita
09-19-2007, 11:57 PM
Well...if it works for you then go for it. Wool is generally used though because of it's insulating properties. Just like a sweater..if it's cold and you put on a cotton sweater you won't stay warm, but if you put on a wool one you will. Felting really ups this because there are no places to stick your fingers through. Maybe I'm just a clutz...:think::teehee:

Maybe mine'll make better trivets. That makes lots of sense about the insulating properties and such. I might need to conduct some experiments... I guess I'll just have to go buy some more yarn. :wink:

Jan in CA
09-20-2007, 03:14 AM
Maybe mine'll make better trivets. That makes lots of sense about the insulating properties and such. I might need to conduct some experiments... I guess I'll just have to go buy some more yarn. :wink:

Oh darn, you have to buy more yarn.. :whistle:

Susan P.
09-20-2007, 06:02 AM
MrsDavis3..I SO laughed :)

karne
09-20-2007, 12:30 PM
I can second the need for felting. One time I grabbed what was a decorative potholder at my mom's to get something out of the oven and dropped the entire thing on the floor. :/

I've thought of making some felted pot holders, but I wonder if they would felt and shrink more each time they were washed. I end up having to wash my pot holders a few times a month.

Jan in CA
09-20-2007, 12:33 PM
I haven't washed mine yet..:shifty:..but I do think they stop shrinking after a few washings. You could just make it a little larger to start with.