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View Full Version : Any Girl Scout Leaders here?


cookworm
10-01-2007, 11:42 AM
I might be teaching a Brownie troop how to knit, and I'm wondering how much I should teach them in order for them to earn a badge (I'm not even sure which badge that learning knitting would go towards). It would be great to teach them as much as possible so perhaps they could establish in themselves an early love of knitting, but I don't know how much will overwhelm 6-8 year olds, and I don't want to "underteach" them, either. What would be required knowledge for them to earn a badge? Also, anybody that has experience teaching girls in this age group that can offer some advice and hints it would be greatly appreciated.

laptop_knitter
10-01-2007, 12:05 PM
I was part of a brownie/guide troop until 2 years ago-I'm pretty sure knitting could go towards either a craft badge or a homemaker one - try lookingon their website

knitncook
10-01-2007, 12:54 PM
I was a Girl Scout leader for many years until my girls' interests went in other directions. There are quite a few different badges that could incorporate knitting. I would talk to the leader you are working with and see if she has a particular idea. With Brownies, many of the badges can be customized to what is important to the girls or the troop. For instance with the science badge we did none of the projects recommended, but did things that were much more advanced as most of the girls had done similar "experiments" in school or at home.

As for what to teach, these are young girls and you have a short time in which to teach them. I would specifically teach them casting on and the knit stitch. IF they catch on in the short amount of time then you can show them how to purl. I would bring examples of work you have done so you can say, "this is what garter stitch looks like" and "this is a cable - it sort of looks like a braid, doesn't it?" Bring stuff that you wouldn't mind 15 or so little girls touching and passing around and possibly dropping on the ground. Try to bring things other than garments for them to see that knitting can be used for a variety of things. Even if some of those are just pictures you downloaded from the WWW.

You can bring it all down to them by explaining how a long time ago (or maybe not that so long ago LOL!) little girls were taught to knit at an early age and how young girls would knit socks for soldiers. And also how in other countries boys and girls are taught to knit in school.

What a fun meeting this will be!

HeatherFeather
10-01-2007, 05:56 PM
I am an assistant leader for a troop with 30+ girls. One thing that I find is that they have NO attention. If they don't get it exactly right then at that exact time, there will be tears....so..my suggestion is to have LOTS of helpers..... or have a special time where 2-3 come with their mothers and THEY do it all together.....

Listening to the Past Try It might be a good one to tie it to..it talks about "life in the ole days"....Officially brownie badges are "try its" so you can google the actual requrements for the badges....

I taught my daughter when she was 6 but it was in fits and spurts....

truble2301
10-02-2007, 06:47 AM
My daughter just became a Senior, so it's been a while since we did the Try-Its, but I remember a "craft" day we had where they learned to crochet, macrame, and a few other fiber-related things, so it seems to me there's some kind of Try-It you can fit that into. Our girls learned some basic macrame knots and to chain and single crochet, IIRC. I would think learning to cast-on and the knit stitch would probably be enough because they could make a simple scarf or washcloth with just that. Oh, I guess binding off would help,too, although you could probably do that for them.

I miss the days of Try-Its! The Interest Projects for the older girls are so much harder to finish. And now we're going for the Gold Award - eek!

Good luck!

Possum
10-02-2007, 07:09 AM
Rather OT, but I just had to comment!
Firstly, best wishes for your foray into teaching.
You have made me giggle! I am a Scout Leader (of boys, mostly) and once I tried to teach our little swamp monsters how to sew a badge or two onto their camp blankets. Never again! Oh, the horror!
Again, best wishes. My only advice is to appeal for assistance from other mothers.

tacwaknitterjen
10-02-2007, 05:08 PM
I'm not trying to discourage you from trying to teach the brownies to knit but i started on crochet first and let me tell you from past experience cause i used to be a girl scout, got my gold, registered for life, the been there done that kind of thing. I was a camp counselor in the summers and when I pulled out my craft projects the girls showed little interest in them. It might be different with the girls you have but it never hurts to try to teach them.

cookworm
10-03-2007, 08:02 AM
Thank you all for your advice and suggestions! :muah: My husband was approached by a coworker that knows I knit; she has a daughter that is in Girl Scouts, and I guess that's where she got the idea to ask if I could teach the girls. I'm still mulling it over because I'm not much of a teacher, and personally, I think that age group is going to be a challenge for me to teach because they're so young and I'm not sure how I'll do trying to teach girls that young (my own daughter is older and it's been slow-going to teach her to knit). I was trying to figure out if maybe teaching them crochet might be easier, but I'm not sure. I didn't want this to be a frustrating time for the girls or for myself, because I didn't want to turn them off to future endeavors with needlework.