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View Full Version : what is the different 2.25mm and 2.50mm?


Carla1019
10-02-2007, 09:05 AM
What is the different in these KnitPick DPN?US Size 1 (2.25mm) to this one US Size 1 (2.50mm) is it how big around it is. and if so what size do I want?

Prazzie
10-02-2007, 09:16 AM
Yes, it is how thick the needle is. The one is 0.25 millimeter thinner than the other one.

My size chart lists both sizes (in mm) under US Size 1.

If the pattern calls for US Size 1, you can use either one, and I would go for the 2.5 mm.

MMario
10-02-2007, 09:31 AM
there is a "non-standard" standard for US size 1 needles - some make them 2.25 mm and some companies make them 2.5 mm.

suzeeq
10-02-2007, 10:32 AM
It depends on which size you need to get the gauge needed.

samm
10-02-2007, 05:29 PM
Getting the required gauge is more important than what size the needles are. Yup, it's .25mm thicker! But know what? The mm sizes are not standard between U.S. sizes and Canadian ones, although why a mm is not a mm is beyond me! Do you have a gauge thingy to stick the needles in? I usually trust that, if I'm in doubt as to whether I've chosen American or British/Canadian needles from my stock. :knitting: samm

Knitting_Guy
10-02-2007, 05:38 PM
If you can't tell the difference with your eyes closed, there's no difference.

Carla1019
10-02-2007, 05:59 PM
Mason,, I should of knew you would spell it out for me.:teehee:

I was just wanting to get some DPN, just to have for when I get ready to do a project, And did not know if there was a big different in the "MM" or not.. Guess not that much where I just can't just order me some.

Thanks for all of your input.

ArtLady1981
10-02-2007, 09:32 PM
I have some needles that are US 5...US6...and one size inbetween! I called it my US 5 1/2...but the package says US6.

The metric sizing can gives more accuracy to the needle thickness.

I found this out quite by accident while sizing needles using one of those needle-size thingys.

So, I am aware that I cannot interchange that supposed US 6 with other US 6's. It is just a little skinnier. It is also very vintage.

redwitch
10-03-2007, 01:57 AM
A millimetre is a size unit of about 1/25th of an inch (about the thickness of a thin fingernail). So a quarter of that is very thin and not a huge consideration.

It's not the size around, but the diameter. Go for whichever one you want, there's no reason to mind if they are not specified. It's like a pattern that calls for 3 mm needles and I know I have sets that are 2.85mm and 3.1 mm. Which one I prefer is not something that anyone should recommend - up to your taste and knitting style.

scubasinger
10-03-2007, 10:28 AM
Sometimes that tiny difference in needle size can add up over the stitches to make a difference in the feel and drape of the fabric being created.

When I got my KP sock needle set, I, too, was intrigued by those tiny differences. So I decided to just knit up a fairly lengthy swatch in my spare time. I'd knit 40 or so rows on one set of needles and then make the switch to the next size up or down. Invariably I found that the switch made a difference in the feel of the cloth. It probably wouldn't affect the size of the sock being created very much, but the fabric was a noticeable change. Subtle, yet noticeable.

misstialouise
10-03-2007, 10:47 AM
THIS is why the metric measuring system is better.. 2.25 is 2.25 and 2.5 is 2.5.

But as others have said, guage is more important than needle size :D

redwitch
10-03-2007, 11:11 AM
Well, gauge is a direct result of needle size, but that depends on the knitter, So if you knit loosely, I'd say use a smaller needle and if more tight;y, a larger needle. But .25 mm will make a negligible difference. I'd choose at random, and use whatever gets tension right.