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kemp
11-20-2007, 02:02 PM
Well...I was just sitting here admiring the first sleeve of my first fair isle sweater and noticed a mistake. WAY. DOWN. AT. THE. BOTTOM. Where the white arrow points there should be another row of "old gold". NO WAY am I frogging this so now this question is do I repeat the mistake on the second sleeve so they match or do it correctly?
If I do the second sleeve correctly there is a small chance I would go back and cut off the bottom of the first sleeve to fix it instead of ripping all the way back. However, if I repeat the mistake on the second sleeve do you think it will then look ok with the body will look done correctly? Picture of finished sweater here: http://www.inlovewithautumnrose.blogspot.com/

Silver
11-20-2007, 02:20 PM
Well I would say "It's barely even noticeable, don't even worry about it." But, being the perfectionist I am, it would drive me nuts if that were my mistake.

I would cut it and do a kitchener stitch graft to fix it. It's a bit of trouble, but if you're anything like me, that mistake is going to haunt you everytime you look at the sweater. And the time spent to fix it will be worth it when you finish your perfect sweater. Which is going to be freaking GORGEOUS, by the way.

I have cut and grafted a new row because one legth of yarn looked "dirtier" than the rest. Yes, I am an utterly obsessed perfectionist. (Which is not always a good thing.) :blush:

sinistral_needler
11-20-2007, 02:22 PM
I would not frog anything, especially something intricate like that! I would make the other sleeve match. The imperfections give it character. I told my mom that I made a mistake on her sweater and that's what she said anyway.

kemp
11-20-2007, 02:36 PM
I would not frog anything, especially something intricate like that! I would make the other sleeve match. The imperfections give it character. I told my mom that I made a mistake on her sweater and that's what she said anyway.
Normally, I would agree (which is why I thought of making the other sleeve match) but this one is totally bugging me!

Well I would say "It's barely even noticeable, don't even worry about it." But, being the perfectionist I am, it would drive me nuts if that were my mistake.

I would cut it and do a kitchener stitch graft to fix it. It's a bit of trouble, but if you're anything like me, that mistake is going to haunt you everytime you look at the sweater. And the time spent to fix it will be worth it when you finish your perfect sweater. Which is going to be freaking GORGEOUS, by the way.

I have cut and grafted a new row because one length of yarn looked "dirtier" than the rest. Yes, I am an utterly obsessed perfectionist. (Which is not always a good thing.) :blush:

:doh: What a fabulous idea! It didn't even occur to me I could graft it! Ok so what do you think would be the easiest? I'm thinking cut it through the row of black since there is only one row of that it won't interfere with anything. Then I could reknit the black row onto the bottom part and graft the bottom to the top using the gold?

Lisa R.
11-20-2007, 02:41 PM
If it were me, I'd say that's just a minor error, that I'd leave it and make the other sleeve match.

But, hey! If you can do all that cutting and grafting, then go for it! I'm not even up to doing such beautiful colorwork myself, so I'm probably not the one to ask.

Jan in CA
11-20-2007, 02:45 PM
If you hadn't pointed it out I probably wouldn't have noticed it. Since it's on the edge like that to me it looks intentional. Rather than frog it just make the other sleeve the same way. No one is the wiser and saves you a ton of hassle.

willi.t
11-20-2007, 03:03 PM
I would just go on, do the other sleeve the same way OR you could forget about this sleeve and do the other according to pattern because the two sleeves will never be side by side for a magnifying glass to compare them. One thing to consider, your sweater will be totally UNIQUE, there will never be another like it.:yay: If you don't tell, no one will know but you.
Willi

Abbily
11-20-2007, 03:05 PM
I agree with Jan. I would never have noticed it, and it does look intentional to me because of the way there is no gold band on the bottom side of that band of reddish (near the bottom of the sleeve).

Debkcs
11-20-2007, 03:11 PM
As someone wise once said, "It's not a mistake, it's a personalization." And as Zappa once said, on another subject, "No one will know unless it's you that tells them so."

Personally, I'd do the other sleeve in the same manner and go for it, unless you really want the learning experience of cutting the sleeve and sewing it back together again; I'm too busy and not nearly Silver enough to do that.:) (Silver :hug: )

Silver
11-20-2007, 03:31 PM
:doh: What a fabulous idea! It didn't even occur to me I could graft it! Ok so what do you think would be the easiest? I'm thinking cut it through the row of black since there is only one row of that it won't interfere with anything. Then I could reknit the black row onto the bottom part and graft the bottom to the top using the gold?
Yep, that's how I would do it. Best to leave it at grafting a solid color row than adding to the difficulty with a multi colored graft. :zombie: Although I know you could totally do it.

Just snip one black stitch and pull out the yarn stitch by stitch and placing each side on a needle. Knit one row of black (to make up for the row you just pulled out, then do the grafting with the gold. Weave in the ends and Viola. Like it never happened, and you'll feel like a total knit master.:hug:

knitncook
11-20-2007, 03:56 PM
I'm not as much of a perfectionist as Silver. I'd just duplicate the same "mistake" in the other sleeve and LET IT GO! I've got too many other things I want to knit to go back and fix one row that doesn't impact the design overall. Deep breath and cast on the other sleeve and just not do that row. And if by mistake you do use the old Amish belief that only God (or your chosen diety) is perfect and thus your work will not be perfect.

PugMom
11-20-2007, 04:18 PM
I'd duplicate this in the second sleeve. I've had errors where I personally felt it was necessary to frog back though, so I understand how you just can't let something go! Good luck.

starburst
11-20-2007, 05:45 PM
I definitely just wrote a college application essay on knitting and knowing when to fix your mistakes and when to let them go

knitncook
11-20-2007, 06:47 PM
I definitely just wrote a college application essay on knitting and knowing when to fix your mistakes and when to let them go
You have SO got to share that with us!

starburst
11-20-2007, 07:45 PM
Ok...well, basically we were given a quote and we had to write 250-600 words on the subject. My first quote was: “The art of being wise is the art of knowing what to overlook.” and there were just so many ways to discuss that. I could have talked about delgation, pride, predjudice, etc, etc., but I really liked how it could be implemented in knitting, so I ran with it and this is what I came up with:


In order to respond to this quote, I’m going to use an analogy that I don’t frequently use due to the odd looks I get for discussing one of my passions: knitting. In knitting, one is given a pattern that calls for a specific yarn in a specific color. Now, you can buy that particular yarn and start your own attempt at making a copy of the original, or you can go wild a try using an unusual color that no one would ever think of (and sometimes never wear). Either way, you sit down with your needles, yarn and pattern and just go for it. Knit purl knit, purl knit purl until you have done what often seems like hundreds of rows. Unfortunately, no matter how skilled you are, you will sometimes notice a flaw or two, or even twenty. Here is where oversight comes into play. What do you do? Can you be content knowing that there are visible flaws? Or are you the type of person who can’t handle knowing that there is something wrong in your art?


After countless hours spent with needles in my hands, I’ve come up with this philosophy: If you and the pattern maker are the only ones who will ever recognize the mistake, leave it be. There is no use risking the rest of the work for one stitch that was purled instead of knitted. If it is major, like a cable twisting the wrong way, go back and fix it. Now, this doesn’t mean that I always follow my own guidelines; I do frequently go back to fix little things just because the knowledge of their existence bothers me. I do, however, try to let myself be content with a finished product despite minor inaccuracies.


I wish that this analogy were so easily implemented in real life, but it’s unfortunately not. It is not so easy as pulling out a few stitches and there are no redos but just because, as a concept, it’s a bit idyllic doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t strive for it. As I’ve gotten older, I’ve come to realize that there are just some things that aren’t worth fussing over. Sometimes, an argument is as unimportant as one wrong stitch and it’s best to just leave it be. There is no sense in worrying about it and maybe, if you go long enough without looking, you’ll forget that it was ever there. I can now look at my first few projects and I see their flaws, but I think that gives them character. It shows me where I’ve come from and it shows me where I am going. It’s only after a few hundred mistakes that you can choose the “character” of your work, it’s only then that you get to have fun with dyes, Fair Isle patterns, and spinning but you’ll never get there if you spend all of your time lamenting over little errors. As the old saying goes, “May god grant you the serenity to accept the things you cannot change, courage to change the things you can, and the wisdom to know the difference.”

redwitch
11-21-2007, 01:50 AM
It took me ages to figure out what you were talking about - it was that you forgot one row of yellow right? That sleeve does not look like it should have a yellow row there at all, it does not look wrong. I am a perfectionist too and go to great lengths to fix tiny imperfections, but this is not a mistake, just an alteration.
Could you perhaps fix it with duplicate stitch (probably not if I picked up the mistake correctly)? Remember that knitting the other way if you pick up that row will make your stitches offset by half a stitch.

hainangel2000
11-21-2007, 02:57 PM
I would make the other arm match. I agree with the rest of the members that posted. You have done a beautiful job on this by the way! :yay:

Mary

Abbily
11-21-2007, 04:20 PM
Silver, I'm so glad you explained the grafting procedure, because it really sounded to me like she was going to cut the sleeve off, all the way across, and then somehow make it go back together without looking like it was cut! Can you tell I've never grafted anything?! Sounds much more doable now.

Still, I would do the 2nd sleeve the same way and call it a day! :)

Silver
11-21-2007, 04:40 PM
Oh you people! No guts, no glory! :teehee: :roflhard:

Quiara
11-21-2007, 04:44 PM
You're thinking about it all wrong. It's not a "mistake" - it's a "pattern interpretation"! Make the other sleeve match and sit back and feel clever for improving an already gorgeous design. ^_^

kemp
11-21-2007, 06:23 PM
Thanks for the comments and suggestions everyone. I know I'm crazy, but since the grafting fix is easy I'm going for it! I've already done the second sleeve correctly (on right). If nothing else it will be an adventure and good blog fodder :teehee: I'll take lots of pictures :) Wish me luck!

The.Knitter
11-21-2007, 06:37 PM
I have to tell you that you have talent. This is a masterpiece. I would never have noticed the missing gold row if I had not been specifically directed to it. Good luck with your grafting and keep up the fantastic work!