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Nanaof6
11-28-2007, 12:54 AM
I just got the Book Encyclopedia of Knitting By Donna Kooler. Great book. I want to practice stitch patterns , they have 150 of them in this book. But I am finding it confusing :wall: How do you follow these charts?

Example,
Horseshoes
Instructions,
multiple of 10 stitches + 1 :shrug: is this how many I cast on to start?
Row1:K1 *yo,k3, sk2p, k3 ,yo ,k1;
repeat from*to end of row :shrug: do I skip K1?

Another instructions will say something like this

Lace Net

Instruction
multiple of 2

Row 1:K1, *yo, k2tog; repeat from *ending with k1 again :shrug: :hair:

saracidaltendencies
11-28-2007, 01:07 AM
For the multiple of 10 sts. + 1, basically add 1 stitch for every 10 stitches. Say you have 10 sts. then adding one would be 11. So, if you have 20 sts. +1, it would be 21.

Row 1 you would knit the first stitch, then, repeat only what's in between the *. So, for your 1st row, you would knit the first stitch then knit only the stitches indicated between the asterisks.


For the lace, the multiples of 2 are your stitches. Such as, 2, 4, 6, etc. When you yarn over, you are going to get an extra stitch which is why you need to k2tog, to get rid of that extra stitch which would give you an uneven number. Basically with that pattern, you're going to repeat what's between the asterisks until you reach the end of the row where, if you have knitted the pattern properly, you should be left with one stitch, which of course, you would knit.

Hope that makes sense!

Shandeh
11-28-2007, 02:57 AM
Horseshoes
multiple of 10 stitches + 1 :shrug: is this how many I cast on to start?
You would cast on a multiple of 10 stitches, plus 1 more stitch. So you would need to cast on 11 stitches, or 21 stitches, or 31, or 41, or 51.....

(The number of stitches you cast on depends on how wide you want your item to be. So, if you want to make a scarf with that design, just cast on 21 stitches and knit for a while to see if it's wide enough. If it's not, then frog it and start over with 31 stitches instead.)

Row1:K1 *yo,k3, sk2p, k3 ,yo ,k1;
repeat from*to end of row :shrug: do I skip K1?
For this row, you would Knit 1 stitch, then YO, K3, SK2P, K3, YO, K1. Then, you would continue the row, beginning with the YO, K3, SK2P, K3, YO, K1 over and over again until you get to the end. If you only cast on 11 stitches to start with, you wouldn't repeat that part at all, because you would be finished with the row. If you cast on 21 stitches to start with, you would only repeat that part one time.


Lace Net
multiple of 2
You would cast on 4 stitches, or 6, or 8, or 10, or 12.....
(again, depending on how wide you want the item to be)


Row 1:K1, *yo, k2tog; repeat from *ending with k1 again
For this row, you would Knit 1 stitch, then YO, K2tog over and over again until you get to the last stitch. Then, you would knit that 1 stitch.

Good luck. :thumbsup:

Jan in CA
11-28-2007, 01:33 PM
I found this tutorial very helpful for learning to read charts.
http://www.knitfoundry.com/tutorial/HowToReadCharts.pdf

Nanaof6
11-28-2007, 02:41 PM
Does anyone have this Book??

What I want to do is try and do some of the swatches in the very back , in the 'KNITTING PATTERN GALLERY'
They show these nice stitch patterns but I don't know how many I need to case on to start any one of the swatches? What is a good number when your making a swatch and it is a pattern like lace ?

suzeeq
11-28-2007, 03:02 PM
The st patterns are usually given as a `multiple of X plus x sts'. For just a sampler or a scarf, you can cast on about 2-4 times the multiple or something that will come close to about 20-30 sts. If a pattern is mult 4 + 2 then 18, 22 or 26 should work. If it's a mult of 8 +3 then 19 or 27.

Shandeh
11-28-2007, 10:01 PM
Does anyone have this Book??
What I want to do is try and do some of the swatches in the very back , in the 'KNITTING PATTERN GALLERY'
They show these nice stitch patterns but I don't know how many I need to case on to start any one of the swatches? What is a good number when your making a swatch and it is a pattern like lace ?

Yes, I have the book.

Here's an example:
On page 203, you'll see the pattern for "Feather and Fan" (the pink design in the middle of the page. If you look under the photo, you'll see the chart, then you'll see the written directions underneath that.

The written directions say "Multiple of 12 stitches"
So, this means you need to cast on 12 stitches, or 24 stitches, or 36 stitches, or 48 stitches. (a multiple of 12)

Then, you'll be able to knit the design.

Nanaof6
11-29-2007, 12:12 AM
Sandy, when it reads multiple of 10 stitches + 1 then why don't they just say 11? remember I am new at this knitting language. Sorry if I appear dumb here, but I am still learning on my own as I go.




On the charts on page 203 feather and fan , what do the numbers mean that run down both sides, are those the rows? and what does the yellow block in the chart with the { under it mean? (not sure what the mark is called sorry)

Newbie2Knitting
11-29-2007, 01:34 AM
[QUOTE=Nanaof6;1013305]Sandy, when it reads multiple of 10 stitches + 1 then why don't they just say 11? remember I am new at this knitting language. Sorry if I appear dumb here, but I am still learning on my own as I go.



[\QUOTE]

I don't have the book, so I can only answer the 1st part of your question. It doesn't say cast on 11 stitches b/c you don't want multiples of 11. Think of it like this. With multiples of 10 +1 cast on the multiple first; in this case you want a multiple of 10 which would be 10, 20, 30, 40, however wide you want your project. Then just add 1 stitch more at the end of the row so you would have a grand total of 11 (or 21, 31, 41 - again, however wide you want your project to be). What you *don't* want to do (and I made this mistake at the beginning, too) is to cast on 10, add 1, cast on 10 more, add 1, and so on - that *is* multiples of 11 - you just keep casting on 11 stitches over and over. If you had a pattern that had multiples of 4 +1, you would cast on 4 (or 8 or 12 or 16) and when you're done doing the multiple of 4, you would cast on one more stitch at the end of the row for your +1 (for a total of 5, 9, 13, or 17). Hope that clears it up!

Shandeh
11-29-2007, 11:10 AM
Exactly.

If they said 11, then you would possibly cast on 22 or 33 stitches, which would not work.

It's a multiple of 10, then you add one stitch at the end of the row. That makes the pattern work properly.

Just try casting on different amounts, and you'll see what I mean.

For example, with the "Horseshoes" pattern, if you cast on 21 (10 x 2 +1) stitches, here's what you'd do:
Row 1: K1, YO, K3, SK2P, K3, YO, K1, YO, K3, SK2P, K3, YO, K1
If you had cast on 22 stitches, you would still have one stitch left on your needle, unworked.

Nanaof6
11-29-2007, 12:50 PM
multiple of 10 stitches + 1 so does the 1 sts get eaten up as you go a long?

suzeeq
11-29-2007, 01:28 PM
The 1 st will be done at the end of the row. You repeat the 10 sts only, then have 1 leftover which you'd knit.

Ellieblue
11-29-2007, 01:56 PM
It seems that you are wondering how to read/work the charts in the book. Usually there is a chapter at the front of the book which shows what each of the symbols stands for. Basically the numbers down the side of the pattern chart are the row numbers. Usually you work from right(row 1) then back on row 2(left side of chart}, the written instructions under the chart are just an explanation of each row written out; so if you follow the chart, you can ignore the written instructions. Usually the left side row is all purl. Hope this helps. Ellie

Nanaof6
11-29-2007, 02:24 PM
So sorry to be asking so many questions,but I am truely grateful for all of the help.

But can anyone tell me ,
what does the yellow block in the chart with the { under it mean? (not sure what the mark is called sorry)

Shandeh
11-29-2007, 04:00 PM
multiple of 10 stitches + 1 so does the 1 sts get eaten up as you go a long?
The one stitch in the Horseshoe Pattern is the very first knit stitch of the row. There will not be a leftover stitch at the end.

what does the yellow block in the chart with the { under it mean? (not sure what the mark is called sorry)

That mark shows the repeating pattern that is listed between the asterisks on the written instructions.

If you use the written instructions, you don't have to use the chart. The chart can be used instead if you prefer using a chart.

Nanaof6, the best way to understand these instructions is just to cast on 21 stitches, and try it. It will make sense when you do it. That's the way most knitting is. Just reading the instructions can be confusing. But, when you do the actual knitting, it all falls into place.

Like Ingrid always says, "Trust the pattern".

Jan in CA
11-29-2007, 04:36 PM
I suggest for the first few times you attempt one of these stitch patterns that you ignore the chart and follow the written instructions.

Everyone has given you good advice, but maybe you need more visual help. Do you know anyone who knits locally or have an LYS nearby?

Nanaof6
11-30-2007, 12:07 AM
Thanks again guys, I guess your right ,I just have to do it! I am glad to know that I don't have to follow those charts as I can follow the written instructions ...kinda,sometimes I get I smig confused. I am just trying to teach myself everything I can about this wonderful world of knitting that I have found. I want to be knowledgeable in what there is out there on knitting.


Yes I do have my LYS here ,I was hopeing the there might of been a visual help here on the site, They do super at providen them for us. I thought there might be one for this topic.
Nana,

saracidaltendencies
11-30-2007, 12:44 AM
Shandeh is 100% correct, just follow the pattern. I used to have a bad habit of reading too far ahead in the patterns and would get so overwhelmed I would think, "eh, one day, maybe."

I was told a while ago by a fellow knitter to just knit it...lol...Just do what's instructed in the pattern and it will all make sense...If you try to read it all at once it does become confusing, but if you just start your project, following the pattern line by line, it will make so much more sense.

suzeeq
11-30-2007, 12:46 AM
Yes, it's much easier to follow along with the yarn and needles in your hands than try to figure it out in your head. With the work in front of you, you can see what to do next.