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View Full Version : Is $25.00 per class too much?


Cristy
01-03-2008, 09:33 PM
My snb buddies and I did a yarn crawl today and I found an AWESOME yarn store with a VERY COOL class...it's an aran technique class. You come once a month and each month you learn a different technique and knit a square using it. It goes for 12 months and when you finish, you put the squares together for an heirloom blanket. They had samples of all 12 squares and it was absolutely beautiful!!! Then I found out it's $25.00 per class (silly me, at first I thought it was $25.00 for all classes!!! I knew that sounded too good to be true...). I would really like to do it but it seems a little pricey. They don't provide the materials and you have to purchase them at their store--they give you several yarn choices in the right weight/color. If I've done my math correctly, that's $300.00 not including the yarn...

My thoughts were that it would be an awesome Christmas present for my parents. The shop owner said that near the end they "speed up" a little for those who want to finish a little early in time for Christmas.

miccisue
01-03-2008, 09:42 PM
My snb buddies and I did a yarn crawl today and I found an AWESOME yarn store with a VERY COOL class...it's an aran technique class. You come once a month and each month you learn a different technique and knit a square using it. It goes for 12 months and when you finish, you put the squares together for an heirloom blanket. They had samples of all 12 squares and it was absolutely beautiful!!! Then I found out it's $25.00 per class (silly me, at first I thought it was $25.00 for all classes!!! I knew that sounded too good to be true...). I would really like to do it but it seems a little pricey. They don't provide the materials and you have to purchase them at their store--they give you several yarn choices in the right weight/color. If I've done my math correctly, that's $300.00 not including the yarn...

My thoughts were that it would be an awesome Christmas present for my parents. The shop owner said that near the end they "speed up" a little for those who want to finish a little early in time for Christmas.
OK, I get that it's $25 for each class, but how long is the class? If it's for the whole month, some people might not think it's too bad. Personally, I wouldn't pay that much for a class - especially if no materials are provided. I know I'm from a small town, but I've never heard of a class costing $300!!!!!!!! Way back when I took my knitting class, it was $15 or $20, and that was for one night a week for 6 weeks. Materials weren't provided, either, but we purchased them at a very good discount as a side perk for taking the class. These ladies will still, if you buy the yarn at their shop, let you come in and sit and knit and will help you with any problems you might have. I haven't been able to take any of their other classes, but I know they are nowhere near the price you're talking about, and I'm sure their service is every bit as good or better. I think you can find a better deal - if not at a store, from an experienced knitter who would teach you the same techniques for a lot better price.
JMHO.

gal51
01-03-2008, 09:49 PM
You're not near me, but at a store near me in Duluth this is what they do:

Learn a variety of stitches and techniques while creating a unique Afghan a block at a time. Each quarter is $15, plus purchase of book and first skein of Cascade Yarn. Come the next month with completed block(s) get instructions for next block(s) get 15% off purchase of next skein. Miss a month & pay full price for skein to get back on track. Average cost of Cascade is $7/skein. Third Tues. 6P or Wed. 10A, start 1/15 or 1/16.

I hope this helps you ... theirs is $15/quarter, as you can see ...

Cristy
01-03-2008, 10:20 PM
Clarification--it's $25.00 per class--the class is two hours long and it meets once a month. So you pay the $25.00 each month when you come to class.
I've thought about it a couple of ways. I don't think it sounds like a lot if you look at it as you are getting a two-hour semi-private lesson for $25.00. It's just that it would take 12 of those classes to complete the whole project I'd be working on (and a year!!!).
When you think of it as a $300.00+ afghan that takes a year to make--it seems like a lot. Especially when this knitting shop is 45 miles from my house.
Duluth actually isn't that bad--it's probably slightly closer than Kennesaw. I live in Stockbridge which is in Henry County--below Jonesboro but just above McDonough. I'm about 25 miles south of Turner Field. What is the name of the Duluth yarn store...I may actually look into that...Thanks for the info gal--by quarter--you mean each quarter of the afghan? So if I understand--it takes 4 months to complete? That might fit my adhd a little better LOL!

Cristy
01-03-2008, 11:15 PM
bump

alleusion
01-03-2008, 11:46 PM
If they were asking for the $300 up front, I'd say it was too much. But $25 a month seems okay to me. I know most LYS charge around $100 for a month of classes (generally one a week) so it works out to around the same amount.

And with them charging you only once a month, and for the classes you attend, it seems you don't get penalized for missing a class.

Jan in CA
01-04-2008, 12:34 AM
$25 a month doesn't sound too bad. Do they help you if you need it during the month?

brittyknits
01-04-2008, 12:36 AM
I think this is highway robbery. Some friends of mine take classes at an LYS in the next town, and this woman, whom everyone says is a wonderful and talented and very experienced teacher, charges each person $10 per lesson, which generally runs for 2 hours. They are usually month long classes, meeting once a week, so the entire class will be $40 plus materials which are $10 - 20, depending on the project. Asking for $300 to finish a project, and you have to buy the yarn from her?! An entire afghan's worth?! Think of the 10 - 20 great knitting books you could buy for that! If you can do a cable stitch (FREE videos on this site!) and bobbles, that's all you need to know. Ohhh, this really is getting my blood boiling. I personally would never do it, but if you have the money to spare and want to. . .

ekgheiy
01-04-2008, 12:43 AM
In defense of the teacher .... If you break it down to a hourly rate of $12.50, it's not that bad considering a lot of regular knitting lessons (at least those I've come across) are $10 per hour. And since this class is a more specialized/focused class, $2.50 bump is explained. With so much inflation going on, I don't think that $12.50 per hour is an unreasonable wage.

Notwithstanding, I personally would not enroll in the class because (in addition to the fact that the fee is exclusive) I would perceive it as another bill to pay; and I have enough bills already. Now, if money weren't an issue, would I still skip the class? Probably yes. Because I could take that same $25 to buy a book to learn the same techniques. And that's $25 ... period; not $25 per month. ;)

Does the that fee include tea & crumpets or *something*?? Treats & stuff might make that $$$ pill a little easier to swallow. :mrgreen:

Jan in CA
01-04-2008, 01:42 AM
The prices vary somewhat at my LYS...I paid $60 for 5 two hour sock classes. They also have drop in time where you can pay $50 for 5 two hour sessions for knitting help regardless of what you are doing. There was another (now closed) LYS that charged much more. I don't see $25 a month as highway robbery if you are doing something you really want to do, can afford it AND can get help if you need it for free other times of the month if necessary. It may be more than some places, but if you want to do it go for it! :thumbsup:

ArtLady1981
01-04-2008, 03:04 AM
$25 per class: not a bad price. Hopefully they won't have 40 people in the class, of varying skill levels! Ask about the number of students the class is "limited to". It makes a huge difference when it comes to the quality of instruction you'll get. Sometimes they get greedy and will fit in as many knitters as have a checkbook!

A Fair-Isle/Intarsia workshop I enrolled in several years ago was way way way overbooked. The teacher spent a lot of her time showing some knitters very elementary things, such as casting on, for example. (the class size was not her fault...she was a guest instructor at the LYS). It just sucked up the class instruction time terribly. That class was very expensive, and I feel I got robbed. It really turned me off on classes for a long time. Can you tell it still peeves me? :eyes: That LYS is out of business now.

My current LYS recently lowered their classes to reflect $10 per hour. Still, paying for classes is hard for me to cough up, too.

But, your Aran Squares class sounds very interesting!!! :woot:

I took a Finishing Techniques class. Well worth the moolah.

IMHO any class that teaches 'techniques' is a class that keeps on giving and giving because you can carry the techniques over to so many other projects. It is a lifetime of skill.

Sometimes ya just have to bite the bullet and go for it! :thumbsup:

knitncook
01-04-2008, 09:28 AM
As you can see it really depends on the person, location and expectation. I see $25 a month as pretty expensive to get a pattern each month, especially if there is no yarn coming with it. Now if it were a pattern, yarn and instructions it may be a better price to me. But then I am familiar with Aran knitting so :shrug: If it were a totally new technique to me I might be a bit more inclined to pay $25 for a class.

I know here that basic knitting classes are around $25 an hour for semi-private instruction (anywhere from 1-12 students). JoAnn offers a class for about that much plus supplies each month. My "learn a sock in a day class" I charge $25 each for up to 5 people. That includes instructions, take home sheets, and a small lunch. Students have to provide their own needles and yarn (which I specify and it is fairly inexpensive - maybe another $10-$12). I haven't taught a basic class yet to anyone other than our homeschool group (which I didn't charge for).

gal51
01-04-2008, 09:56 AM
Clarification--it's $25.00 per class--the class is two hours long and it meets once a month. So you pay the $25.00 each month when you come to class.
I've thought about it a couple of ways. I don't think it sounds like a lot if you look at it as you are getting a two-hour semi-private lesson for $25.00. It's just that it would take 12 of those classes to complete the whole project I'd be working on (and a year!!!).
When you think of it as a $300.00+ afghan that takes a year to make--it seems like a lot. Especially when this knitting shop is 45 miles from my house.
Duluth actually isn't that bad--it's probably slightly closer than Kennesaw. I live in Stockbridge which is in Henry County--below Jonesboro but just above McDonough. I'm about 25 miles south of Turner Field. What is the name of the Duluth yarn store...I may actually look into that...Thanks for the info gal--by quarter--you mean each quarter of the afghan? So if I understand--it takes 4 months to complete? That might fit my adhd a little better LOL!

It's at the Share the Spirit (http://www.quiltsites.com/share.htm) shop in the little town of Duluth - not too far from I-85. I know exactly where you are - my brother and his family live in Stockbridge. Anyway, I think they mean $15/quarter year since it is a monthly project.

HTH!

Plantgoddess+
01-04-2008, 11:24 AM
I think it would depend on your level of ability (can you figure the stitches out yourself), can you pick and choose the classes you attend, and how many in class.
I bought a booklet at Michaels that has patterns for 60 different Aran design blocks to make into an afghan choosing 24 of the designs. It cost 6.99, but I also have a couple of decades of knitting under my belt and feel capable of doing any pattern in the booklet without help.
In otherwords how much can you learn and how much is the knowledge worth to you?

GinnyG
01-04-2008, 12:29 PM
$25 a month doesn't sound too bad. Do they help you if you need it during the month?

I agree. $25.00 for a 2 hour class isn't too bad. It's a bit expensive but it is an advanced technique you are learning. I didn't read the rest of the postd but I would also want to know how many were in the class. For that price it should be limited to 4 or 5. Too many in the class and you won't get your "money's worth".

Cristy
01-04-2008, 12:30 PM
Thanks for the wealth of responses you guys! :hug:
I am experienced enough (and yes, I can cable--it's my fav!!) to learn from a book but I find that motivation is my issue. I thought that paying for a class might be a good way to keep me interested--I'd meet new people, get some free time for myself, and I'd know that I was paying for it so I'd feel obligated to complete the project! I knit fairly fast so I was actually thinking that maybe I could complete two of the squares each month and then I'd have an afghan for my parents and in-laws by next Christmas w/o doing my usual wait until the last minute and then stress out for three weeks while I try to make Christmas presents!
I don't know about highway robbery--$12.50 an hour is barely making it these days with cost of gas and inflation! The class is limited to 8 students per class for those who asked.... I do have some Saturday obligations from time to time and when I asked, she said last year they had three groups of 8 running--each on a different Saturday of the month so if my Saturday came around and I couldn't make it--if I'd let them know in advance they would allow me to make up the session with one of the other groups so I could still complete my afghan.
Honestly--I could do Aran knitting without help--I'm totally self taught and knit pretty darn well but I admit that the only time I've tried bobbles (granted--it was three years ago...) I wanted to pull my hair out and the lady trying to show me was totally not helpful!
I'm going to check out the yarn store in duluth that gal posted to see how their little knit sessions go. I'll let you guys know what I decide!

Lisa R.
01-04-2008, 12:39 PM
Well, given what you've written, it looks like it would be a good fit for you. Post pictures of your progress if you go for it!

GinnyG
01-04-2008, 01:04 PM
Well, you might look at it this way....... now a days the insurance co pay for a "therapy" appointment can run from $20-50.00 depending on your insurance provider. I think getting together to knit with 7 other women for two hours once a month is the best therapy there is!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

miccisue
01-04-2008, 01:20 PM
Well, you might look at it this way....... now a days the insurance co pay for a "therapy" appointment can run from $20-50.00 depending on your insurance provider. I think getting together to knit with 7 other women for two hours once a month is the best therapy there is!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Depends on the women....I've met some who remind me of Elvira Gulch from the "Wizard Of Oz" and look like they'd just as soon stab you with their needles if you aren't quite up to their speed, LOL!!!!!! Of course, most of the people I've met through knitting are absolute dreams - but I have run across a couple of "biddies" out there.:teehee:

silegose
01-04-2008, 02:20 PM
I to feel that is to much money!! Most people do visit the LYS and purchase their yarns from them sometimes spending over 150.00 for yarn just to make a sweater. I feel if you are taking a class at a LYS then the class fee should be 0 since you will be spending XX dollars on the yarn from that store. The LYS really need to think about repeat business with the purchases of the yarns and not concentrate on how much they can charge for a class. It is the yarn sales that will keep them in business.

If I sign up for a class and the class is free. I Would spend a little more on the yarn I use. Which would be a better trade off?

just my 2 cents worth.
ter

Jan in CA
01-04-2008, 02:28 PM
I thought that paying for a class might be a good way to keep me interested--I'd meet new people, get some free time for myself, and I'd know that I was paying for it so I'd feel obligated to complete the project! I knit fairly fast so I was actually thinking that maybe I could complete two of the squares each month and then I'd have an afghan for my parents and in-laws by next Christmas

There you go! I think you have your answer!:thumbsup:

suzeeq
01-04-2008, 02:39 PM
Well, very often the teacher is not a yarn store employee, so she needs to get some compensation for her time. So a reasonable fee which goes to the teacher is in order, but a discount on yarn should be offered.

miccisue
01-04-2008, 02:53 PM
Well, very often the teacher is not a yarn store employee, so she needs to get some compensation for her time. So a reasonable fee which goes to the teacher is in order, but a discount on yarn should be offered.
Agreed, (although the class I took WAS taught by the store owners..mother and daughter) but $200 for a two hour class? And there are 3 different classes, so that means $600...and that's per month. I personally think that's a bit more than a "reasonable fee"....but that's just me. It would be nice to make $100/hour, but it just doesn't shake out right for me.
Again, JMHO.

suzeeq
01-04-2008, 02:57 PM
Yes, that's a bit much, not at all reasonable.

KathleenG
01-04-2008, 03:08 PM
I think Jan hit it on the head- You'll meet new people and you'll have the motivation, and that's why you want to go! You can't get these things from a book or a video. If it were I, I would go!
It's pricey, and they should offer a discount on the yarn, but at least you know that you'll get the help you might need, and most important YOU'LL GET IT FINISHED!!:)

KathleenG
01-04-2008, 03:14 PM
miccisue- I wonder if we've gone to the same arn shop, which is owned by a mother and daughter. Do you live in Wisconsin?

Debkcs
01-04-2008, 03:27 PM
Here in the Williamette Valley, that is not at all expensive. My LYS only gives a 10% discount on supplies when you sign up for the class, but, you can go in anytime and get help. If you need help on something not related to one of their classes that you are taking, they charge $5.00/half an hour.

The woman that offers help is a Master Knitter, one of the finest knitters I've ever been around. She's also a retired math teacher, and can't understand why I don't 'get' knitting math.

miccisue
01-04-2008, 03:27 PM
miccisue- I wonder if we've gone to the same arn shop, which is owned by a mother and daughter. Do you live in Wisconsin?
No, I'm in Illinois.

ArtLady1981
01-04-2008, 03:28 PM
As you can see it really depends on the person, location and expectation. I see $25 a month as pretty expensive to get a pattern each month, especially if there is no yarn coming with it. Now if it were a pattern, yarn and instructions it may be a better price to me. But then I am familiar with Aran knitting so :shrug: If it were a totally new technique to me I might be a bit more inclined to pay $25 for a class.

I know here that basic knitting classes are around $25 an hour for semi-private instruction (anywhere from 1-12 students). JoAnn offers a class for about that much plus supplies each month. My "learn a sock in a day class" I charge $25 each for up to 5 people. That includes instructions, take home sheets, and a small lunch. Students have to provide their own needles and yarn (which I specify and it is fairly inexpensive - maybe another $10-$12). I haven't taught a basic class yet to anyone other than our homeschool group (which I didn't charge for).

Hi knitncook! :waving: If I lived within driving distance from you, I would sign up for your sock class! Sounds like you have it all together! All the right components for a delightful experience! :happydance:

ArtLady1981
01-04-2008, 03:37 PM
Here in the Williamette Valley, that is not at all expensive. My LYS only gives a 10% discount on supplies when you sign up for the class, but, you can go in anytime and get help. If you need help on something not related to one of their classes that you are taking, they charge $5.00/half an hour.

The woman that offers help is a Master Knitter, one of the finest knitters I've ever been around. She's also a retired math teacher, and can't understand why I don't 'get' knitting math.

Hi Deb! :waving:

Oh my! Would I ever love to find a Master Knitter that gives classes! She sounds phenomenal!

But I will say one thing....BEING a master knitter does not the TEACHER make! It is one thing to be able to DO IT yourself...it is quite another to be able TO TEACH SOMEONE ELSE to do it themselves. :doh:

What is knitting math?

suzeeq
01-04-2008, 03:40 PM
Knitting math is figuring gauge, how many sts do you dec/inc across a row, etc.

Cristy
01-04-2008, 03:41 PM
Well you all have certainly given me something to think about...I haven't made up my mind yet but I think I'm leaning towards doing it. I did call to ask some questions and yes, you can drop in anytime for help (although I don't live close enough to do that but they said I could call and they'd do what they could via phone or email) and they offer 10% off of the supplies you purchase when you are taking one of their classes.

ArtLady1981
01-04-2008, 03:44 PM
Knitting math is figuring gauge, how many sts do you dec/inc across a row, etc.

Yayyyy! I know how to do knitting math then! Boy, I've done more figuring than that...when try to tinker around and re-size that darn Dollar-and-a-Half cardigan. :hair:ACK!

suzeeq
01-04-2008, 03:45 PM
Exactly!

Lisa R.
01-04-2008, 04:10 PM
I to feel that is to much money!! Most people do visit the LYS and purchase their yarns from them sometimes spending over 150.00 for yarn just to make a sweater. I feel if you are taking a class at a LYS then the class fee should be 0 since you will be spending XX dollars on the yarn from that store. The LYS really need to think about repeat business with the purchases of the yarns and not concentrate on how much they can charge for a class. It is the yarn sales that will keep them in business.

If I sign up for a class and the class is free. I Would spend a little more on the yarn I use. Which would be a better trade off?

just my 2 cents worth.
ter



Nice as it would be to have free instruction, I'd have to say in this day and age, it would be a rare find to come across an instructor who would be willing to donate their time to teach a class for free---even if it's the yarn store owner, they should be worthy of their time, IMHO.

ArtLady1981
01-04-2008, 05:56 PM
LisaR, you are right!

However, IF I owned a Yarn Shop these days...I would try to compete with the lower prices of internet yarn shops by doing something they can't: offering simple classes to customers who purchase the yarn from me for the class. Yes, I know my time is valuable...but, acquiring new customers and converting infrequent customers to dedicated customers would make it worth a try!

Everyone loves the word FREE. It is like a magnet.

What would you think about a yarn shop that had a sign displayed by some beautiful yarn:

"Knit This Scarf! FREE CLASS with purchase of yarn! Class is Saturday, Jan 26th, from 10-noon only! Purchase your yarn and sign up today! Don't miss out! Class size is limited! You must bring your own size 9 needles to class!"

I would make sure that the scarf was an "easy teach"...and about 2 skeins of beautiful yarn.

I think it would be worth a try. What would I have to lose but a little time? LYS's are severely challenged these days to keep afloat. I'd try it and see what happens!

Jan in CA
01-04-2008, 06:03 PM
Great idea, Dollyce! I would definitely take a class that offered something like that.. or even pay a small fee for the class. This isn't to say I wouldn't pay more for a class, but something like that would really draw people in I'd think.

Plantgoddess+
01-04-2008, 06:09 PM
Most things are worth what someone is willing to pay. I happen to be cheap, but if something is important to me then I will pay what I must to learn or aquire something.
It sounds as if these classes will be worth $25 a month for you and learning something new is something you will have for the rest of your life.

Lisa R.
01-04-2008, 06:19 PM
What would you think about a yarn shop that had a sign displayed by some beautiful yarn:

"Knit This Scarf! FREE CLASS with purchase of yarn! Class is Saturday, Jan 26th, from 10-noon only! Purchase your yarn and sign up today! Don't miss out! Class size is limited! You must bring your own size 9 needles to class!"



I'd sign up in a flash!:thumbsup:

hainangel2000
01-04-2008, 07:01 PM
to much to me! I would rather buy the video off this site then spend 25 bucks for a 2 hour class! NOT:whoosh: Pretty sure not! :teehee:
Anyway Heck maybe I need to teach a knitting class at that! I could be rich :rofl:

miccisue
01-04-2008, 08:30 PM
I guess I'm the cheap one of the bunch, but I couldn't honestly imagine spending $300 for 12 classes PLUS the added cost of materials beyond that. In our budget, that $300 would be quite a chunk of change....and I'm too cheap to cut out our "long weekend" vacation (seriously, that's all we get for vacation time - our employees get more, but not the family part of the family owned business) to have the $$$ to pay for that expensive a class.:shrug: :noway:

Cristy
01-04-2008, 08:57 PM
I know what you mean about the family-owned business--my husband owns his own and I spend a great deal of time helping out on top of the 50 hours per week I put into my job and then I take care of my children. I feel like I diserve a day off a month! The money is significant and we don't have a ton but honestly...If I added up all of the yarn I purchase in a year that doesn't get used for a project--I'm POSTIVE I spend more than $300.00--possibly 3 or 5 fold! LOL!

I love how responsive you all are. I still haven't decided for sure...I did check out the other shop that gal mentioned but the days/times that you can choose from are in the evening or early morning and my weekdays are FULL!

Quiara
01-06-2008, 03:56 AM
I believe one who takes the time to teach should be compensated. That said, my old LYS had a policy wherein if you bought needles and yarn, they'd give you a "how to knit" intro class for free. Other classes were various prices. *shrug* I dunno. I'm not much of a class person - I like to teach myself - but I can definitely see the social perks.

I don't think it's particularly overpriced. I probably wouldn't shell out $25 + supplies for something I'd rather teach myself, but I'm an introvert and prefer my time alone. ^_~ Plus, I have a fabulous group of friends who all knit and we get together and teach and learn from each other. It's terrific.