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oncegoneinsane
01-07-2008, 10:11 PM
cloud9 i have really bad pain in my wrist and my elbow after knitting for a few minutes. what do you guys use to stop the pain

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Jen17
01-07-2008, 10:55 PM
carpel tunnel surgery did it for me!

But, you don't say if you know why you have the pain...have you been to the doctor?

starburst
01-07-2008, 11:01 PM
aspirin, hot pads, ice packs. It just depends on what works for you

Becky Morgan
01-07-2008, 11:12 PM
Watch your position while you're kniotting. My shoulder was killing me last year until I realized my new desk chair was a different height from the old one, which was making me hold my arm at a funny angle while typing.
If it isn't position, see if you're holding your needles too tightly. Try a different method if it might help--English or Continental, depending on which you do now. Change one thing at a time until you find what's wrong.
All the pain relief suggestions are good, but if you don't find the problem soon, see your doctor. Sometimes simple exercises or medication can take care of carpal tunnel, tennis elbow or bursitis before they get really bad.

Rhea
01-08-2008, 01:18 AM
I agree with Becky Morgan. Make sure your posture and chair is comfortable.

Also, i notice that when i am stressed i tend to knit with the work right up in my face, and i notice my wrists hurt more in this position. So i suggest you drop the work to your lap, even resting your wrists on your legs while knitting.

Hoping that makes sense.

suzeeq
01-08-2008, 01:22 AM
Or you can put a pillow in your lap and rest your hands on that.

fionat
01-08-2008, 11:33 AM
I get the same exact thing..and its probably for some of the reasons people have already mentioned. I am also on the computer quite a bit, so I may have the beginnings of cts...But, meantime, there are two things I do, that have helped, aside from keeping the knitting in my lap more. They make "knitting gloves" they are kind of awkward to get used to, because they're sort of tight. Your fingers aren't covered..they just cover your wrists and the palm of your hand. They actually do help me when I've been doing alot of "busy work" with my hands. If that fails, I will put a stronger wrist "wrap" on while knitting. My right hand and wrist is the one that bothers me the most, so I can use just one. Its worth a try. You can get the knitting gloves at most crafting stores. I've seen them in lots of places. The wrist wrap thing is in pharmacy's by all the splints and ace bandages. I've also used aleve when I get toooo uncomfortable. Thats what the doctor recommended....for some reason it works better then tylenol or advil. good luck!! I know when it hurts, the fun is kinda gone from the project:(...get better soon

cindycactus
01-08-2008, 11:47 AM
I have tried everything else so on Thurs. I am having Carpal Tunner surgery. I am praying it does the trick because I do not want to give up knitting or my computer. :pray:

amosellie
01-08-2008, 01:05 PM
A good chiropractor and accupuncturist will do the trick! Also, take breaks and do the exercises your Dr. should suggest.

Good luck - it is painful but surgery should always be the LAST option!!

knitncook
01-08-2008, 01:09 PM
Is this a new skill for you? Sometimes people who haven't done a skill that requires a lot of small movements with their hands have to approach that skill slowly. Do a little each day or in small sittings to get used to the new movement. Watch how you hold your hands as well. I can't knit Continental for very long without having pain in my left hand, so I mostly knit English (although will trade back and forth periodically.)

suzeeq
01-08-2008, 01:24 PM
I second doing anything but surgery; a coworker of mine had 2 ct surgeries on the same wrist this summer and is out now because of another surgery to correct nerve damage from the first 2. Many CT surgeries have to be re-done because they don't really correct the problem.

About 70% of Carpal Tunnel symptoms are because of too tight muscles in the arms, shoulders and even the neck that squeeze the nerves and blood vessels, impeding the flow of blood and oxygen to you hands and fingers. Acupuncture works very well, so does therapeutic massage and both cost much less than surgery, though insurance companies probably won't pay for it. Massage your lower arms yourself especially up near the elbow; paraffin dips can help relax the muscles. Then do stretches to loosen up the contracted muscle. Please avoid the surgery, it can cause more harm than good.