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photolady
01-24-2008, 04:04 PM
What do you do for hand cramps, after knitting for too long?
Do they eventually go away, after the muscles get used to being used?
My thumb, the chubby part of the thumb, is hurting, and, my arm, from being in a bent position for an hour or more at a time.

What to do for that?:hmm:

bethany
01-24-2008, 05:20 PM
I cramp up all over the place all the time, not just from knitting. I always heard that eating bananas help decrease cramps (the potassium) but I think the Fish Oil tabs and especially Flax Seed (oil) helps me tremendously! Plus, it's good for the heart and cholesterol and joints and tissues and regularity....

Plus, I wiggle a lot :) Rub those spots with a little olive oil and sugar, rinse with warm water and soap, then lotion up and massage those parts while you put the lotion on...ahhh....like a mini spa!

sparkleshan
01-24-2008, 06:15 PM
I just started knitting last week and I am having the same problem with the cramping in the top bone of my hand. I'll have to try the massaging!

cristeen
01-24-2008, 06:56 PM
Massage and heat.

Lisa R.
01-24-2008, 07:27 PM
If you're knitting in the same position for an hour or more without a break, you're asking for a repetitive motion injury!

Stop every 10-15 minutes and flex your hands, arms, etc. Do a few little stretching exercises and relax those muscles BEFORE they start cramping.

Pandaseatbamboo
01-24-2008, 07:36 PM
I use ginger (tea, ginger brew, or in capsule form) which really works well for me. Also when I started learning to knit I was telling my teacher my wrists/hands hurt a lot when I draw or sew so she taught me combination method which works great!
Good luck!

suzeeq
01-24-2008, 10:30 PM
All of the above and don't hold the needles and yarn so tight. We tend to tense up when we're focused on something and in learning a new skill probably even more so. Take breaks, minerals are good - magnesium is a natural muscle relaxer - and do stretches. Not just your hands, but wrist, arms, shoulders, upper back and neck. They all tend to get tight.

Becky Morgan
01-24-2008, 10:56 PM
Yes, move around! Take breaks, shift positions in your chair, change seats, but don't sit in one position. That encourages clenching the needles really tight and all that bad things that come with that, just as Sue said. It's not good for your gauge, either :D

photolady
01-30-2008, 02:29 PM
If you're knitting in the same position for an hour or more without a break, you're asking for a repetitive motion injury!

Stop every 10-15 minutes and flex your hands, arms, etc. Do a few little stretching exercises and relax those muscles BEFORE they start cramping.


That's what I do now. I stop after about 20-30 minutes.
I figured out I got the "injury" while using dull scissors cutting fabric.

I also go to the gym, and use a few machines, to stretch out my arms, shoulders, and strengthen my hands, arms, and shoulders.
I flexed and exercised this morning, BEFORE knitting.

photolady
01-30-2008, 02:30 PM
I use ginger (tea, ginger brew, or in capsule form) which really works well for me. Also when I started learning to knit I was telling my teacher my wrists/hands hurt a lot when I draw or sew so she taught me combination method which works great!
Good luck!

what's the combination method she taught you?

photolady
01-30-2008, 02:33 PM
For a few days, I couldn't knit at all.

Then, i exercised, and knitted for a few minutes a day, and now, I can
knit for about an hour and a half, (in 30 minute increments), without
getting any irritation.

The gym is helping a lot. I didn't realize how much flexibility I had lost in my arms. Bad to just give up exercising, after age 50.
Now, I try to work from the top down, every day, with exercises.

Getting older is not easy. More maintenance.

knittingymnast
01-30-2008, 07:51 PM
i really dont know, but I get cramps in my shoulder. (what the.....?)