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photolady
02-01-2008, 11:56 PM
I have a disabled, single friend who is
going into the hospital in March, and I'm trying to put a little gift box together, for her, to cheer her up. She's very anxious about going into the hospital. She has no one really to take care of her, full time, when she's recuperating.
Can you, or any of you, suggest some items I might mail to her,
to cheer her up, and take her mind off her worries?
What would you put together for a friend who was going to have to spend time in the hospital, and at home recuperating?
What things would you send her? She's about 50, deaf, and disabled.

auburnchick
02-02-2008, 12:00 AM
Can she watch TV with closed captions? What about a few movies on DVD? How about a comfy body pillow or new slippers/socks? Can she do any crafts? Maybe a few books by her favorite author(s)? Does she have any favorite treats that will be allowed while she's in the hospital?

vaknitter
02-02-2008, 11:27 AM
The times I've been in the hosp or home sick for any period of time I find I have a short attention span (normally could read or knit for hours) so I keep a stash of word search, crossword and soduku books on hand along with a stash of magazines I normally wouldn't read. Hard candy - peppermints (love the big Life Savers) and jolly ranchers stuff like that to suck on when the tummy's not feeling great or I'm really not hungry too.
If you have time you could knit her a lap quilt or a prayer shawl.
I would imagine just a lovely card letting your friend know you are thinking about her would be great too.

Denise in Michigan
02-02-2008, 01:52 PM
pre-moistened towelettes individually wrapped (good for when you need to wash your hands and are too tired to get up, just pop several in your pocket for later)
small sizes of scented hand lotions (provides a pampering lift and can be applied more frequently than cologne)
an insulated mug, or an insulated carafe
lip balm
a lightweight, inexpensive bracelet with an attached heart charm (include a note saying that each time she looks at the heart, you will be thinking of her)
a small "indoor" scarf to keep the chill from her neck and/or head while she's sitting still (something in cheery colors or her favorite colors)
small packets of tissues that fit in her pocket
something that she can "hold onto" during those times she needs contact, like a small stuffed animal (depending upon your relationship with her, this could even be something like a special smooth stone you've chosen for her, a cross or other faith-based icon, etc.)
brief notes that she is to open, one each day, in which you recall things you've done together, conversations you've had, and things that make you think of her
Contact the hospital she's going to and ask for ideas based upon her condition/surgery that would make her more comfortable in the hospital and once she's homeAnd my last idea fits in your heart, not in a box. Learn as much about what she is going through as you can. Share her difficult time by being there for her. Listen to her. Don't be afraid of saying the wrong thing, or of listening too closely. Be patient with her moods and her fears.

nonny2t
02-02-2008, 04:27 PM
I spent 2 weeks in the hospital in October and am facing surgery again in April. These are the things that I loved having. Some may be repeats of others who posted but these were my had to haves.

books, magazines, puzzle books like crosswords or a variety puzzle book

ink or mechanical pens for the above remember she won't be able to sharpen a pencil

nice flavored lip balm a must must must

hand cream a must must must

little hard candies she can suck on like butterscotch or those sour candies

chewing gum

those little slipper socks (they are great to wear all the time to keep your feet warm in bed and for walking the halls)

Crystal light or flavored drink packets for her water (if she isn't diabetic or restricted that is) It is a nice change from plain water and you still get your water in that way

Bath samples like shampoo and such if she is going to be able to bathe. I couldn't bathe because I had a stupid ng tube in and one of the worst things for me was having nasty hair The stuff they provide is always cheap so a nice brand of shampoo, conditioner, soap and such is always welcome.

hand towelettes or the sample bottles of the antibacterial hand wash. I really valued this when I had a bed side toilet and couldn't wash my hands or reach the foam cleaner while I still had the ng tube in

Little clips to pull back her hair, scrunchies or whatever to make her hair more comfortable and keep it out of her face

put all the personal in a nice little cosmetic bag. I know that my stuff would roll off the table onto the floor all the time or I wouldn't be able to find what I wanted when I wanted it. This is especially when you can't get up and move around.

Shandeh
02-03-2008, 01:09 AM
I would recommend making sure the items are small, travel size. It's a pain trying to keep up with lots of full-size items in that little table that hangs over the hospital bed. A tiny cosmetic bed with travel-size items would work perfectly.

I didn't read what everyone else recommended, but one of the things I wished for in the hospital was a tiny flashlight. Sometimes you want just a little bit of light, instead of illuminating the entire bed with the overhead light.

Another thing I would have liked would be an inflatable pillow. Sometimes, the hospital pillows are just not firm enough.

And, it would have been nice to have an extra friend or two at the hospital with me on the day I checked out. I had lots of flowers and cards and stuff to carry out to the car when I left, and it was a lot of work getting it all together to leave. I was EXHAUSTED before I got home.

photolady
02-07-2008, 11:27 AM
Can she watch TV with closed captions? What about a few movies on DVD? How about a comfy body pillow or new slippers/socks? Can she do any crafts? Maybe a few books by her favorite author(s)? Does she have any favorite treats that will be allowed while she's in the hospital?


She can crochet. I did knit her some slipper socks in her favorite color, and sent them to her. I also sent her some yarn, and crochet needles.
I need to find out what her favorite treats are.
Thanks for the suggestions!!
I'm so worried about her!

photolady
02-07-2008, 11:28 AM
I would recommend making sure the items are small, travel size. It's a pain trying to keep up with lots of full-size items in that little table that hangs over the hospital bed. A tiny cosmetic bed with travel-size items would work perfectly.

I didn't read what everyone else recommended, but one of the things I wished for in the hospital was a tiny flashlight.

A FLASHLIGHT! What a good idea! I did get together some of the travel sized things.

photolady
02-07-2008, 11:30 AM
I spent 2 weeks in the hospital in October and am facing surgery again in April. These are the things that I loved having. Some may be repeats of others who posted but these were my had to haves.

books, magazines, puzzle books like crosswords or a variety puzzle book

ink or mechanical pens for the above remember she won't be able to sharpen a pencil

nice flavored lip balm a must must must

hand cream a must must must

little hard candies she can suck on like butterscotch or those sour candies

chewing gum

those little slipper socks (they are great to wear all the time to keep your feet warm in bed and for walking the halls)

Crystal light or flavored drink packets for her water (if she isn't diabetic or restricted that is) It is a nice change from plain water and you still get your water in that way

Bath samples like shampoo and such if she is going to be able to bathe. I couldn't bathe because I had a stupid ng tube in and one of the worst things for me was having nasty hair The stuff they provide is always cheap so a nice brand of shampoo, conditioner, soap and such is always welcome.

hand towelettes or the sample bottles of the antibacterial hand wash. I really valued this when I had a bed side toilet and couldn't wash my hands or reach the foam cleaner while I still had the ng tube in

Little clips to pull back her hair, scrunchies or whatever to make her hair more comfortable and keep it out of her face

put all the personal in a nice little cosmetic bag. I know that my stuff would roll off the table onto the floor all the time or I wouldn't be able to find what I wanted when I wanted it. This is especially when you can't get up and move around.

I hope your surgery goes well, and you recover quickly, first of all!
This is a great list of things! I didn't think of hair clips! and some antibacterial wash! Wow, what good ideas! I'll be taking ALL these ideas with me to the store today, God willing.

photolady
02-07-2008, 11:32 AM
pre-moistened towelettes individually wrapped (good for when you need to wash your hands and are too tired to get up, just pop several in your pocket for later)
small sizes of scented hand lotions (provides a pampering lift and can be applied more frequently than cologne)
an insulated mug, or an insulated carafe
lip balm
a lightweight, inexpensive bracelet with an attached heart charm (include a note saying that each time she looks at the heart, you will be thinking of her)
a small "indoor" scarf to keep the chill from her neck and/or head while she's sitting still (something in cheery colors or her favorite colors)
small packets of tissues that fit in her pocket
something that she can "hold onto" during those times she needs contact, like a small stuffed animal (depending upon your relationship with her, this could even be something like a special smooth stone you've chosen for her, a cross or other faith-based icon, etc.)
brief notes that she is to open, one each day, in which you recall things you've done together, conversations you've had, and things that make you think of her
Contact the hospital she's going to and ask for ideas based upon her condition/surgery that would make her more comfortable in the hospital and once she's homeAnd my last idea fits in your heart, not in a box. Learn as much about what she is going through as you can. Share her difficult time by being there for her. Listen to her. Don't be afraid of saying the wrong thing, or of listening too closely. Be patient with her moods and her fears.

Oh, what loving ideas! Thanks so much. Am writing these down.

photolady
02-07-2008, 11:34 AM
The times I've been in the hosp or home sick for any period of time I find I have a short attention span (normally could read or knit for hours) so I keep a stash of word search, crossword and soduku books on hand along with a stash of magazines I normally wouldn't read. Hard candy - peppermints (love the big Life Savers) and jolly ranchers stuff like that to suck on when the tummy's not feeling great or I'm really not hungry too.
If you have time you could knit her a lap quilt or a prayer shawl.
I would imagine just a lovely card letting your friend know you are thinking about her would be great too.
Thanks so much! I've sent her 2 cards, and will be in touch with her, if she can get her little deaf person computer working in the hospital.
Sorry, I forgot what it's called...tty??

cftwo
02-07-2008, 02:36 PM
My dad had gallbladder surgery last January and was in the hospital for a week (he was really really sick). The first few days, all he wanted to do was sleep, but he did ask us to get him some slippers (ones that slipped on, so he didn't have to bend over to reach his feet), some nail clippers, and some sweats. Since his surgery was abdominal surgery, we made sure to get him some fleece jackets he didn't have to pull over his head. We also got him some puzzle books and mechanical pencils for when he started to feel a little better, and my mom got him some flowers (but I think those were more for her to feel good than for my dad). He also got a lot of phone calls since our family is scattered all over the place and no one lives close, so making sure she has her TTY (is that the right name?) would be a good idea. I know he enjoyed those phone calls from my sisters. But he really was mostly interested in sleeping those first few days. Even when he got home, he was sleeping a lot, and couldn't go back to work for a month (and even then he took lots of naps). He had internet access at home, and I think that entertained him a lot once he left the hospital.

His biggest concern once he got home? That he hadn't been able to shave in over a week and that he hadn't had good food since a few days before he went into the hospital. If she'll have problems getting around after she gets home, I bet it would be a godsend to have some dinners delivered. We have Schwan's here that delivers meals. http://www.schwans.com/