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carambula
03-11-2008, 09:29 PM
I am new to knitting and Crocheting .... today I went to Hobby Lobby to get some supplies to try to learn something but I was confused with all of the sizes and selections.. I have ZERO experience with any of this but would LOVE to learn.. It has been a dream of mine to learn these two crafts and I am hoping I can get some help on :

1. Supplies needed like needles , yarn etc
2. patterns , easy for beginners
3. videos on how to's..

I know this is asking alot but I would sure appreciate it.. thanks so much!:grphug:

Cindy:hug:

Knitting_Guy
03-11-2008, 09:35 PM
I think the easiest way to start is to get yourself some size 10 knitting needles and some worsted weight yarn.

Learn how to cast on. Learn and practice the knit stitch, then learn and practice the purl stitch.

Start out without trying to actually make anything. Just practice your stitches until you're comfortable with them. Then do something simple like a garter stitch scarf. It's a long enough project to allow you to not only practice but to actually see your improvement as it goes along.

Hope that helps a little.

knit2btied
03-11-2008, 09:36 PM
Welcome to knitting and crocheting as well as to KH. Check out the videos on the KH home page http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/learn-to-knit

So for knitting a good start would be a worsted weight yarn that is fairly smooth and light enough to see the stitches and needles between size 8 -10 seem to be the recommendation. Just start out knitting a swatch and practice getting even stitches. When you feel ready you could knit a simple project of your choice.

Hope that helps!

Knitting_Guy
03-11-2008, 09:36 PM
Oh, and don't worry about trying to make it perfect. Just keep knitting away and that will come on it's own.

sheknits
03-11-2008, 09:44 PM
When I first started to knit, I was really uptight about getting it "right" ... and that made me nuts. I did a lot better when I got myself some "practice" yarn that I didn't care that much about, and I gave myself permission to really go for it! After lots of knitting and unraveling (and a fair amount of profanity), I'd made a very uneven, strange-looking garter stitch scarf ... and I had gained enough confidence to work on a project using yarn I thought was actually pretty! :)

vaknitter
03-11-2008, 10:31 PM
Personally, I would get size 9 needles, cotton yarn, and start with dishcloths. I still find them to be a great way to learn new stitches and patterns. Cotton yarn (like Peaches & Cream) is cheap and often on sale and dishcloths are a project you can start and finish in a weekend and then have a useable project as well. After all - a person only needs so many scarves : )

happy knitting

saracidaltendencies
03-11-2008, 10:41 PM
I learned to knit on size 9 bamboo needles and worsted weight yarn. In the beginning, you don't really need much, basically just a ball/skein/hank of yarn and a set of needles. At first I didn't make anything but swatches, until I was comfortable enough with the knit stitch and then I tried my hand at a garter stitch scarf. Once I completed that and felt confident enough, I learned to purl...I just made a bunch of scarves and swatches until I was really comfortable with both stitches and then made swatches using both stitches. Any time I got hung up on anything, I watched Amy's videos, needles and yarn in hand and followed right along...lol...I don't think I could ever thank Amy and Debbie Stoller (Stitch n Bitch books author) enough!

carambula
03-11-2008, 10:42 PM
thanks guys... I did find different types of 10'' needles... what will the packaging say? are they supposed to be 5mm, 6.5mm , 6mm??

knit2btied
03-11-2008, 10:44 PM
That would be US size 10 the mm size is for those who are on the metric system, the size 10 for those in the USA.

carambula
03-11-2008, 10:46 PM
got it! Thanks... what about what type ? Plastic, alum,wood,bamboo?

Becky Morgan
03-11-2008, 10:50 PM
Don't worry abbout the exact size of the needles yet. 10" refers to the length, and the, there's a size number on all of them that refers to how thick they are. Some of us would go with a 9, some a 10, but it doesn't matter a whole lot. Just grab a pair that feels right in your hands and some smooth, light-colored yarn (so you can see your stitches.) It won't take you long to catch on. There are several ways to knit, so check out the videos here and see what suits YOU.

When you want to crochet, I'd suggest you get a J hook (some people like smaller sizes, some bigger; I'm aiming for the middle again.) You might want to buy an "in-line" Susan Bates or Crystalites hook *and* a Boye hook, since some people like one kind and some the other (don't buy a whole set until you know which YOU like!)

Most of all, don't worry about it. It isn't rocket science and it IS going to work.

knit2btied
03-11-2008, 10:50 PM
That will be personal preference, but I would suggest starting with aluminum. As you go, you can try different kinds. Plastic, wood, and bamboo all have a slightly clingy tendency that aluminum doesn't have.

annomalley
03-11-2008, 10:52 PM
I started on some aluminum needles that I "inherited" with a sewing machine. Some people recommend wood needles for beginners because they grab onto the yarn more than metal and you're less likely to drop stitches that way. I had no problems with the aluminum ones as a beginner. Try different ones and see which ones you like the best. The best needles are the ones that work the best for you.

Don't worry about being perfect right now. Learn the "how to" first and then the rest will come to you. :)

saracidaltendencies
03-11-2008, 10:53 PM
Honestly, I think it's down to personal preference there. I've heard the bamboo needles are great for beginners because the yarn doesn't slide on them as much as aluminum, but, if you're a really tight knitter, the bamboo might not be as good to start with as aluminum. Like I said, I started with bamboo, and, while I love them now, at first they were kind of tough for me because I was knitting too tightly and the yarn wasn't sliding easily so it made it really difficult for me to get the needle through the stitches. I got a pair of aluminum 10's, and, it made it much easier for me. But, as I said, I think it's really down to preference. You may want to try getting a couple pairs of needles, a pair of bamboo, aluminum, etc. and see which you like best.

carambula
03-11-2008, 11:04 PM
thanks for all the great advice.. sorry if I sould too meticioulus I just wanted to make sure when I go back to the store I am not LOST again... I am going to see what my walmart has in selection, our Hobby Lobby seemed really low on needle selection and not very organized.. they did have a GREAT variety of yarn and such so I will go back for that..thanks again!

The.Knitter
03-11-2008, 11:17 PM
It would be 6mm or US size 10 needles. The material for the needle goes by preference. Some people prefer metal needles, some plastic, some wood, some bamboo. I would say for your first project not to spend too much money on the needles. I started out with metal needles. If you are buying these supplies at a local yarn shop (LYS) perhaps you could ask the sales clerk if you could take them out of the package and see what feels best in your hands.

The people here have given you good advice. The only thing I want to add is to buy light coloured yarn (any worsted weight yarn will do). It is easier to see the different stitches if your yarn is light in colour.

Good luck and welcome to KH!

Koehnae
03-11-2008, 11:35 PM
I just wanted to add the suggestion of SOLID light color to the advice above. My grandma tried knitting the first time with a multi-color yarn and got so frustrated because she had trouble seeing stitches.

cam90066
03-12-2008, 01:38 AM
If you have access to a yarn shop, stop in and see if they'll let you try out diff ndls. What works for one person might not be your cup of tea. Depending on your budget, avoid getting sucked into buying something you don't want but testing your options might save you money in the long run.

cam

tokmom
03-12-2008, 01:44 AM
What they said.:) The knitting video's here saved my life. I'm the type of person that needs to see it done irl and I'd knit along as well.
I started out in September with swatches, moved to dishcloths and nnow am doing socks. :cheering:
Enjoy your new hobby and I hope to see another newbie knitter around.:cool:

Pagan Princess
03-12-2008, 03:17 AM
I think just do what you're doing, start with the basics and ask around. Most LYS's will be more than happy to give you advice.

Happy knitting!

Ellieblue
03-12-2008, 07:01 PM
Here's another suggestion about your needles. try to buy the shortest you can find. Long needles are like long skis, hard to control. Or better yet start out with a 24" circular - easy to use and this way you won't be dropping your loose needle. Ellie