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sheena193
03-26-2008, 06:00 AM
Hi,

I am a new knitter and my patterns says to YO as the first stitch on the row. I am not sure how to do this since there are not any stitches on the right needle. I understand how to do it if there are stitches already there on the right needle. Any suggestions on what I am doing wrong?

Thanks

suzeeq
03-26-2008, 11:57 AM
Just loop the yarn around your right needle and work the first stitch.

Jan in CA
03-26-2008, 12:38 PM
You just do it the same way by bringing the yarn to the front then knit.

What are you making? I always wonder why they would want you to do this.

Mirl56
03-26-2008, 05:03 PM
Yes, what are you making? I've noticed people ask before how to do it, but I've never made anything that asks for it.

sheena193
03-26-2008, 06:02 PM
I am making a scarf - The Road Scarf from Lion Brand (#70023). It has several stitches to it - basket weave, mesh, sugar cubes and seed. The mesh is the one that requires the *YO, k2t0g; repeat from *. This is my second knitting project so I am very excited.

Thank you everyone for your responses!

Knit4Pie
03-26-2008, 08:29 PM
As you see in the pattern, there's a note that says

"NOTE: EVERY ROW OF ENTIRE SCARF PATTERN BEGINS AND ENDS WITH A KNIT 4, TO CREATE GARTER STITCH BORDER."

So even though the pattern begins with a yo, you have the k4 before it. The row can be interpreted as: k4, *yo, k2tog, rep from * to last 4 sts, k4

sheena193
03-28-2008, 08:04 PM
oh my gosh, I totally missed that! At least the basket stitch had K4 for each row. So I should be ok! Thanks so much...I have to pay better attention.

Knit4Pie
03-28-2008, 08:16 PM
You're very welcome, glad I could help.

38lasalle
09-24-2011, 05:19 AM
See more notes in below (((((((((( )))))))), Sheena; I have a niece named Sheena! @@

Your ultimate answer is way below, but read on here as we have a situation. My info is good training, too for anyone who might also read this.

Thank you for indicating knitting, too as I get questions all the time in a mixed forum where they don't say: Knit, crochet, loom, machined..............................I crochet, too; 1973. K; 1970; A collector, too and will open a LYS late in 2012.

Hi,

I am a new knitter and my patterns says to YO as the first stitch on the row. I am not sure how to do this since there are not any stitches on the right needle.

((((((( Okie, first......you don't need a stitch on the side to do a YO. You can YO at the end, too..but when you turn, it's there at the beginning! LOL!! Take your pick, eh? @@ )))))))))))

I understand how to do it if there are stitches already there on the right needle. Any suggestions on what I am doing wrong?

(((((( You just didn't know how and I'm hoping you tried often as hands on a problem - right then and there - keep trying makes us better crafters.

But a simple answer won't be: Just loop over......AS.........you didn't give me enough information; If I had your whole pattern row, I could go further. Here's the but:

If the stitch after the YO is a K stitch, you'd do it one way.

If the stitch after the YO is a P stitch, you'd do it another way.

There are nine (9) knitting methods, too so I don't know which one you do, and sometimes..........sometimes.......some answers will need to be written for left-handed or righthanded. We're in a global venue here;

What if you were one of these nine (9) method knitters?

English throwing; Peruvian throwing
Continental (German) picking
Combined Continental (German + the Russian purl through the
front)
Portuguese or Turkish
Russian
Norweigian
Combined continental
Eastern continental
Reverse eastern continental
..........You can have the yarn in the front '''all''' the time to K & P.
You can have your yarn in back all the time to K & P.
You can mix it front/back.
You can loop the yarn over the needle clockwise or counter
clockwise.

It gets complicated, too.

A YO looks a little different, too if you have your yarn tensioned or un-tensioned.

With nine knitting methods and guessing that you are whatever, I could write your answer like this:

You knit Reverse Eastern continental method
You're left-handed
Your yarn will be tensioned
The next stitch is a P
...Make sure we don't get twisted stitches

Chances are that you are:

English thowing
Right handed
Your yarn isn't tensioned as you set up
The next stitch is not a purl but a K.

Continental will be accomplished the same but the tensioned working yarn is in the other hand (left), looks different but accomplishes the same, so I'd write the answer with that set up.

I just answered this question over on knitting paradise, too and wrote it for her in chart format, SWATCHING it, too over about 8 rows to see what was up. I don't answer but what I just sit right here and work it.

You won't find one video, either that tells it all. I should make one! LOL!

Now, don't be freeked out. The how to is rather simple - what stymies us is.....woah.......this is weird......and it rather is..... as it just isn't seen often and you are an early knitter, etc.

What's going on with this technique if that you're developing a neat selvage (edge) stitch and you are increasing at the same time ''''up into a 'V' or a triangle ''' , and I'm guessing you are making a '''shawl''' but it could be a small shawl that would also make a head or neck scarf - like a bandana. Or you might be shaping an item. Betch a cough-a-cuppy you are making a shwal. @@

A common placement of a YO is indeed within the row, making a new stitch and a lace hole, too.

In this case, your lace hole is on the side and makes a pretty edge stitch as you get more rows. This is called a selvage or edge stitch.

Here's my answer and set up with what I chose for the poster over yonder:

Right hander;
English knitting (throwing);
Untensioned yarn;
Row 1: YO, K1
*** Use a good tension here each time as they can get floppy.

Right needle goes:
from the front under yarn.
K 1
..............You're done.

It's an increase;
One st is now two.
Loop on side = pretty.

Tensioned yarn:

Where's your needle? Right needle in front of yarn?
Needle goes under to back of yarn;
K1.
.............Same thing untensioned as above but keep
your needle is front ; It can get to the back and just
look different - it will come out OK, but you might get
confused; Just be consistent, eh, until you get a
feel for this.

*** No twisted sts be it front/back work = Great! LOL!

*** If you try to purl in this position, your YO isn't there and you
will see that in a heart beat; We'd need to write this otherwise. Look for two stitches out of one.

Continental looks different but the effect it the same. If you need me to write it, I could.

If you're left handed or using other knitting methods, I could write those, too AND write it if your first stitch after the YO is a Purl and not a K.

Donna Rae
24 Sept 2011

You may call me eventually, too if you'd ever like - we could swap out telly #s via whatever.......
@@,./';,./'; Cro-knit bug = gotta get one! LOL!! )))))))))

Thanks

((((((( YW! Thanks for reading this; I find that printing something like this out is nice.; Cut as needed.

If anyone wants a darned good description of the nine knitting methods, hail me up in e-mail. I may not get back to this site for awhile;

It took me a year and a half to find them and learn them and time to edit, etc. I'm weak at Portuguese and the Norweigian purl = not a good video.

Link to my info not allowed! :yay: Okie.........To copy and paste my info - I'll do it in a supporting/following post.

Also, there are supporting videos for these; If you google Geek and Weird knitting, you'll find those, too but they're just English throwing. LOL!:roflhard:

The world's faster knitter can be googled and a gal knitting with 1,000 strands of yarn at the same time = What? LOL!!

fatoldladyinpjs
09-24-2011, 11:12 AM
Loop the yarn over the right hand needle. Hold the yarn over in place on top of the right needle with your right index finger and make the first stitch. Try to pull the yarn tightly until the first stitch is made. Then you can relax and do the rest of the row. This is assuming you're a Continental knitter. If you're an English style knitter, you may have to hold the yo with your left index finger from behind the needle.