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letsknit
04-25-2008, 02:53 AM
Hello everyone. I just have a few questions. I have been practicing knitting with just one skein of yarn that I got from Joannes. I know that it will take time for me to get the tension down so that my gauge will be equal, but whenever I get to the end of my row, the last stich is always HUGE and my side edges look deformed. How can I keep my end stiches from being bigger than the rest of the object?

I am also curious about the differences in yarn weight. I have always known about worsted weight, but now I am seeing that there are a TON more types of weights. What is the difference and why would you use one yarn as opposed to another? TIA for your advice. I'm sure I'll be back with a ton more questions.

Ingrid
04-25-2008, 07:01 AM
The loose end stitch is very common. You can slip the first stitch without knitting it for a smoother edge, or just make sure that you knit the first and second stitch on the next row tightly so that the loose one from the previous row kind of wraps around the needle and tightens up.

Yarn weight has to do with the thickness of the yarn. Worsted is the most common, but there are some that are very thin that you might use for socks or traditional Fair Isle sweaters, and there are thick, bulky yarns for quick knits.

There are a gazillion patterns out there, and there are a gazillion yarns to go with them. You'll get to know them.:thumbsup:

cam90066
04-25-2008, 11:58 AM
When you're knitting you're creating fabric. Look at pieces of apparel you own. Heavy denim works for your jeans but you wouldn't want the tee you wear with them made from the same fabric. A winter coat functions well made most likely from a sturdy wool but you wouldn't make a baby's pajamas with it.

Every yarn has its own properties and uniqueness...color, wash/dry (care) features, drape, lustre, stitch definition, softness, durability, etc. There are pros/cons to using certain yarns for certain projects. It's always unfortunate when an item looks great but the yarn used wasn't intended for this purpose. (For ex: a baby sweater in 'hand wash, cold, lay flat to dry' yarn that a busy mom put in a hot washer/dryer and now fits a Barbie doll.)

cam

letsknit
04-25-2008, 12:32 PM
When you're knitting you're creating fabric. Look at pieces of apparel you own. Heavy denim works for your jeans but you wouldn't want the tee you wear with them made from the same fabric. A winter coat functions well made most likely from a sturdy wool but you wouldn't make a baby's pajamas with it.

Every yarn has its own properties and uniqueness...color, wash/dry (care) features, drape, lustre, stitch definition, softness, durability, etc. There are pros/cons to using certain yarns for certain projects. It's always unfortunate when an item looks great but the yarn used wasn't intended for this purpose. (For ex: a baby sweater in 'hand wash, cold, lay flat to dry' yarn that a busy mom put in a hot washer/dryer and now fits a Barbie doll.)

cam

That was a great explaination and it makes perfect sense! I didn't even realize that was the difference. I always thought yarn was yarn. I can see that I am in trouble...I see an addiction forming...:woot:

Plantgoddess+
04-25-2008, 12:39 PM
Here's some links to help you with the various weights and constructions of yarn.
http://www.yarnfwd.com/tension.html
http://www.yarndex.com/
http://www.knitty.com/issuefall05/FEATwhyply.html
http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEwinter03/FEATwin03TBP.html
http://knittingcrochet.suite101.com/article.cfm/yarnweight

heatherg23
04-25-2008, 12:58 PM
My edges were horrible at first but the one thing that completely turned it around was by tugging the yarn before I put it around the needle. Especially the first and last stitch. That will clean up your edges.Also, The first stitch will always be loose.

Heather

suzeeq
04-25-2008, 01:19 PM
Actually, it kind of works better to make the first stitch, then pull on the yarn. It takes up the extra yarn in both the first st as well as the last one below it.

MAmaDawn
04-25-2008, 01:52 PM
Sue that just what I was going to say to do.

And here is another site that will help with yarn weights....

http://www.yarnstandards.com/weight.html

Knitting_Guy
04-26-2008, 10:25 AM
As Ingrid suggests, I always knit the first two stitches tighter and that makes for a nice even edge.

selinechan
04-26-2008, 10:56 AM
Hello everyone. I just have a few questions. I have been practicing knitting with just one skein of yarn that I got from Joannes. I know that it will take time for me to get the tension down so that my gauge will be equal, but whenever I get to the end of my row, the last stich is always HUGE and my side edges look deformed. How can I keep my end stiches from being bigger than the rest of the object?

I am also curious about the differences in yarn weight. I have always known about worsted weight, but now I am seeing that there are a TON more types of weights. What is the difference and why would you use one yarn as opposed to another? TIA for your advice. I'm sure I'll be back with a ton more questions.
After I learnt to slip the first stitch without knitting, my edges have become far prettier. Isn't knitting a wonderful addiction? :D

cindycactus
04-26-2008, 11:18 AM
I also slip the first stitch in every row. Nice neat edges.:knitting: