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Terrycap
04-29-2008, 12:59 PM
Hi There!

I am a new knitter and am absolutely hooked! We are traveling in a few weeks and I am already thinking about a good project to work on. It dawned on me that due to safety issues they may not allow knitting needles on the plane with me. Can anyone advise me on this subject? Would circular needles be okay? I don't want to get to the front of the line and have them taken away. I can't imagine not knitting while sitting idol for so long.

Thanks!
Terrycap

knitasha
04-29-2008, 01:09 PM
Here are current regulations for flights within the U.S.
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/assistant/editorial_1252.shtm

Note that any agent at any airport can confiscate knitting needles, scissors, etc., at their own discretion. Bamboo or plastic circs seem to be safest; scissors should be the kindergarten type, less than 4" long and with blunt tips. I haven't had any problems in the last couple of years, but but I still put my knitting on a piece of waste yarn before going through security just in case. If you have Denise interchangeables, they're great for traveling.

HOWEVER: none of the above applies to flights outside the US Heathrow Airport in London is especially tough. Check with your airline before traveling outside the US, but remember that regulations can change from day to day.

PS: Some people suggest carrying a self-addressed envelope so you can send your needles home if they don't make it through security. Fine, if you want to go to the back of the line, hunt down a mailbox and wait in line again. The TSA agents will NOT mail them for you.

suzeeq
04-29-2008, 01:46 PM
On domestic flights you're pretty safe, though wood or plastic needles might be easier than metal ones. And if you've already got a bit of it started, it definitely looks like a WIP. International flights have tougher regulations though, and it varies by airport.

ARiley
04-29-2008, 03:21 PM
This topic seems to come up regularly -- with the summer travel season upon us, maybe one of the moderators would make a sticky thread about it.

(I'll be stitching away on baby caps for charity on my travels this summer.)

heykaren
04-29-2008, 06:12 PM
I flew Valencia,Spain to Paris and then Detroit ( and then back ) at the beginning of april. I have plastic 10.5 needles with me and had absolutely NO problems in any of the airports. I was tempted to bring my Options, but was scared that they´d want to take them, so stuck with the plastic.

Karen

suzeeq
04-29-2008, 10:36 PM
I forgot to mention -- I think circulars look less threatening than straight needles. Though straights are probably no more deadly than a pen or pencil....

Cirrus
04-29-2008, 10:37 PM
I've never had any problem with knitting needles. However, I do find the needles of much length are difficult because the seating is so crowded. Double points or circs are better, if possible.

jess_hawk
04-30-2008, 02:59 AM
I've never had issues on domestic flights. I actually accidentally left ALL of my needles in my carry-on for my flights home from Alaska. Straights, circs, dpns. No problems. Still, I second the recommendations for using plastic or wooden circs. Not only because I feel that they would look less threatening, but also because of the space issue.
As mentioned, international flights are a different issue. Qantas, the big airline going to Australia from the US, lists knitting needles as a "dangerous item" not allowed in carry-ons. To be safe, I didn't try to press my luck with even wooden ones. I might call the airport on my way home and ask if wooden circs are allowed.

suewoz
05-01-2008, 12:37 AM
I knit on the plane with no difficulty. I use circular needles because i find straight needles cause me to bump the passenger next to me with my elbow :) Luckily it is usually dh. I have never been stopped at security.

hartleystudio
05-01-2008, 05:53 PM
I just flew on 4 planes and called ahead to check with the airline. I had no problem at all and even noticed that they let my scissors through! It is a small "squeeze" type, not an actual scissors but, still! The took my tiny keychain swiss army knife last time, I was so mad!!!

I think you are pretty safe with knitting needles, my biggest problem was my nervousness during flying caused me to really mess up my socks!!!!LOL!!!!:roflhard: I left all the mistakes as a reminder of my trip!

cacunn
05-03-2008, 01:26 PM
Would finger nail clippers work to replace scissor on airlines? I the fishing section of sporting goods stores they often carry, what is basically the cutting edges of the clippers with out the lever. These should allow you to cut thread with out being threating to DHS personnel.

http://image.basspro.com/images/images2/400-000/491-553-00.jpg

http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_29506_175003003_175000000_175003000_175-3-3

lisdip
05-03-2008, 05:45 PM
Hi, I fly to Italy every summer with my family to visit my husband's relatives and I always bring knitting projects of course. Last summer I checked the TSA website and they said it was OK to take needles on board. I took about 6 addi turbo circular needles in different sizes. When we arrive to Italy we had to change planes in Naples and they TOOK away my needles! I begged and cried and it was no use. When I arrived to my destination I purchased Italian needles (straight really long needles).

hartleystudio
05-03-2008, 09:24 PM
That is HORRIBLE!!!! I don't even have any needles that nice but I would have gone berserk!!! I am so sorry!!!!! My DH thinks that if you get something taken away at security that you should be able to pick something out on the other end. You know they have buckets of stuff that get taken away and what do they do with it???? I think he's right, if they are going to take away your knitting needles, the least they can do is give you a chance to dig around in stuff they confiscated from someone else!!!

Simply_Renee
05-05-2008, 10:16 AM
Good question and one I researched thoroughly because on the 27th I am off to London, Paris and Switzerland.

I will probably take 1 project on my harmony circs with me. Flying out of the US will probably not be a problem- knitting needles are on the approved list (with a note that TSA agents are allowed to decide against them at their own discretion.) Since I am flying out of London on the way back, I haven't decided whether or not to wear them as hair sticks (I have really long hair) or do the right thing and check them. Many people put them in with their pencils/pens and wood or plastic needles are not even noticed.

I hate the thought of having all that sitting around time with nothing to knit...

ETA getting to pick something on the other end- hilarious! I wonder what they do with all the contraband they confiscate. I hope it's donated or something and not just thrown out.

Alyce
05-05-2008, 10:30 AM
I recently flew from TN to Las Vegas. I had no trouble with my knitting needles (I took 2 projects with one on DPNs). They did confiscate a small bottle of hair goo because the bottle was more than 3oz. There was just a little left in the bottle so I thought it would pass. The guy asked me if I wanted to take it back to the car, but I let it go. I told him to take it home to his wife and he said they are not allowed to do that. I had no further problems when we returned.
Alyce

Abbily
05-06-2008, 10:32 AM
I flew from Austin to Portland, OR in Jan. and from Austin to Albuquerque this past weekend (and back, of course) and had no problems either time. I don't check luggage because I don't want it getting beat up or lost, so it's always either tucked into my carry-on suitcase, or just carried in my hand in my knitting bag. Either way I have never had anyone say anything, and I have traveled with plastic circs and wood and metal knitpicks circs.

ScrappingMommy71
05-06-2008, 03:42 PM
I had this same question before recently flying Detroit to Tampa. I asked and the 2 ladies who own the local yarn shop said they have never had any troubles. So I popped my stuff in a knitting bag to carry-on. I was working on a felted bag on circular addi's. No problems at all!

marypat
05-06-2008, 08:53 PM
Hi
I just checked with my neighbor who is a Supervisor for TSA.
He said that TSA allows knitting needles and scissors that comply with the requirements on the site. If they are a US airport they should all have the same guidelines. Also I found out that everything that is confiscated is sold in lots to jobbers who then sell most of it on E-Bay. The money that TSA gets for selling to the jobbers is donated to the state that the airport is in.

Simply_Renee
05-07-2008, 02:33 PM
Hi
I just checked with my neighbor who is a Supervisor for TSA.
He said that TSA allows knitting needles and scissors that comply with the requirements on the site. If they are a US airport they should all have the same guidelines. Also I found out that everything that is confiscated is sold in lots to jobbers who then sell most of it on E-Bay. The money that TSA gets for selling to the jobbers is donated to the state that the airport is in.
Thanks, I was curious about that.

What's a jobber?

crazyaboutknitting
05-07-2008, 02:36 PM
I tink they would alow wooden kneedles. Probably not double pionted kneedles.

cacunn
05-07-2008, 02:40 PM
Thanks, I was curious about that.

What's a jobber?

In this case a jobber is a middleman. They buy the product through auctions or sealed bid from the Government and then resells the items. They normally would purchase the items in lots that may or may not be sorted.

Simply_Renee
05-07-2008, 03:18 PM
In this case a jobber is a middleman. They buy the product through auctions or sealed bid from the Government and then resells the items. They normally would purchase the items in lots that may or may not be sorted.
Thanks- I learn new things all the time here, I tell ya!