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Mulderknitter
05-27-2008, 06:52 PM
Much like the new knitter, that has to frog a scarf 800 times, I am very frustrated with my spinning attempts. I seek help before the insanity takes over:clink:
I recently rec'd an ashford traditional from my mom. woo hoo! happy! Got the wheel operational after some hammering and such, (don't ask). but I am having serious tension and speed problems.
I get the tension right for the bobbin to take up, but it's too fast for me, the roving flies right thru my fingers and breaks. If I adjust the tension to be my speed (slow) the bobbin doesn't take up.
I understand that I am treadling too fast, but how do you slow down the treadle and keep the wheel moving??
argh:hair:

Liliyarn
05-28-2008, 02:43 AM
I'll make an attempt here to be helpful, but it's difficult for me when I can't see what is going on...
When I have issues with my wheel, I start from square one.
Scotch tension very loose. No take up on the bobbin.
I have a leader yarn that is long enough to play with.
I treadle as slow as I can possibly go and make the wheel go around.
Place the leader in your hand, but don't hold it.
Very small adjustments, very slowly adjust the scotch tension until the leader begins to move onto the bobbin.
The leader shouldn't ever fly out of your hand and you should be able to pull it back from the bobbin while treadling.

Keep adjusting until you find a speed that is good. I always treadle just enough to keep the wheel in motion. I let my whorls do the work, so I don't feel like I'm in a spinning wheel indy 500.

Hope others chime in with thier ideas.
But honestly it sounds as if you may not be drafting fast enough, treadling too fast, tension too tight and/ or too much twist in the single..or...?
What are you spinning? And how thick/ thin are your singles?

Mulderknitter
05-28-2008, 08:27 AM
Thanks for the reply!
I am "trying" to spin a single. I am very new. I guess it sounds like I really need to play with the tension more.
None of the You tube videos I saw were helpful.
thanks again!

bethany
05-28-2008, 08:49 AM
You can Park and draft on your wheel, like on your spindle. Treadle to get twist, then stop and let the twist travel down your fiber. Then treadle again to let the yarn wind on the bobbin, then do it again until you get the treadle speed down. (I like to treadle fast too!)

But it does sound like your tension may be too tight. Did you look here? http://www.joyofhandspinning.com/spin-set-tension.shtml My Lendrum lets me adjust tension and the mother of all too to help with that. Don't know about the Ashford Traditional though.....Good luck!

mullerslanefarm
05-28-2008, 10:47 AM
Just keep in mind that the first month or so of spinning is pure hell, after that, it's total zen.

I agree with Lili, back to square one - but I advise you go farther back.

Forget the fiber.... Get use to the treadle pattern of your Traddy. When your treadle reaches *just* past the highest point, press down with your toes and relax your ankle/foot to allow the wheel to rotate. Again, when the treadle reaches *just* past the highest point, press down with your toes and relax your ankle/foot. Repeat until you can keep the wheel going without thinking about it

Next, tie on some cheap yarn. Have your tension loose. Continue treadling and play with the tension so the yarn will wind on. Very minute adjustments can make a huge difference (we're talking 1/8 turn of the tension peg).

Make sure you are set up for Scotch tension (flyer lead, brake on bobbin) and not Irish tension (bobbin lead, brake on flyer).

Mulderknitter
05-28-2008, 10:50 AM
Just keep in mind that the first month or so of spinning is pure hell, after that, it's total zen.

I agree with Lili, back to square one - but I advise you go farther back.

Forget the fiber.... Get use to the treadle pattern of your Traddy. When your treadle reaches *just* past the highest point, press down with your toes and relax your ankle/foot to allow the wheel to rotate. Again, when the treadle reaches *just* past the highest point, press down with your toes and relax your ankle/foot. Repeat until you can keep the wheel going without thinking about it

Next, tie on some cheap yarn. Have your tension loose. Continue treadling and play with the tension so the yarn will wind on. Very minute adjustments can make a huge difference (we're talking 1/8 turn of the tension peg).

Make sure you are set up for Scotch tension (flyer lead, brake on bobbin) and not Irish tension (bobbin lead, brake on flyer).
Thanks for the advice on using some cheap yarn, that helps!
i will check the tension when i get home. how do i know the difference???:??

Shandeh
05-29-2008, 01:07 AM
I have a very old Ashford Traditional that I bought at a consignment store a couple years ago.

When I first started using it, I had the exact same problem you're having. I contacted a spinning store in my state, and she recommended that I get a "Maintenance Kit" for my wheel. BEST ADVICE I EVER GOT!!!

It cost less than 20 dollars, and provided everything I needed to replace the belt and screws, and oil all the spots that needed it. My wheel was like a completely different wheel after that little bit of work. Easy peasy. :thumbsup:

After using the maintenance kit, my wheel was MUCH easier to spin, and my tension was perfect. cloud9
http://www.mielkesfiberarts.com/images/ashford/main_kit.gif

mullerslanefarm
05-29-2008, 08:24 AM
Here is the Assembly Guide for the Traddie
http://www.ashford.co.nz/helpandadvice/TDSW.pdf
Make sure you are set up for Scotch tension (flyer lead, brake on bobbin) and not Irish tension (bobbin lead, brake on flyer).
From the Assembly Guide, it looks like you can only have a Scotch tension. A flyer lead is when the belt goes around the big wheel to the flyer. The brake band (tension) goes over the bobbin to gradually slow it down.

Mulderknitter
05-29-2008, 12:56 PM
Thank you everyone for your helpful posts!:muah: I actually just got the maintenance kit, and found that my band did not have a spring on it, so I added that and it helped.
I was able to play for about an hour last night, and my main frustration is the tension difference between getting it to take up and twist the yarn and overtwisting. I think for about 5 minutes there I got some perfect yarn. the other 55 minutes were fiddling with the knobs, reconnecting broken roving, over and over. And trying to keep my DH's hands off of it. He kept fiddling with stuff and messing me up. :hair: Then the cat ran away with some roving. :roflhard:

Shandeh
05-29-2008, 01:29 PM
Sounds exactly right. You're learning, and it will get better in time. :wink:

jeanius80
05-29-2008, 08:56 PM
Don't worry! Just spin a little everyday, maybe 15 minutes? I know even now I sometimes have days where the fiber wants to slide apart instead of join and the tension gets fiddly. Practice is best, and soon you'll know what to set your tension at to get the yarn you want :) Learn to use the different ratios on your wheel too, so that when you do want a tighter twist, you won't need to peddle like a madman ;)

there are some great groups on ravelry for spinners as well. just type in spinning in the group search and you should find a bunch! Everyone is really helpful and encouraging, plus you more likely to find a larger number of people who use the same wheel as you, which can be extra helpful :)

notaregift
05-29-2008, 10:28 PM
like what they say, practice makes perfect. i'm a newbie to knitting myself and i'm not that good either but i'm not giving up hope.

Jeremy
06-02-2008, 02:23 PM
I'm pretty new too. Sometimes its just your turn to spin cr#p. I do try to make adjustments in just one thing at a time and to be patient with my skills. Some fibers are more difficult to work with than others. I had a lot of trouble with some fiber that was really tough to draft until I learned how to spin from the fold. Worked wonderfully and made all the difference in my controlling the rate at which the fiber got twisted and pulled in.

Mulderknitter
06-02-2008, 03:36 PM
Sometimes its just your turn to spin cr#p.
Thanks I love that!:muah:

KnittinMitchie
06-06-2008, 12:28 PM
I bought a new tension spring to replace the old rubber bands I'd been using. BOY was there some MAJOR tweaking again to find my groove and get everything back to how I like it. Plus I hve a 3 yr old who likes to touch the wheel and she like to turn the knob that adjusts the mother of all