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fayola
05-31-2008, 12:54 AM
I am working on my first project (baby blanket) but didn't learn and now I feel very uncomfortable with wrapping the yarn around my finger when I am knitting. So it hangs loose and I just wrap it around depending on the stitch. Is this going to be a problem? Do I have to learn how to feel comfortable the other way?

Shandeh
05-31-2008, 01:10 AM
I am working on my first project (baby blanket) but didn't learn and now I feel very uncomfortable with wrapping the yarn around my finger when I am knitting. So it hangs loose and I just wrap it around depending on the stitch. Is this going to be a problem? Do I have to learn how to feel comfortable the other way?
Welcome to the forum! :)

The reason the yarn is wrapped around a finger is to give the yarn even tension when you're knitting. If the yarn is just hanging, then some of your stitches will be loose, and others will be tight.

Here is what my knitting looks like. I always wrap the yarn around my little finger:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/68/168045816_a6a961b331.jpg

Debkcs
05-31-2008, 01:34 AM
As Sandy said, if you don't wrap it around, or learn how to hold tension between your ring finger and little finger, your knitting probably won't look right.

There may be other ways to keep tension correct, but I think those are the two most used.

(Sandy, your sweater [?] does look perfect!)

iwouldratherbeknitting
05-31-2008, 06:43 AM
On the other side of the coin... I don't do anything but ' lightly grasp' the yarn in my right hand.. I do not wrap the yarn around any finger/etc. for tension.

AND, it's the way that I've done it since 1987... and I have no problems with my knitting. *I was taught by an Australian and I've been told that I do knit (hold the needles/etc) a little differently than most other Americans... but, all I know is that what I do does work for me.:happydance: AND, my knitting is pretty fast.. not having to constantly adjust the tension. My tension is even and I do not knit too tight or too loosely... it's just right (I sound like the 3 bears story) :D

HOWEVER, I do agree that 'most people' will need to manage some sort of system to control the tension and my method won't work for most people...

But, it is possible to knit successfully without wrapping the yarn around a finger or fingers for tension.

SBG
05-31-2008, 08:18 AM
I have never found a way to hold the working yarn consistently with English knitting that works for me. I haven't had a huge problem with tension inconstency either-I also just hold it in my hand loosely. I found that I have a much, much easier time with tension and holding the working yarn, and also much faster knitting, with continental knitting. It was awkward and hard at first, but I stuck with it because it looked so FAST in the videos. Now I rarely use English at all.

suzeeq
05-31-2008, 09:19 AM
I don't wrap it around a finger, but thread it through my fingers. It goes over the index, under the middle, over the ring finger and my little finger kind of curls around a little to grasp the end. I'm fairly fast that way too, and my hand doesn't totally leave the needle to wrap the yarn around the tip, my fingers just sort of flex out to flick it around. Try it different ways until you find one that gives you an even tension.

mwhite
05-31-2008, 09:41 AM
On the other side of the coin... I don't do anything but ' lightly grasp' the yarn in my right hand.. I do not wrap the yarn around any finger/etc. for tension.

AND, it's the way that I've done it since 1987... and I have no problems with my knitting. *I was taught by an Australian and I've been told that I do knit (hold the needles/etc) a little differently than most other Americans... but, all I know is that what I do does work for me.:happydance: AND, my knitting is pretty fast.. not having to constantly adjust the tension. My tension is even and I do not knit too tight or too loosely... it's just right (I sound like the 3 bears story) :D

HOWEVER, I do agree that 'most people' will need to manage some sort of system to control the tension and my method won't work for most people...

But, it is possible to knit successfully without wrapping the yarn around a finger or fingers for tension.

I knit the same way and don't have any tension problems. I think that it IS a matter of what's the most comfortable and functional for you.

jess_hawk
05-31-2008, 10:53 AM
I let my yarn hang loose and my knitting is typically VERY even/consistant.
I did originally learn to wrap the yarn, at age 8, but then didn't knit until much later and the diagrams I saw of how to correctly hold the yarn didn't make sense and I couldn't get a consistant guage.

Find something that works for you and do it. If you're consistant, whatever you do works fine. :)

heatherg23
05-31-2008, 12:44 PM
I am working on my first project (baby blanket) but didn't learn and now I feel very uncomfortable with wrapping the yarn around my finger when I am knitting. So it hangs loose and I just wrap it around depending on the stitch. Is this going to be a problem? Do I have to learn how to feel comfortable the other way?

You can knit which ever style your comfortable with.
I actually wrap the yarn around my index finger twice when I knit. Like you mentioned in your post. I place it one time at the beginning of my finger (closest to your wrist) and one below the knuckle (towards your finger nail). It gives great tension. I just use my the side of my thumb to control the tension. When i'm wrapping the yarn around the needle, to do a stitch, I have to loosen the tension by moving my thumb towards me. just a hair.My thumb just skimms the side of the yarn on my index finger. When you want complete tension just press your thumb against your index finger. The yarn won't move. I won't have any slack to worry about.

I didn't do this until a few weeks after i started knitting. I had severe carpal tunnel, due to knitting so I had to find a way not to use my individual fingers. The way I knit I use my entire hand in the process instead of just 1 finger. No more carpal tunnel!

Good luck
Heather

Shandeh
05-31-2008, 03:05 PM
(Sandy, your sweater [?] does look perfect!)
Thank you! Yes, it was my very first sweater, made with cheap cotton yarn. :teehee:
http://farm1.static.flickr.com/47/168045815_23a77fbcde_m.jpg

Try it different ways until you find one that gives you an even tension.
Exactly! :thumbsup: Try different things while you're still learning. You'll find the technique that works for you, and your knitting will be better and easier from then on. :)

Cirrus
05-31-2008, 03:30 PM
I hold the yarn with my right pointer finger and thumb, and it trails through the palm to the ball. I have to let go of the needles with my right hand to throw the stitch. Probably not the best or most efficient way to knit, but there's no changing it now! I learned to knit at Sears Roebuck years ago, and I cannot imagine that's how she taught us, but it's the way I do it now.

(I actually had to get out some knitting to see exactly how I did it.)

Previous poster with the cotton sweater--really, really nice. You can be proud of the work. Beautiful colors too.

iwouldratherbeknitting
05-31-2008, 05:26 PM
I'm glad to hear that there are at least a few of us 'tension rebels' out there... who don't use the fingers to control the tension. :woot: Made me feel not so 'different'...

I will say though that... when I teach someone how to knit. I do show them 'several ways' to hold the yarn for 'tension' control... let them try them and I also show them my methold..

which, truthfully is the only way that I show children- when I'm teaching them to knit and then when they get the knit sitch process down and learned- I show them how to wrap the yarn around their fingers... it's just too much in the beginning for them and most of them knit too tight to even put the needle in ... if you start out w/ the yarn tension around the fingers... it's too much for them to manage at first (at the hundreds that I've taught how to knit anyway) I'm an art teacher, so I have showed many, many children how to knit.

*Ok, I show adults this way too- but, they can catch on to the knitting process steps faster (usually) and then go straight to learning how to hold the yarn. It helps so much to eliminate that 'death hold' on the knitting stitches... that are so tight that it is almost impossible to get the next row of stitches done easily.


I just tell them that there is NO ONE way to hold the yarn for tension... that instead that they have to find the method that works for them.