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cheley
06-08-2008, 10:26 PM
Hi everyone...I am seeing some moths in my spare room where I "store" my yarn...alot of it (yarn) is just in "plastic bags"...I do not want to use "moth balls" cause then the yarn will smell like those:noway: so what do you guys use???? any thoughts? :hug:

KnittinMitchie
06-09-2008, 07:30 AM
you can use mint and lavender. I think there is something else but can't remember. Also moths normally eat wool, I know this first hand, since I lost one of my sweaters due to being eaten. FYI it is the larva of moths that eat your wool not the moths themselves. Also moth balls are toxic in general.

gingerbread
06-09-2008, 09:06 AM
I use Cedar blocks and it seems to be doing its job of keeping the moths out. No feast in my wool so far.:thumbsup:


:waving:

DorothyDot
06-09-2008, 09:10 AM
Yes, cedar wood is a natural moth repellant. You can get cedar chips in pet stores - it's used for like bedding and stuff, I believe. And of course, there is always the old-fashioned cedar chest that our grandmothers used.

Hope this helps,
Dot

gingerbread
06-09-2008, 09:11 AM
:oops: oops forgot, I put the blocks around the plastic bags not letting the blocks touch the wool. I don't want it to smell of the cedar if at possible. This seems to work for me.


:waving:

LilHuskiesFootBallMom
06-09-2008, 09:40 AM
whole cloves are supposed to work as well. i never bother as i have 5 cats and they think chasing (and eating) moths is fun....

Moxiemade
06-09-2008, 09:52 AM
I've heard that storing them with a strong scented soap works as well.

cheley
06-09-2008, 10:04 AM
Thanks for all the tips....I am going to go thru and make sure there is no larvae....does the "cedar" chips kill the larvae too????

Cynamar
06-09-2008, 10:20 AM
I've read that nettle is naturally pest-repellent. I want to get some nettle yarn to mix in my other in my stash.

gingerbread
06-09-2008, 10:21 AM
I don't think that the cedar kills the larva of the moths. It just keeps the moths away so they don't lay the eggs.:tap:
Although I might be wrong, but so far so good with my wool yarns. I always check for the buggers and they aren't anywhere around.



:waving:

1to1
06-09-2008, 11:31 AM
I remember reading somewhere that dryer sheets work but cant recall where I read it.

Ozma
06-09-2008, 03:28 PM
I was a textile/museum studies major in grad school, so we learned all about this...

The smell of cedar is a natural moth repellant, but it is not fool proof. If a moth larva has nothing else to eat, it will put up with the smell. Cedar (and other herbs) will also off-gas acids that can attack some yarns, though wool is least affected by acidic environments.

Keep cedar away from pets, since it is carcinogenic to them (not to people).

Moth balls are only a repellant and do not kill eggs or larvae, and the naptha they are made of is toxic.

Moth crystals (with PBD, or paradichlorabenzyne) are the only thing other than drycleaning that will kill eggs and larvae. Unfortunately, it is also toxic to people and pets.

Insect larvae that attack wool will also attack other protein-based fibers, such as silk, or feathers. The best way to keep them at bay is not to leave large piles of materials untouched for long periods of time. Inspect your collections frequently, especially in the spring, and kill any larvae you find. (The larvae will jump off objects when you shake them). Keep your storage areas clean and dust-free. Never store fibers without cleaning them first, since the larvae like cholesterol-laden wool best (perspiration is full of cholesterol).

Be sparing in your use of plastics bags, since they contain chemicals that will attack your yarns, and the plastic can trap moisture which may cause mold growth. Make yourself some cloth bags from unbleached muslin to store your yarn. They will breathe, and when they get dusty, you can wash them.

I brought home insect eggs when I worked at a museum that had a badly-stored collection that was infested. When I discovered the larvae in my own closet, I drycleaned almost all of our wool and silk clothing (drycleaning kills eggs and larvae). Anything that I could not dryclean, such as yarn, hats with feathers, etc., I put in garbage bags with moth crystals for a month, then vacuumed the items and put them back away after airing them out and cleaning the closet. I inspect everything three or four times a year, and this month, when I did my spring inspection , I only found 2 larvae, so I'm hoping that I'm almost rid of them. The key is to catch the larvae and kill them before they reproduce.

Wool moths are tiny and white. Any other kind of moth is not harming your wool. However, there are other species that attack protein fibers, such as carpet beetles and bookworms. I am still fighting a species of insect that I have not identified yet. Fortunately, they are not as destructive as wool moth larvae, and they seem to prefer dust bunnies to wool, but I did find the two this spring in our clothing, though they had not made any holes.

If I think of anything else, I will post again. :)

cheley
06-09-2008, 03:37 PM
I was a textile/museum studies major in grad school, so we learned all about this...

The smell of cedar is a natural moth repellant, but it is not fool proof. If a moth larva has nothing else to eat, it will put up with the smell. Cedar (and other herbs) will also off-gas acids that can attack some yarns, though wool is least affected by acidic environments.

Keep cedar away from pets, since it is carcinogenic to them (not to people).

Moth balls are only a repellant and do not kill eggs or larvae, and the naptha they are made of is toxic.

Moth crystals (with PBD, or paradichlorabenzyne) are the only thing other than drycleaning that will kill eggs and larvae. Unfortunately, it is also toxic to people and pets.

Insect larvae that attack wool will also attack other protein-based fibers, such as silk, or feathers. The best way to keep them at bay is not to leave large piles of materials untouched for long periods of time. Inspect your collections frequently, especially in the spring, and kill any larvae you find. (The larvae will jump off objects when you shake them). Keep your storage areas clean and dust-free. Never store fibers without cleaning them first, since the larvae like cholesterol-laden wool best (perspiration is full of cholesterol).

Be sparing in your use of plastics bags, since they contain chemicals that will attack your yarns, and the plastic can trap moisture which may cause mold growth. Make yourself some cloth bags from unbleached muslin to store your yarn. They will breathe, and when they get dusty, you can wash them.

I brought home insect eggs when I worked at a museum that had a badly-stored collection that was infested. When I discovered the larvae in my own closet, I drycleaned almost all of our wool and silk clothing (drycleaning kills eggs and larvae). Anything that I could not dryclean, such as yarn, hats with feathers, etc., I put in garbage bags with moth crystals for a month, then vacuumed the items and put them back away after airing them out and cleaning the closet. I inspect everything three or four times a year, and this month, when I did my spring inspection , I only found 2 larvae, so I'm hoping that I'm almost rid of them. The key is to catch the larvae and kill them before they reproduce.

Wool moths are tiny and white. Any other kind of moth is not harming your wool. However, there are other species that attack protein fibers, such as carpet beetles and bookworms. I am still fighting a species of insect that I have not identified yet. Fortunately, they are not as destructive as wool moth larvae, and they seem to prefer dust bunnies to wool, but I did find the two this spring in our clothing, though they had not made any holes.

If I think of anything else, I will post again. :) Wow, thank you for the info, so you can actually see the larva? I will check my stuff thoroughly...

Ozma
06-09-2008, 03:59 PM
Yeah, you can see the larvae. The best thing is to lay a white sheet on the floor and shake out your stuff on it. The good thing is that they don't crawl very fast.

Moth larvae are pale colored and oval-shaped. The insect I'm presently fighting is reddish brown and tapered. I think carpet beetles are reddish brown and oval-shaped.

I think the Smithsonian has a website that describes this stuff too.

katknit
06-10-2008, 10:28 AM
These are the methods I use:
http://danceswithwool.wordpress.com/2008/05/11/clothes-moths/