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tripletmomma
06-21-2008, 01:21 AM
I'm a total newbie, I started teaching myself to knit last week. I've been crocheting for about 18yrs but never did anything but baby blankets. I want to try to make my girls hats scarves & mittens for winter but I'm not sure about what to use. (I've only ever used Wal-mart available yarn before for blankets :aww: ) I'd like to use this yarn: http://www.100purewool.com/servlet/Detail?no=140 if it'll make good winter wear??? It's worsted 1ply...
I've been practing on #8 needles but also have 4mm 12in circulars that I just got (haven't triend them out yet though). I'm used to crocheting with a 4.5mm hook. I'm hoping to do mittens hats & gloves for my 3 girlies who'll be 3 this winter. I'm guessing each project will call for 1 skein of yarn but won't actually take up a whole skein each. How much yard do you think would be safe to buy? Each skein is 3.5oz 218yd. TIA!!

~Jessica

Jan in CA
06-21-2008, 01:51 AM
I suggest you use a superwash wool since you are knitting for toddlers. That yarn is beautiful, but I think it needs hand washing..do you want to do that? I'd also recommend that you use worsted or DK weight as it'll be easier to knit since you are learning.

DorothyDot
06-21-2008, 09:44 AM
Yes, Jan has it right. Wool is by far the best for cold weather - mostly because it keeps you warm even when it's wet. No other yarn has this ability.

When I was a Forest Ranger, I found that the best combination was to wear a heavy wool sweater underneath a light, wind-proof nylon jacket. Talk about toasty!

For a scarf, I much prefer using a soft, synthetic yarn. Make the scarf long and you can wrap it around your neck and across your nose and mouth - makes the icy-cold air a tad warmer as you breathe it in. [But it does cause your glasses to steam up if you're not careful!]

But yes, wool is by far what you want to use. And when you knit with a heavy [worsted] yarn and smallish needles, you get a tighter product that isn't quite as susceptible to wind penetration. Cables and textured patterns also increase the insulation factor.

Dot

panchita
06-24-2008, 01:22 AM
I also highly recommend a superwash wool. It is preshrunk, so what you knit won't shrink or felt. I've made A LOT of infant and toddler hats with this Moda Dea Washable Wool yarn (http://www.modadea.com/washablewool.htm). It comes in lots of colors, is worsted weight (uses size 7 or 8 needles). I especially like the raspberry, tangerine, moss, plum, teal and lake blue. For the most part, they coordinate very well (although the moss color is the least "coordinatable") and I made many striped hats.

There's nothing like the stunning handpainted wool you chose, but caring for it three three-year-olds will be tough.

Good luck!

tripletmomma
06-27-2008, 04:15 PM
Will washable wool still be water resistant? Sorry if this is a dumb question. I picked the purewool mainly because it's popular for diaper soakers so I know it'd help keep not only warm but snow wouldn't soak through easily.

panchita
06-28-2008, 09:08 PM
Will washable wool still be water resistant? Sorry if this is a dumb question. I picked the purewool mainly because it's popular for diaper soakers so I know it'd help keep not only warm but snow wouldn't soak through easily.



I don't know. I can't see why it wouldn't resist water in the same way. All I know is that it doesn't shrink.

tripletmomma
07-06-2008, 09:24 AM
I don't know. I can't see why it wouldn't resist water in the same way. All I know is that it doesn't shrink.
Well wool diapering items you need to keep up with lanolin to keep them waterproof. Hmmm maybe I'll just need to lanolize superwash & see what happens..... Mean I'll need to buy more- darn potty training lol

of troy
07-06-2008, 09:49 AM
will washable wool still be water resistant ?
(yes, all wools can absorb about 30% of their weight in water.. (4 oz of wool can absorb over 1 oz of liquid. )

wool also retains its insulating qualities even when wet.

its good for outwear (sweaters, hats, MITTENS! and other stuff.)

scarves are not a good idea for kids under the age of 7, (knit helmets --that cover ears, chin and neck (front and back) are a much better idea, and safer for young children--no risk of getting scarf caught on something and choking.
(for girls, add pompoms or bunny ears to make them fun)

Mittens, unless you are a glutton for punishment should have strings, for the very young, and loops (to loop onto the various hardwear adult jackets come with for adults)

knittingymnast
07-07-2008, 07:56 AM
I'm sorry! I'm really not much help,, but I suggest you get the book "The Knitter's Book of Yarn" because it taught me so much about yarn.

Knitting_Guy
07-07-2008, 08:31 AM
I agree that wool is far warmer than acrylics for Winter wear. Washable is a definite plus for children's items. Normal wool is fine if you don't mind hand washing.


If you want to go acrylic for scarves, check out Caron Simply Soft. It's quite nice to the touch and isn't as likely to feel itchy around the neck.